Mental Health

Alabama Department of Mental Health is the state agency responsible for serving Alabama citizens with mental illnesses, intellectual disabilities, and substance use disorders. The department was formally established by ACT 881 in 1965. Annually, ADMH serves every single person in Alabama through a broad network of community mental health services and three state-operated facilities: Bryce Hospital, Mary Starke Harper Geriatric Psychiatry Center, and Taylor Hardin Secure Medical Facility.
Latest news and discussion about mental health awareness.
  • How Media Organizations Can Help Mitigate Suicide Contagion
    NPR.org

    How Media Organizations Can Help Mitigate Suicide Contagion

    Hearing about suicide can increase a person's risk of suicide. But there are ways for the media to mitigate that through responsible reporting Facebook Twitter Flipboard Email

  • Royal Mountain Records Makes Mental Health A Music Industry Priority
    www.kosu.org

    Royal Mountain Records Makes Mental Health A Music Industry Priority

    As a musician who has spent two decades on the road, Menno Versteeg of Hollerado understands the particular challenges of caring for your mental health when you make your living as an artist. There are the high-highs and low-lows of performing, being surrounded by all sorts of substances, having to deal with lots of pressure and little sleep. In fact, a number of European studies have shown that musicians are about three times more likely than the general population to struggle with mental health issues. And on top of that, being a musician is not a traditional job where insurance plans or health care resources are readily available. Versteeg is out to change that, at least on his own indie record

  • Justin Bieber is taking a break from music to focus on his mental health
    Yahoo Music

    Justin Bieber is taking a break from music to focus on his mental health

    The singer says he needs to repair "deep rooted issues" so he can "sustain" his marriage.

  • The Mental Health System Can't Stop Mass Shooters
    Psychology Today

    The Mental Health System Can't Stop Mass Shooters

    This piece was originally published in the New York Times Opinion section on February 20, 2018. A few years ago, the police brought a 21-year-old man into the crisis unit where I work as an emergency psychiatrist. His parents had called the police after seeing postings on his Facebook page that praised the Columbine shooters, referred to imminent death and destruction at his community college and promised his own “Day of Retribution.” His brother reported to the police that he had recently purchased a gun. When I interviewed the patient, he denied all of this. He had no history of mental illness and said he didn't want or need any treatment. My job was to evaluate whether he met the criteria

  • Mental health approach crucial for combating non-communicable diseases
    The Punch

    Mental health approach crucial for combating non-communicable diseases

    Adeoye Oyewole Non-communicable diseases, as opposed to communicable ones, are not contagious since they cannot be transmitted from one person to another. They are usually long term, cause death, dysfunction, and impair overall quality of life.  Risk factors such as the person's lifestyle, heredity, and the environment may be responsible for developing these non-communicable diseases. These diseases are increasingly recognised as the major cause of ill-health, disability and death. The WHO report in 2001 had indicated that NCDs account for almost 60 per cent of deaths and 46 per cent of the global burden of disease. Based on current trends, by 2020, these diseases are expected to account for

  • Compassion, understanding improve emergency care for the mentally ill at UNC Hospitals
    WRAL.com

    Compassion, understanding improve emergency care for the mentally ill at UNC Hospitals

    Chapel Hill, N.C. — Annie Snyder can remember many times when she felt helpless. "We exhausted every single resource that was available to us," she said. Snyder is the mother of a 14-year-old who suffers from multiple mental illness diagnoses including autism. When he goes into a mental health crisis, the only answer is to take him to the emergency room, which is a place she feels he can be safe. Sometimes the stay in the emergency department can last days and even weeks as her son waits for a bed at a mental health facility. "We had a couple of stays that were considered boarding, so 30 days or more," she said. This is a common story for parents of children who are dealing with mental health

  • Free Yoga for Success (Relieve Stress & Anxiety)
    Cherry Hill, NJ Patch

    Free Yoga for Success (Relieve Stress & Anxiety)

    Please RSVP at https://www.innerengineering.com/ieo-new/free-sessions/ How successful you are in life simply depends on how well you can use your mind and body. This session offers simple, but powerful yoga postures to bring stability and balance. - Can improve memory, concentration, and mental clarity - Can relieve stress and anxiety - Strengthens the spine - Takes only 5-10 minutes to practice daily Designed by Sadhguru, a self- realized yogi and foremost authority in he field of yoga. This session will be conducted by a trained Isha facilitator, after which ongoing online support will also be available.  Free and Open to All (Age 7 & up).This session is brought to you by Isha foundation, an

  • Depressed and anxious? These video games want to help
    San Francisco Chronicle

    Depressed and anxious? These video games want to help

    In the coming adventure video game “Sea of Solitude,” the main character — a young woman named Kay — navigates a partly submerged city as she faces a multitude of red-eyed scaly creatures. None are as terrifying as her own personal demons. As the game progresses, Kay realizes the creatures she is encountering are humans who turned into monsters when they became too lonely. To save herself, she fights to overcome her own loneliness. Kay was modeled after the game's creative director, Cornelia Geppert of Jo-Mei Games, an independent game studio, who struggled after a 2013 breakup. “I felt like I was trapped in a cage,” Geppert, 37, said of her experience. “Sea of Solitude,” which Redwood City's

