TODAY'S FORECAST

Father's Day forecast from the KPIX 5 Weather Team

  • Seattle mayor, City Council at odds over 50% police cut
    Associated Press

    Seattle mayor, City Council at odds over 50% police cut

    Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan on Monday blasted the City Council's plan to cut the police department's budget by 50% and instead proposed transferring a list of functions like the 911 call center and parking enforcement out of the agency's budget. “The community has made clear, they want us to transform the Seattle Police Department and to reinvest in programs that provide this kind of community safety.” Monday's announcement came after weeks of street protests sparked by the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis.

  • Education Secretary Betsy Devos says it should be 'the rule' to return students to classrooms in the fall
    Business Insider

    Education Secretary Betsy Devos says it should be 'the rule' to return students to classrooms in the fall

    Education Secretary Betsy Devos on Sunday doubled down on the Trump administration's position on opening schools in the fall amid the US' ongoing record spike in cases of the novel coronavirus. "There is going to be the exception to the rule," Devos said. While children are at low risk of serious illness and death from COVID-19, the CDC has said that they can function as asymptomatic carriers of the virus and can pose risks to vulnerable populations.

  • Ousted U.S. Attorney Geoffrey Berman: Deal Barr Offered ‘Could Be Seen as a Quid Pro Quo’
    The Daily Beast

    Ousted U.S. Attorney Geoffrey Berman: Deal Barr Offered ‘Could Be Seen as a Quid Pro Quo’

    Geoffrey Berman, formerly the U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York, was brought in for a closed-door session of the Judiciary Committee on July 9 to talk about the events surrounding Barr's public announcement on June 19 that Berman had “stepped down” from his post, even though the U.S. attorney made clear to Barr multiple times that he was not stepping down. The next day, Berman said he would leave the job when Barr agreed to let his deputy take over as acting U.S. attorney, as opposed to Craig Carpenito, the U.S. attorney for the district of New Jersey, whom Barr wanted to install in the position until the Trump administration's pick, Securities and Exchange Commission chief Jay Clayton, was confirmed by the U.S. Senate.

  • French man accused of molesting hundreds of children dies in Indonesia
    BBC

    French man accused of molesting hundreds of children dies in Indonesia

    A French man accused of molesting hundreds of children in Indonesia has died in a suspected suicide, police say. Francois Camille Abello, 65, was found unresponsive in his cell at a detention centre in the capital, Jakarta, last Thursday, said spokesman Yusri Yunus. Mr Abello was pronounced dead on Sunday night after three days of treatment.

  • It’s so hot at Death Valley National Park that cars are breaking down
    Miami Herald

    It’s so hot at Death Valley National Park that cars are breaking down

    Having your car break down is never pleasant, but it's probably much worse when it's 128 degrees outside. Some unlucky visitors at Death Valley National Park ran into car trouble Sunday when the extreme heat caused their engines to give out, the park said Monday. Yesterday's excessive heat caused at least three vehicles in the park to break down from overheated engines, which can quickly turn fatal if passengers are stranded in this climate without air conditioning,” Death Valley National Park officials said on Facebook.

  • Couple who threatened Black Lives Matter protesters with guns once destroyed children's beehives
    Yahoo News Video

    Couple who threatened Black Lives Matter protesters with guns once destroyed children's beehives

    St. Louis couple Mark and Patricia McCloskey drew national attention in June when they flashed guns at Black Lives Matter protesters walking down their street.

  • Appeals court paves way for first federal execution in 17 years
    CBS News

    Appeals court paves way for first federal execution in 17 years

    The 7th Circuit Court of Appeals on Sunday overturned a lower court ruling staying the execution of Daniel Lewis Lee. The execution, scheduled for Monday in Indiana, would be the first federal execution in 17 years. The family of Lee's victims filed a petition to delay the execution because they wanted to attend, but feared traveling to Indiana during the coronavirus pandemic.

  • New York mayor 'heartbroken' over shooting death of one-year-old
    Reuters

    New York mayor 'heartbroken' over shooting death of one-year-old

    New York Mayor Bill de Blasio observed a moment of silence and declared himself "heartbroken" on Monday over the death of a 1-year-old boy who was shot in his stroller at a Brooklyn playground, part of a recent surge of gun violence in the city. Toddler Davell Gardner Jr. was killed and three men were wounded on Sunday after two gunmen opened fire at a family cookout in the Bedford-Stuyvesant section of Brooklyn, New York media reported, citing New York police. The three wounded men were expected to survive.

  • 'Not a Welcoming Name': Calls to Drop 'Plantation' Gain Steam Nationwide
    The New York Times

    'Not a Welcoming Name': Calls to Drop 'Plantation' Gain Steam Nationwide

    When Dharyl Auguste was 3 years old, he and his parents packed all of their belongings and left their home in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, to immigrate to the United States. The family settled initially in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, before moving to nearby Sunrise. When it was time for Auguste to attend middle school, he and his parents relocated again, this time to Plantation, Florida.

