Tropical Storm Eta targets Florida west coast

Eta regained hurricane strength early Wednesday before weakening to a tropical storm as it is expected to make landfall again on Thursday north of Tampa - bringing with it high winds and storm surge.

Eta is the 28th named storm of the busiest Atlantic hurricane season on record, according to the National Hurricane Center.

This will be the storm’s fourth landfall after it slammed Central America, Cuba and part of the Florida Keys in recent days.

The state's west coast was under a storm surge watch on Wednesday from the Suwanee River to Bonita Beach, including Tampa Bay, where the water could rise up to 5 feet.

Tampa International Airport said on Twitter it would suspend operations at 3 PM on Wednesday due to the impending storm.

Parts of Broward County, on Florida's east coast, were still severely flooded on Wednesday, with lakes overflowed and residential streets submerged.

The National Hurricane Center said rainfall totals from Eta could add up to 20 inches in some parts of South Florida.

Video Transcript

- Eta regained hurricane strength early Wednesday before weakening to a tropical storm as it is expected to make landfall again on Thursday north of Tampa, bringing with it high winds and storm surge. Eta is the 28th named storm of the busiest Atlantic hurricane season on record, according to the National Hurricane Center. This will be the storm's fourth landfall after it slammed Central America, Cuba and part of the Florida Keys in recent days.

The state's West Coast was under a storm surge watch on Wednesday from the Suwannee River to Bonita Beach, including Tampa Bay, where the water could rise up to five feet. Tampa International Airport said on Twitter it would suspend operations at 3 PM on Wednesday due to the impending storm. Parts of Broward County, on Florida's East Coast, were still severely flooded on Wednesday, with lakes overflowed and residential streets submerged. The National Hurricane Center said rainfall totals from Eta could add up to 20 inches in some parts of South Florida.