2 ultra-rare Ferraris sold for more than $2 million each at auction without anyone seeing them in person

klee@businessinsider.com (Kristen Lee)
2003 Ferrari Enzo.

Karissa Hosek/Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

  • RM Sotheby's auctioned off a Ferrari 288 GTO and Enzo on May 21.
  • Both cars fetched more than $2 million apiece.
  • The entire auction was held online-only, and RM Sotheby's believed that it could be the first auction company to sell a car worth more than $2 million online. 
  • Total auction sales totaled $16,385,738.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

With the end of the COVID-19 pandemic nowhere in sight, many are consigned to largely staying at home and browsing life through the window of the internet. At least there are online car auctions to flip through. 

RM Sotheby's hosted its Driving Into Summer online-only auction last month, which opened May 21 and ran through May 29. Because of the pandemic, it was the company's first consignment-based collector car auction held exclusively online. 

Three cars that headlined this particular auction. They were iconic Ferraris: a 1985 Ferrari 288 GTO, a 1995 Ferrari F50, and a 2003 Ferrari Enzo. The 288 GTO and Enzo fetched well over $2 million apiece. The F50 did not meet reserve and is still for sale at the time of Monday's writing.

"I believe we'll be the first [auction company] to sell a car worth $2 million-plus online," Gord Duff, RM Sotheby's global head of auctions, told Robb Report recently. 

An RM Sotheby's spokesperson backed up Duff's claims, telling Business Insider that to the best of the company's knowledge, "no other auction house has sold a car at this value in a dedicated, online-only collector car auction."

In total, RM Sotheby's raised $16,385,738 in sales during the Driving into Summer online-only auction. The Ferrari Enzo indeed became what the auction house claims is the "most valuable car sold in a dedicated online-only collector car auction to date." It sold for $2.6 million.

Not too far behind that was the 288 GTO, which sold for $2.3 million. You can take a look at a list of the complete results here.

The auction house says more than 80 cars were available.

Editor's note: This post has been updated to indicate the F50 did not meet the reserve and is still for sale.

Auction house RM Sotheby's hosted its Driving Into Summer auction last month and it was online only due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

2003 Ferrari Enzo.

Karissa Hosek/Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

But going online only isn’t the worst thing for RM Sotheby’s.

1995 Ferrari F50.

Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

With three Ferraris that fetched over $2 million each, the company broke auction records.

1985 Ferrari 288 GTO.

Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

RM Sotheby's told Business Insider that to the best of its knowledge, "no other auction house has sold a car at this value in a dedicated, online-only collector car auction."

First up is this 1985 Ferrari 288 GTO, which sold for $2.3 million.

1985 Ferrari 288 GTO.

Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

It is one of just 272 ever made.

1985 Ferrari 288 GTO.

Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

It also has optional air-conditioning and power windows. A luxury!

1985 Ferrari 288 GTO.

Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

The 288 was originally built so Ferrari could enter the Group B rally championship.

1985 Ferrari 288 GTO.

Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

As Road & Track tells it, Group B was a set of rally regulations in the 1980s that more or less prioritized speed over safety.

Ultimately, Group B was canceled before the 288 got to do any factory-backed racing. But Ferrari carried on building the car for consumer production anyway.

It has a tiny, 2.8-liter twin-turbocharged V8 that makes 400 horsepower.

1985 Ferrari 288 GTO.

Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

It also boasted the ability to go 189 mph.

1985 Ferrari 288 GTO.

Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

That’s impressive even in 2020.

1985 Ferrari 288 GTO.

Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

The interior is pretty bare with black leather.

1985 Ferrari 288 GTO.

Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

And a gated manual shifter.

1985 Ferrari 288 GTO.

Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

But the whole point of this car isn’t luxury, it’s for driving.

1985 Ferrari 288 GTO.

Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

People who have driven it say it's incredible.

1985 Ferrari 288 GTO.

Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

Road & Track's Sam Smith once wrote, "You become comfortable with it, and then you toe a bit too much into the boost and it turns into a tail-happy weirdo with far too much soul and this kind of grumbling exhaust note that just begs you to do silly things. ... This thing is great. It's friendly but eminently fearsome, drivable but perfectly involving. I want. I want, I want, I want."

Same, bud, same.

Anyone want to buy a girl a present? The time is now.

Then there's this 1995 Ferrari F50, which did not meet the reserve. The asking price is now $2.5 million.

