Teenage metal detectorists dig up 1,000 year old coins in most lucrative haul discovered by minors

Dominic Penna
·2 min read
Undated handout photo of a Harold II silver penny found by Reece Pickering in Norfolk. The coin, along with a Henry I silver penny found by Walter Taylor in Essex, will be sold at auction by Derbyshire-based Hansons' Auctioneers from October 26 - Hansons/PA Wire
Undated handout photo of a Harold II silver penny found by Reece Pickering in Norfolk. The coin, along with a Henry I silver penny found by Walter Taylor in Essex, will be sold at auction by Derbyshire-based Hansons' Auctioneers from October 26 - Hansons/PA Wire

Teenage metal detectorists have dug up 1,000-year-old coins in what is thought to be the most lucrative haul discovered by minors.

Separate discoveries by Reece Pickering, 17, and Walter Taylor, 16, unearthed a Saxon coin in a Norfolk field and a regal silver penny in an Essex field respectively.

The coin found by Reece has an approximate price of £2,500 to £3,000, while Walter’s find is preemptively valued at £3,000 to £3,500.

Reece Pickering with a George III gold guinea he found six months after he started metal detecting - Jonathan Crowe/Hansons/SWNS
Reece Pickering with a George III gold guinea he found six months after he started metal detecting - Jonathan Crowe/Hansons/SWNS

Reece was metal detecting with his father Jonny Crowe, 41, in August when he discovered the Harold II silver penny which dated back to 1066.

Mr Crowe said that the coin, which has been recorded with the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge, is among only three that are known to still exist.

“The day Reece found it we were out metal detecting in a couple of farmers’ fields,” he said.

“The next minute I heard Reece shouting and waving from the other side of the field. I went over and there he was with his find.”

Video: Metal detectorists discover haul of gold coins worth at least 100k

After four hours of metal detecting with his father and uncle, Walter discovered a silver penny depicting Henry I and which dates from 1106.

“I knew it could be a good one and sent the picture to an expert,” he said. “It’s really rare. I’ve been metal detecting since I was four and this is my biggest find.”

The items discovered by the youngsters will be sold at a two-day online auction hosted by Hansons Auctioneers next Monday (October 26).