  • Deseret News

    Utah mom of child who died after drinking methadone asks for parole

    UTAH STATE PRISON — Jill Goff admits she was "overwhelmed" by the thought of going before the Utah Board of Pardons and Parole. She knew she would have to answer questions about what happened on the day she said she mistakenly put methadone in her 2-year-old son's sippy cup, resulting in his death and sickening two of her other children. Goff, now 37, of Tooele — who failed to call paramedics right away and then failed to tell them what Aiden Laurel Goff had ingested — was convicted of child abuse homicide, a second-degree felony, and ordered to serve one to 15 years in the Utah State Prison. Goff went before a member of the Board of Pardons and Parole last week for the first time. During the

  • E! Online

    Big Sean Opens Up About Therapy & Mental Health in Empowering Message

    As a result, the star began therapy. "I got a good therapist. I was blessed enough to talk to some super spiritual people. They made me realize one thing I was missing in my life, and the one thing I was missing was clarity," he said. "I needed clarity. Clarity about who was around me, what I was doing." He went on to explain how music began to feel like a burden and the relationships in his life were toxic or struggling, like the one he had with his mother. He acknowledged that he need to nurture the relationship he had with himself in order to fix the others. 

  • medicalxpress.com

    Abused kids use text-based services to seek help, study shows

    "She says she will burn the house down with me in it." "He threatened to pull a gun on me." "He told me he could kill me in an instant if he wanted to." These are just a few of the texts sent by minors to counselors at crisis hotlines in the last several years. Abused children often look for discreet ways to seek help, hoping not to make matters worse by aggravating their perpetrator. Recently, text-based crisis communication services have started to provide an outlet for those kids. Minors aren't just using these services to report suicidal thoughts and depression—they're using them to report abuse, according to a new study in the journal JMIR mHealth and uHealth. "There was a general theory

  • Scioto Paint Valley Mental Health Center nearly doubles staff, boosting services
    Chillicothe Gazette

    Scioto Paint Valley Mental Health Center nearly doubles staff, boosting services

    CHILLICOTHE - Scioto Paint Valley Mental Health Center has nearly doubled its staff this year despite a very tight budget. When Barbara Mahaffey took over as executive director of the center in January, she saw for herself what she'd already knew from working in the field - the center was understaffed. Across its two residential facilities open at the time and five outpatient clinics, there were just 57 clinical staff. "I'm working to create a very healthy happy environment," Mahaffey said. As of last week, more than 40 additional clinical staff have been added since January across the center's network including those with the new Rulon Center which opened in February and provides inpatient drug

  • How One Company Is Using AI To Address Mental Health
    Forbes

    How One Company Is Using AI To Address Mental Health

    With the UK facing a mental health crisis, the need to find a solution has never been more urgent. Dr David Plans, who has previously helped the NHS launch one of the first apps to self-report chronic illness, believes the answer may lie with AI. He founded BioBeats in 2013 to identify stress patterns using existing sensors in smartphones and wearable devices. With investors including Will Smith and Deepak Chopra, BioBeats is enabling individuals to take preventative action against mental illness. Using wearable sensors coupled with an app, as well as a machine learning system in the cloud to detect, prevent and treat mental disorders.  it aims to allow users to understand how their body and

  • Cleveland Cavaliers F Kevin Love to receive 'Change Maker Award' for mental health advocacy from Child Mind Institute
    WKYC Cleveland

    Cleveland Cavaliers F Kevin Love to receive 'Change Maker Award' for mental health advocacy from Child Mind Institute

    CLEVELAND — Cleveland Cavaliers forward Kevin Love has tried to be a leader both on the floor for his young teammates, and off the court as an advocate for mental health. The 30-year-old Love is set to be recognized for his efforts at raising awareness for mental health issues as one of the recipients of the Change Maker Awards at the Child Mind Insitute's fifth annual ceremony at New York City's Carnegie Hall on May 1.  According to The Hollywood Reporter, Love will receive the Champion Award for his mental health advocacy. Last year, Love revealed in an essay in the Players Tribune that he has struggled with depression and anxiety. "Mental health isn't just an athlete thing. What you do for

  • De Blasio has no idea if his wife's multimillion-dollar mental health plan works
    New York Daily News

    De Blasio has no idea if his wife's multimillion-dollar mental health plan works

    The city is not tracking outcomes for nearly 75% of the programs that are part of ThriveNYC, according to Controller Scott Stringer — and the program's own staff notes it's too early to say if the pricey plan works. The startling statistic comes a day before the City Council is set to question First Lady Chirlane McCray about the effectiveness of the mental health program, which she has championed. In a letter to Thrive's top-paid employee, Susan Herman, Stringer noted that the program had provided some information after a prior request — but that many questions remain unanswered.