Top Asian News 2:55 a.m. GMT

LONDON (AP) — The Chinese tech company Huawei on Saturday announced it has fired a sales director who was arrested in Poland and charged with spying for China, saying he has brought the firm's reputation "into disrepute." The company said it has "decided to terminate the employment of Mr. Wang Weijing, who was arrested on suspicion of breaking Polish law." Polish authorities said Friday they have arrested Wang, a Chinese citizen and former diplomat, along with a Polish cybersecurity expert who had held several top government cybersecurity jobs and also worked at the telecom company Orange. Huawei said Wang's actions "have no relation to the company" and that he was fired because "the incident in question has brought Huawei into disrepute." The arrest rekindled tensions between China and the West over cybersecurity concerns surrounding Huawei.

TORONTO (AP) — Tired but smiling, an 18-year-old Saudi woman who said she feared death if deported back home arrived Saturday in Canada, which offered her asylum in a case that attracted global attention after she mounted a social media campaign. "This is Rahaf Alqunun, a very brave new Canadian," Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland said arm-in-arm with the Saudi woman in Toronto's airport. Rahaf Mohammed Alqunun smiled broadly as she exited an airport arrival door sporting a Canada zipper hoodie and a U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees hat, capping a dramatic week that saw her flee her family while visiting Kuwait and before flying to Bangkok.

BEIJING (AP) — Twenty-one coal miners were killed when a mine collapsed in northern China, state media reported Sunday. The disaster occurred Saturday in Shenmu in Shaanxi province in the heart of the country's coal-mining belt, according to state TV and the Xinhua News Agency. Sixty-six other miners were rescued, the city government said in a statement. The number of fatalities reported in cave-ins, explosions and other disasters in Chinese coal mines has fallen sharply over the past decade but the industry still is the world's deadliest.

BEIJING (AP) — The U.S. Navy's top officer will visit China starting Sunday amid increasing frictions in the South China Sea and other tensions underscoring their rivalry for dominance in Asia. Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson will meet with his counterpart Vice Adm. Shen Jinlong and leaders of China's Central Military Commission during his visit to Beijing and the eastern city of Nanjing lasting through Wednesday, the Navy said. The goal of the visit, Richardson's second as head of operations, is to "continue a results-oriented, risk reduction focused dialogue" between the two militaries, the Navy said. "A routine exchange of views is essential, especially in times of friction, in order to reduce risk and avoid miscalculation," the release quoted Richardson as saying.

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia (AP) — The central Malaysian state of Pahang's soon-to-be new sultan is tipped to become the country's next king under a unique rotating monarchy system. The Conference of Rulers has said it will pick a new king among nine hereditary state rulers on Jan. 24 following the sudden abdication of Sultan Muhammad V after just two years on the throne. No reasons were given for the Jan. 6 abdication, the first in the nation's history, which came after the 49-year-old Sultan Muhammad V reportedly married a former Russian beauty queen. Pahang's 88-year-old Sultan Ahmad Shah is next in line to be king, but he is gravely ill.

TORONTO (AP) — Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said Friday that Chinese officials are not respecting the diplomatic immunity of one of the Canadians detained in China last month as he ramped up efforts to get them released. China arrested former Canadian diplomat Michael Kovrig and entrepreneur Michael Spavor on vague national security allegations. The arrests came after a top Chinese executive was arrested in Canada on Dec. 1 at the request of Washington, which wants Huawei chief financial officer Meng Wanzhou extradited to face charges that she misled banks about the company's business dealings in Iran. She is out on bail in Canada and awaiting a bail extradition proceeding next month.

TOKYO (AP) — Nissan Chief Performance Officer Jose Munoz, who took a leave of absence a week ago, has resigned, the first high-profile departure at the Japanese automaker publicly acknowledged as related to the arrest of former Chairman Carlos Ghosn. Munoz said in a statement on LinkedIn Saturday he made the decision after serious thinking because the company was "involved in matters that have and will continue to divert its focus," referring to Ghosn's case. Munoz is among several executives media speculated might succeed Ghosn, who led Nissan for two decades. Nissan confirmed the resignation, effective immediately. There have been other recent departures from Nissan, but Nissan has denied they were related to Ghosn's case.

YANGON, Myanmar (AP) — A court in Myanmar on Friday rejected the appeal of two Reuters journalists convicted of violating the country's Official Secrets Act during their reporting on the country's crackdown on Rohingya Muslims, and maintained the seven-year prison terms they were sentenced to last year. Judge Aung Naing said in his ruling that lawyers for the men failed to submit enough evidence to prove their innocence. The conviction of Wa Lone and Kyaw Soe Oo has drawn condemnation from rights groups, Western governments and global press associations and has raised questions about press freedom in Myanmar as it transitions from a decades of military rule.

PARIS (AP) — In the latest blow to the International Olympic Committee's efforts to rid itself of scandal, marketing head Tsunekazu Takeda is being investigated for corruption related to the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. Takeda, who is also the president of the Japanese Olympic Committee, was placed under formal investigation for "active corruption" on Dec. 10, France's financial crimes office said Friday. French investigators are in the midst of a years-long and wide-ranging probe into sports corruption that is looking, among other things, at the bidding contests for the 2020 Olympics and other major sports events. Takeda's career in Olympic circles has ticked almost every box, starting with representing Japan in equestrian at the 1972 Munich Games and 1976 Montreal Games.

TAIPEI, Taiwan (AP) — Taiwanese President Tsai Ing-wen appointed a close political ally as premier during a Cabinet reshuffle Friday following the ruling party's heavy election losses and growing pressure from rival China. Su Tseng-chang took charge of the Cabinet amid tense relations with Beijing, which threatens to use force to take control of the island it claims as its own. China responded to Tsai's 2016 victory by cutting all contacts with her government and has ratcheted up economic and diplomatic pressure on the self-governing democracy. The opposition Nationalist Party, which favors closer ties with Beijing, won 15 of 22 major seats in the Nov.