1995 Ferrari F50.

Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

Of the 349 made, this is the second one.

1995 Ferrari F50.

Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

It shows just 3,371 miles on the clock.

1995 Ferrari F50.

Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

It represents one of Ferrari's flagship V12 halo cars.

1995 Ferrari F50.

Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

That naturally aspirated V12 makes 512 horsepower and has an 8,000-rpm redline.

1995 Ferrari F50.

Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

And the car has a manual transmission!

1995 Ferrari F50.

Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

To keep the weight down, the F50 uses a carbon-fiber tub in its chassis structure.

1995 Ferrari F50.

Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

The interior is also very bare bones, so passengers don't forget this is a lightweight car meant for speed.

1995 Ferrari F50.

Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

You have to manually roll the windows up and down.

1995 Ferrari F50.

Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

All in all, the F50 weighs just over 3,000 pounds.

1995 Ferrari F50.

Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

This is the Ferrari that apparently straddled the raw Ferraris of the past and the technological ones of the present.

1995 Ferrari F50.

Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

A 2003 Ferrari Enzo was also available and sold for $2.6 million.

2003 Ferrari Enzo.

Karissa Hosek/Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

It has fewer than 1,250 miles on the clock.

2003 Ferrari Enzo.

Karissa Hosek/Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

This is the last V12 Ferrari halo car to be offered with just a naturally aspirated engine.

2003 Ferrari Enzo.

Karissa Hosek/Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

Its successor, the Ferrari LaFerrari, makes do with a hybrid powertrain.

2003 Ferrari Enzo.

Karissa Hosek/Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

The Enzo also uses a carbon-fiber tub for lightness and rigidity.

2003 Ferrari Enzo.

Karissa Hosek/Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

It was designed to look like an open-wheel race car.

2003 Ferrari Enzo.

Karissa Hosek/Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

Visually, its shapes aren’t always congruent with each other.

2003 Ferrari Enzo.

Karissa Hosek/Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

But you cannot deny how striking it is.

2003 Ferrari Enzo.

Karissa Hosek/Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

Aside from the Ferraris, there's this 1934 Packard Twelve Convertible Victoria.

1934 Packard Twelve Convertible Victoria.

Gabor Mayer/Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

I can’t say I’ve much love for the pre-war classics, but this would be pretty baller to drive around in.

1934 Packard Twelve Convertible Victoria.

Gabor Mayer/Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

There's a V12 engine along with a V-shaped radiator shell.

1934 Packard Twelve Convertible Victoria.

Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

The wood and leather used inside make it look like a gorgeous boat cabin.

1934 Packard Twelve Convertible Victoria.

Gabor Mayer/Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

This example recently underwent a complete restoration, so it looks great.

1934 Packard Twelve Convertible Victoria.

Gabor Mayer/Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

Here’s a 1958 Ferrari 250 GT Coupe by Ellena.

1958 Ferrari 250 GT Coupe by Ellena.

Juan Martinez/Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

It’s a slightly modified version of a Ferrari 250 GT, built by a firm called Ellena.

1958 Ferrari 250 GT Coupe by Ellena.

Juan Martinez/Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

Ellena built 50 modified cars but there are fewer than 40 in existence today.

1958 Ferrari 250 GT Coupe by Ellena.

Juan Martinez/Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

It has a 3.0-liter V12 and drum brakes.

1958 Ferrari 250 GT Coupe by Ellena.

Juan Martinez/Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

And the interior is green!

1958 Ferrari 250 GT Coupe by Ellena.

Juan Martinez/Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

You can’t really get better than the 1959 Maserati 3500 GT by Touring.

1959 Maserati 3500 GT.

Juan Martinez/Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

Not only is the color beautiful, but it also enhances the classical beauty of 1950s car design.

1959 Maserati 3500 GT.

Juan Martinez/Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

This particular car was restored in the late 2000s.

1959 Maserati 3500 GT.

Juan Martinez/Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

This go-kart looking thing is a 1965 Shelby 427 S/C Cobra 4000 Series.

1965 Shelby 427 S/C Cobra 4000 Series.

Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

It's got the shape of a British roadster, but it's powered by American muscle.

1965 Shelby 427 S/C Cobra 4000 Series.

Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

That muscle takes the form of a 496-cubic-inch V8 that makes an estimated 650 horsepower.

1965 Shelby 427 S/C Cobra 4000 Series.

Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

This particular car was completed in 2017.

There are many replicas of these cars running around; this is the real thing.

