• Trump runs for reelection on a platform of self-regard
    Politics
    David Knowles

    Trump runs for reelection on a platform of self-regard

    The president’s self-confidence remains unshaken and will prove a central issue in the coming campaign.

  • Trump says he wasn't happy with his crowd chanting, 'Send her back!'
    Politics
    David Knowles

    Trump says he wasn't happy with his crowd chanting, 'Send her back!'

    The president says he "disagrees" with the chant spawned by his own attacks on Rep. Ilhan Omar.

  • Trump's latest 'Infrastructure Week' is over in 3 minutes
    Politics
    David Knowles

    Trump's latest 'Infrastructure Week' is over in 3 minutes

    Infrastructure Week continues to play a vital symbolic role in Washington.

  • 'Unfit for public office': Trump nominates loyalist who voted to defund Amtrak to sit on its board of directors
    Politics
    Alexander Nazaryan

    'Unfit for public office': Trump nominates loyalist who voted to defund Amtrak to sit on its board of directors

    The candidate who ran the ad was Todd Rokita, who had steadily risen through the ranks of Indiana’s Republican establishment over the past two decades, serving as the secretary of state and, later, in the U.S. House of Representatives.

  • Kamala Harris likes the idea of Biden running — as her vice president
    News
    David Knowles

    Kamala Harris likes the idea of Biden running — as her vice president

    The California senator flipped the script on worries that America isn't ready to elect a woman president.

  • Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert didn't help elect Donald Trump after all, science says
    Politics
    David Knowles

    Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert didn't help elect Donald Trump after all, science says

    Two university professors retract a paper that claimed the two former Comedy Central hosts may have affected the 2016 presidential outcome.

  • William Barr is the loyalist Trump always wanted
    Politics
    Alexander Nazaryan

    William Barr is the loyalist Trump always wanted

    The attorney general's performance on Capitol Hill Wednesday seemed designed to appeal to his boss in the Oval Office.

  • Biden's surge and Warren's resilience are bad news for Sanders
    Politics
    David Knowles

    Biden's surge and Warren's resilience are bad news for Sanders

    The former vice president makes a dramatic move in the polls.

  • Biden has one big thing to offer voters. He should run on it.
    News
    Matt Bai

    Biden has one big thing to offer voters. He should run on it.

    Joe Biden’s only path as a candidate is to stand for a return to normalcy. It’s to speak for all those Democratic voters who want a turn back to rationality, pragmatism and governance.

  • The biggest revelations in the Mueller report
    Politics
    Christopher Wilson

    The biggest revelations in the Mueller report

    Key takeaways from the 448-page, moderately redacted special counsel report.

  • Mueller report: Trump asked aides to help find Clinton's 'missing' emails
    Politics
    Jenna McLaughlin

    Mueller report: Trump asked aides to help find Clinton's 'missing' emails

    Donald Trump personally directed his advisers and contacts to help find former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s “missing” 30,000 emails, according to special counsel Robert Mueller’s report.

  • Skullduggery: (BONUS) Randy Credico
    News
    Yahoo News Video

    Skullduggery: (BONUS) Randy Credico

    Produced by Mark Seman & Anthony Kane On Dec. 11, 2018, "Skullduggery" spoke with Randy Credico, a crucial figure in the recent Roger Stone indictment, to discuss his connection with Roger Stone, Julian Assange and how he anticipates the special counsel’s report to unfold.

  • When should private emails become the public’s business?
    Politics
    Matt Bai

    When should private emails become the public’s business?

    In 1972, a group of burglars working for the Republican Party broke into Democratic headquarters in the dead of night, searching for documents that might influence that year’s presidential election. Reporters from the Washington Post spent years unraveling the scandal, until at last it brought down the president who had concealed it. Forty-four years later, a group of criminals, quite possibly working in concert with operatives from the Russian government, broke into the correspondence of Democratic campaign aides and began releasing troves of personal emails, in hopes of influencing this year’s presidential election.

  • Why Clinton hasn’t put Trump away
    Politics
    Matt Bai

    Why Clinton hasn’t put Trump away

    Clinton had proved herself again to be the diligent studier who pretends to be amused when you know she isn’t. According to all the TV analysis, which now eerily resembles an NFL playoff postgame show, Donald had self-destructed, Hillary had humiliated him, and the dynamic of the race had suddenly shifted — perhaps for good. For about the thousandth time this year, the headlines portrayed Trump as a political Gulliver bound finally in ropes and about to crash to earth once and for all.

  • The birth of a candidacy: Did the president’s mockery propel Trump into the race?
    Politics
    Michael Isikoff

    The birth of a candidacy: Did the president’s mockery propel Trump into the race?

    It was a painful moment for Donald Trump. As he sat in his tuxedo at the 2011 White House Correspondents’ Dinner, President Obama mercilessly mocked him as a loony conspiracy theorist. “I think that is the night that he resolves to run for president,” Roger Stone, a longtime Trump adviser and confidant, says in the film.

  • Like everything else, the debates are all about Trump
    News
    Matt Bai

    Like everything else, the debates are all about Trump

    Whether from incompetence or instability, Donald Trump has made himself not the default alternative to a deeply distrusted candidate, but the dominant and more divisive figure of the two.

  • Stuck in the middle with boomers, again
    Politics
    Matt Bai

    Stuck in the middle with boomers, again

    Hillary Clinton has a cough. Clinton’s cough, first reported by NBC, led to a spate of media stories, most of which slyly purported to be about the media coverage of the cough, although they managed to leave open the possibility that Clinton, who turns 69 next month, was like one of those bygone Soviet premiers who were always seen smiling and waving about six weeks after their deaths. Not that we know much more about the health of Donald Trump, who is 16 months older than Clinton.

  • The next 10 weeks will be brought to you by the 1990s
    News
    Lisa Belkin

    The next 10 weeks will be brought to you by the 1990s

    With news this week that longtime anti-Clinton conspiracy theorist David Bossie is joining the Trump campaign, and that longtime Clinton defender Joe Conason is publishing another book in their defense, it feels, more than ever, like that decade never ended. Hillary and Bill. Our flashback begins with our main characters, the former president, whose critics called him Slick Willie, and his wife, whom Donald Trump now calls Crooked Hillary. Bill was heavier back then, Hillary was thinner, but their basic temperaments were already in place.

  • Let’s talk infrastructure, since Clinton won’t
    Politics
    Matt Bai

    Let’s talk infrastructure, since Clinton won’t

    By taking a look at Hillary Clinton’s plan to fix the deteriorating foundation of our economy, you can discern a lot about what she’s getting right in this campaign, and what she isn’t. It’s been a momentous week in politics, what with a former congressman sending more lewd pictures of himself, and Donald Trump invading Mexico, and Rick Perry joining Ryan Lochte on the cast of “Dancing With the Stars,” because apparently his balky back is now completely healed but his dignity is fractured in too many places to count. Probably nothing the candidates discuss this fall will be more important in the long term than investing in infrastructure.