Syria: A country in pieces

Sky's Mark Stone reflects on how 10 years of civil war has affected civilians and what the enduring cost is in Syria.

Video Transcript

MARK STONE: The story of Syria this past 10 years begins and it ends with this man, President Bashar al-Assad. It is the story of an uprising against him, brutally suppressed by him. It's been a war which has changed our understanding of brutality. It's shifted politics well beyond its borders. And it has left the country and its people broken and divided. We're 400 miles from the capital Damascus. Amuda is in the northeastern corner of Syria.

And we're following Mohammed, from the destroyed city of Aleppo originally, but here now with his whole family. There are four generations here. All 14 of them sleep where we sit. But it's better than what they left.

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In one sense, they are the lucky ones. They're in a house, not a refugee camp. But them not being in a camp means they don't have help from charities.

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The disintegration of a country at war begins with the death and the pain, but beyond that, the legacies. On the road east, we pass a convoy of trucks, a resupply chain for the American troops who are here. These plains of northern Syria are now where the superpowers tussle for control. There's regional influence and oil to secure. This is the only place in the world where Russian and American militaries brush past each other.

Qamishli is a city like the country divided, most of it under the control of the Kurds now, but pockets are still Assad's land. In the suq, money changes need carts to carry that currency because so much is needed to buy so little. They call Walid "The Shake." In a clamor for currency, he is in demand and spells out the crisis.

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The devaluation, of course, has a devastating effect on salaries.

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Badran Cia Kurd is vice president of this region, which in the chaos, has declared itself autonomous.

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Looking for hope here after a decade of war is hard, but you can find it on the faces of the young, who will pick up the pieces. Mark Stone, Sky News, in Syria.