Top Secret (Sort Of): The Story of How the Navy Makes Stealth Destroyers Stealth

Kris Osborn
By U.S. Navy photo - http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=77322, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=29286004

Kris Osborn

Security, Americas

What we can tell you.

Top Secret (Sort Of): The Story of How the Navy Makes Stealth Destroyers Stealth

Smith explained the rationale for the “split-delivery” acquisition of the three ships, which follow a path from commissioning, through a transport to a home port of San Diego for further combat preparation. While there are some differences between the three ships, such as the use of a steel deckhouse for the Johnson, the developmental trajectory for all three ships has been interwoven.

Eluding radar, quietly sailing into enemy territory and launching long-range precision attacks from less-detectable positions all begin to paint the picture of how a “stealthy” offensive surface destroyers could transform modern maritime warfare.

Can a massive surface destroyer, armed with Tomahawk missiles, deck-mounted guns, sensors, antennas and heat-generating onboard electrical power, truly be considered stealthy? Surely, tall, vertical masts, hull-mounted sensors and protruding antenna could never be a low-observable ship, yet performing these missions comprised the technical starting point from which engineers launched into building a first-of-its-kind stealth warship.

(This appeared earlier in 2019.)

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