  • AOC suggests NYC crime spike linked to unemployment and parents shoplifting to feed children
    The Independent

    AOC suggests NYC crime spike linked to unemployment and parents shoplifting to feed children

    New York congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez has insisted that spikes in New York crime are not related to police budget cuts but people needing to pay rent and feed their children. In a virtual town hall meeting on Thursday, reported by The Hill, AOC was questioned about the significant rise in crime in the city. “Do we think this has to do with the fact that there's record unemployment in the United States right now?” she said.

  • 64 Stunning Kitchen Island Ideas
    Architectural Digest

    64 Stunning Kitchen Island Ideas

    Bring on the prep space Originally Appeared on Architectural Digest

  • US Air Force F-16 fighter jet crashes at New Mexico base, marking service's fifth fighter jet crash since May
    Business Insider

    US Air Force F-16 fighter jet crashes at New Mexico base, marking service's fifth fighter jet crash since May

    A US Air Force F-16C Viper crashed during landing at Holloman Air Force Base in New Mexico Monday, the Air Force said in a statement. The crash is the fifth Air Force fighter jet since mid-May. Two of the previous crashes saw the losses of Air Force pilots. A US Air Force F-16C Viper fighter jet crashed while landing at Holloman Air Force Base in New Mexico Monday, marking the service's fifth fighter jet crash since May.

  • New Zealand mosque shooter dismisses lawyers to represent himself at sentencing
    The Telegraph

    New Zealand mosque shooter dismisses lawyers to represent himself at sentencing

    The gunman behind New Zealand's Christchurch mosque shootings sacked his lawyers on Monday and opted to represent himself, raising fears he would use a sentencing hearing next month to promote his white-supremacist views. Australian national Brenton Tarrant will be sentenced on August 24 on 51 murder convictions, 40 of attempted murder and one of terrorism arising from last year's massacre, the worst mass shooting in New Zealand's modern history. At a pre-sentencing hearing on Monday, High Court judge Cameron Mander allowed Tarrant's lawyers, Shane Tait and Jonathan Hudson, to withdraw from proceedings at the request of their client.

  • A squirrel tested positive for the bubonic plague in Colorado. Are people at risk?
    Miami Herald

    A squirrel tested positive for the bubonic plague in Colorado. Are people at risk?

    Humans can get the plague if an infected animal or flea bites them or if an infected person coughs on them, according to Jefferson County Public Health. Cats are especially susceptible to the plague and if not treated properly, they may die, the release said. They can get the plague through infected flea bites, a rodent scratch or bite or if they eat an infected rodent, according to the release.

  • Los Angeles and San Diego schools to remain online-only in autumn
    The Guardian

    Los Angeles and San Diego schools to remain online-only in autumn

    Decisions on reopening California schools are made at the local level, a feature that has created a patchwork of plans – which include online or in-person instruction, or a combination of the two. But even as southern California's biggest school districts toggle back reopening plans, education officials in neighboring Orange county, which has emerged as a seat of organized resistance to mandatory mask orders, appears ready to buck the trend. This week, Orange county education officials are expected to recommend that schools hold in-person instruction in the autumn without requiring that students wear face masks or that schools reduce class sizes to allow for physical distancing.

  • Airline contacts US senator over maskless photo
    AFP

    Airline contacts US senator over maskless photo

    American Airlines said Monday it had contacted Republican Senator Ted Cruz after he was seen without a mask on a flight, but he said he had only removed it to eat and drink. Health experts and scientists have called on politicians to set an example by wearing face coverings as the coronavirus rages across the United States. "While our policy does not apply while eating or drinking, we have reached out to Senator Cruz to affirm the importance of this policy," American Airlines said in a statement.

  • Hamburg sex workers demand Germany's brothels reopen
    Reuters

    Hamburg sex workers demand Germany's brothels reopen

    Prostitutes demonstrated in Hamburg's red light district late on Saturday evening demanding that Germany's brothels be allowed to reopen after months of closure to curb the spread of coronavirus. With shops, restaurants and bars all open again in Germany, where prostitution is legal, sex workers say they are being singled out and deprived of their livelihoods despite not posing a greater health risk. "The oldest profession needs your help," read a notice held up by one woman in a brothel window in the Herbertstrasse, which was flooded with red light after being dark since March.