1965 Shelby 427 S/C Cobra 4000 Series.

Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

Oh, and also: it only has two (2) miles on its odometer.

1965 Shelby 427 S/C Cobra 4000 Series.

Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

This pristine white example is a 1967 Chevrolet Corvette Sting Ray 427/390 Convertible.

1967 Chevrolet Corvette Sting Ray 427/390 Convertible.

Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

It’s from the second generation of the Corvette, called the C2.

1967 Chevrolet Corvette Sting Ray 427/390 Convertible.

Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

It's powered by a 427-cubic-inch V8 that makes 390 horsepower.

1967 Chevrolet Corvette Sting Ray 427/390 Convertible.

Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

And there's a four-speed manual transmission.

1967 Chevrolet Corvette Sting Ray 427/390 Convertible.

Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

To read more about Corvettes, go here.

Next up is a 1989 Porsche 911 Speedster.

1989 Porsche 911 Speedster.

Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

It is only one of 819 built for the North American market.

1989 Porsche 911 Speedster.

Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

The 911 Speedster was built as a limited-edition celebration of the 356 Speedsters from the 1950s.

1989 Porsche 911 Speedster.

Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

It uses a 911 Turbo-specific chassis.

1989 Porsche 911 Speedster.

Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

It’s based on the 3.2-liter 911 Carrera.

1989 Porsche 911 Speedster.

Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

It displays just 41 original miles.

1989 Porsche 911 Speedster.

Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

Then, there's this 2002 Ferrari 575M Maranello.

2002 Ferrari 575M Maranello.

Ted7.com Photography/Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

If you have a thing for front-engined Ferrari grand tourers that aren't red, this is the car for you.

2002 Ferrari 575M Maranello.

Ted7.com Photography/Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

There are 10,701 miles on the clock, so it’s a car that’s been driven.

2002 Ferrari 575M Maranello.

Ted7.com Photography/Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

Not merely a garage queen.

2002 Ferrari 575M Maranello.

Ted7.com Photography/Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

As a side note, these are some of the most gorgeous photos of a car I’ve ever seen.

2002 Ferrari 575M Maranello.

Ted7.com Photography/Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

This silver 2005 Ferrari Superamerica definitely shows some restraint.

2005 Ferrari Superamerica.

Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

It has less than 3,500 miles on the clock.

2005 Ferrari Superamerica.

Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

And it has a really beautiful color combination.

2005 Ferrari Superamerica.

Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

This would be a nice car to take on California's Pacific Coast Highway.

2005 Ferrari Superamerica.

Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

The 2006 Ford GT Heritage was built specially to celebrate the legendary Ford GT40.

2006 Ford GT Heritage.

Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

The GT40s raced successfully at Le Mans in the 1960s.

2006 Ford GT Heritage.

Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

The Ford GT was Ford’s tribute to the race cars in the 2000s.

2006 Ford GT Heritage.

Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

The first-generation GTs are powered by a 5.4-liter, supercharged V8.

2006 Ford GT Heritage.

Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

They make 550 horsepower.

2006 Ford GT Heritage.

Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

The Heritage edition was launched in 2006, the GT’s final model year.

2006 Ford GT Heritage.

Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

It’s finished in Heritage Blue with Epic Orange stripes.

2006 Ford GT Heritage.

Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

It’s a look that’s inspired by the Gulf Oil livery on the Le Mans-winning GT40.

2006 Ford GT Heritage.

Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

This particular GT was the last Heritage example built.

2006 Ford GT Heritage.

Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

The Ford GT returned more than 10 years later with the 2017 Ford GT.

2017 Ford GT.

Kevin Uy/Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

Ford famously held an application process for people who wanted to buy one.

2017 Ford GT.

Kevin Uy/Courtesy of RM Sotheby'sCourtesy of RM Sotheby's

Buyers were legally forbidden from reselling their GTs until after two years of ownership.

2017 Ford GT.

Kevin Uy/Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

The new GT has a twin-turbocharged V6.

2017 Ford GT.

Kevin Uy/Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

It puts out 647 horsepower.

2017 Ford GT.

Kevin Uy/Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

And has a top speed of 216 mph.

2017 Ford GT.

Kevin Uy/Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

What's cool is that the seats are fixed for ideal weight distribution, so the pedals and steering wheel move instead.

2017 Ford GT.

Kevin Uy/Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

Yellow's a good color for it.

2017 Ford GT.

Kevin Uy/Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

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