Taiwan releases train crash suspect on bond

As Taiwan reels from its deadliest rail disaster in decades, a court on Saturday released on bond the manager of a construction site whose truck authorities believe to have caused the crash.

The disaster happened on Friday after an express train hit the truck, which had slid down a bank.

At least 50 people were killed, including a driver.

The French government says one of its citizens died. Taiwan says an American was also killed, and another missing.

The construction site's manager is suspected of failing to properly engage the truck's brakes.

Prosecutors had applied to a court to detain him on charges of causing death by negligence.

The train, which was en route from the Taiwanese capital Taipei to the east coast city of Taitung, was carrying almost 500 people when it crashed.

Many were tourists and people heading home at the start of a long weekend holiday for the traditional Tomb Sweeping Day.

Workers on Saturday began moving the back part of the train away from the site.

That section was relatively undamaged, having come to a stop outside the tunnel, while the more heavily damaged sections are still mangled inside.

Taiwanese president Tsai Ing-wen visited survivors in hospital on Saturday.

Video Transcript

- As Taiwan reels from its deadliest rail disaster in decades, a court on Saturday released on bond the manager of a construction site whose truck authorities believed to have caused the crash. The disaster happened on Friday after an express train hit the truck, which had slid down a bank. At least 50 people were killed, including a driver. The French government says one of its citizens died. Taiwan says an American was also killed and another missing.

The construction site's manager is suspected of failing to properly engage the truck's brakes. Prosecutors had applied to a court to detain him on charges of causing death by negligence. The train, which was en route from the Taiwanese capital Taipei to the east coast city of Taitung, was carrying almost 500 people when it crashed. Many were tourists and people heading home at the start of a long weekend holiday.

Workers on Saturday began moving the back part of the train away from the site. That section was relatively undamaged, having come to a stop outside the tunnel, while the more heavily damaged sections are still mangled inside. Taiwanese president Tsai Ing-wen visited survivors in hospital on Saturday.