  • South Africa's 9 million smokers were faced with cold turkey when the government banned cigarette sales in March as a coronavirus measure. Now Big Tobacco is fighting back.
    INSIDER

    South Africa's 9 million smokers were faced with cold turkey when the government banned cigarette sales in March as a coronavirus measure. Now Big Tobacco is fighting back.

    earlier in July. South Africa's government had also banned the sale of alcohol but has since eased that restriction, which according to an AP report, has led to an increase in "drunken brawls and traffic accidents, putting added strain on hospitals as they deal with the virus." Reuters FITA is also arguing that by banning the legal sale of cigarettes, the South African government is encouraging a black market trade, and putting thousands of jobs at risk.

  • Iran blames bad communication, alignment for jet shootdown
    Associated Press

    Iran blames bad communication, alignment for jet shootdown

    A misaligned missile battery, miscommunication between troops and their commanders and a decision to fire without authorization all led to Iran's Revolutionary Guard shooting down a Ukrainian jetliner in January, killing all 176 people on board, a new report says. The report released late Saturday by Iran's Civil Aviation Organization comes months after the Jan. 8 crash near Tehran. Authorities had initially denied responsibility, only changing course days later after Western nations presented extensive evidence that Iran had shot down the plane.

  • St Louis couple who pointed guns at Black Lives Matter protesters 'almost always in conflict with others', report says
    The Independent

    St Louis couple who pointed guns at Black Lives Matter protesters 'almost always in conflict with others', report says

    The white couple who were photographed pointing guns at protesters in St Louis, have been revealed to have had several conflicts over their property in recent years, from a number of lawsuits to the smashing of children's beehives. Personal-injury attorneys Mark and Patricia McCloskey were seen standing outside their home holding a handgun and a rifle at Black Lives Matter (BLM) protesters who were walking down their street on 28 June. Since then, a lengthy investigation by The St Louis Post-Dispatch has revealed that the couple is “almost always” embroiled in conflict with others, namely over their property.

  • Fact check: Trump campaign accused of T-shirt design with similarity to Nazi eagle
    USA TODAY

    Fact check: Trump campaign accused of T-shirt design with similarity to Nazi eagle

    The claim: Trump campaign shirts feature imperial eagle, a Nazi symbol President Donald Trump's campaign website recently unveiled a T-shirt that has come under fire because of perceived design similarities between its logo and a Nazi symbol. The similarity was first noticed, according to Forward, by two Twitter accounts, Bend the Arc: Jewish Action, described as a Jewish progressive group, and the Lincoln Project, an anti-Trump group formed by Republicans. "The President of the United States is campaigning for reelection with a Nazi symbol.

  • German study finds no evidence coronavirus spreads in schools
    The Telegraph

    German study finds no evidence coronavirus spreads in schools

    Schools do not play a major role in spreading the coronavirus, according to the results of a German study released on Monday. The study, the largest carried out on schoolchildren and teachers in Germany, found traces of the virus in fewer than 1 per cent of teachers and children. Scientists from Dresden Technical University said they believe children may act as a “brake” on chains of infection.

  • Police officers' connection to communities they serve is broken. Here's how to repair it.
    USA TODAY Opinion

    Police officers' connection to communities they serve is broken. Here's how to repair it.

    The death of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis police officers and the follow-on nationwide protests has thrust the issue of police reform from the periphery of the nation's consciousness to a first-tier public policy issue. As is typical in American discussions of crime and punishment, the public remains divided between those who focus on the root causes of the excessive police force that brought on protests, demonstrations and, occasionally, riots and those who are concerned with how the disturbances threaten public safety and the rule of law. This polarization is not helpful to addressing either the needs of over-policed and violence-prone neighborhoods or better equipping the officers tasked with maintaining safety and order and preventing excessive use of force by the police.

  • Oregonians still want to join Idaho — and filed a lawsuit to make it happen, group says
    Miami Herald

    Oregonians still want to join Idaho — and filed a lawsuit to make it happen, group says

    The Oregon residents who want to move Idaho's border don't want the coronavirus to get in the way of their plans. “Move Oregon's Border for a Greater Idaho,” a group of residents in southwestern Oregon who created petitions to move Idaho's border west to include part of their state, told McClatchy News on Monday that their president filed a federal lawsuit. “Move Oregon's Border for a Greater Idaho announced July 13 that their president had filed a federal lawsuit, in light of the COVID-19 situation, hoping for a reduction of the number of signatures required to get their ballot initiatives on ballots in rural Oregon counties,” President Mike McCarter said in an email statement to McClatchy News.

  • Barack Obama’s Presidential Library Hits a Major Roadblock
    Architectural Digest

    Barack Obama’s Presidential Library Hits a Major Roadblock

    More than three years after he left the White House, Barack Obama's Presidential Center has hit another roadblock on its long path to construction. Approval for the center—which is set in Chicago's leafy Jackson Park and slated to cost some $500 million—is facing a new delay following a demand by the Illinois State Historic Preservation Office (HPO) for “additional design reviews.” The reviews come as part of the Federal Highway Administration's larger approval process, which is nearing its end.