TRUMP SAYS OF CORONAVIRUS 'THIS TOO WILL END'

TRUMP SAYS OF CORONAVIRUS 'THIS TOO WILL END'

  • Birx warns of coming coronavirus hot spots across the U.S.
    Yahoo News

    Birx warns of coming coronavirus hot spots across the U.S.

    Louisiana is poised to become the next epicenter of the coronavirus crisis, White House officials said Thursday, citing new data that shows that 26 percent of the tests for COVID-19 in that state in recent days have come back positive. The New York area remains a “very clear and important hot zone,” Dr. Deborah Birx said at Thursday's briefing of the White House coronavirus task force as she revealed testing statistics on specific states. “What we're seeing finally is testing improving,” said Birx, a renowned veteran of the HIV/AIDS fight who is now serving as the response coordinator for the coronavirus task force.

  • Two years before coronavirus, CDC warned of a coming pandemic
    Yahoo News

    Two years before coronavirus, CDC warned of a coming pandemic

    Two years ago, some of the nation's top public health officials gathered in an auditorium at Emory University in Atlanta to commemorate the 1918 influenza pandemic — also known as “the Spanish flu” — which had killed as many as 40 million people as it swept the globe. Implicit was the understanding that while the 1918 pandemic was a singular catastrophe, conditions in the 21st century were ideal for another outbreak. Long before the coronavirus emerged in Wuhan, China, and then soon spread to nearly every country on Earth, the 2018 conference offered proof that epidemiologists at the CDC and other institutions were aware that a new pandemic was poised to strike.

  • Exclusive: Navy probe to decide future of fired U.S. carrier commander
    Reuters

    Exclusive: Navy probe to decide future of fired U.S. carrier commander

    Even as he is hailed as a hero by his crew, the fired commander of a coronavirus-stricken U.S. aircraft carrier is being reassigned while investigators consider whether he should face disciplinary action, acting U.S. Navy Secretary Thomas Modly told Reuters on Friday. Captain Brett Crozier was relieved of his command of the Theodore Roosevelt on Thursday after a scathing letter in which he called on the Navy for stronger action to halt the spread of the virus aboard the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier was leaked to the media. Modly said in an interview that the letter was shared too widely and leaked before even he could see it.

  • 27 Best Home Office Decor Ideas to Keep You in the Zone
    Architectural Digest

    27 Best Home Office Decor Ideas to Keep You in the Zone

    Work from home and keep your sanity with these decor ideas that will help Originally Appeared on Architectural Digest

  • Two cats have tested positive for the novel coronavirus, but experts still don't think pets infect humans
    INSIDER

    Two cats have tested positive for the novel coronavirus, but experts still don't think pets infect humans

    Two cats — one in Belgium, the other in China — have tested positive for coronavirus in the past week. New research suggests infected felines could spread the virus to other cats, although it doesn't appear to be very transmissible. There's still no evidence it can spread from pets to humans, and experts say there's no reason for pet owners to be concerned.

  • Israel locks down ultra-Orthodox city hit hard by coronavirus
    NBC News

    Israel locks down ultra-Orthodox city hit hard by coronavirus

    Israeli police on Friday have surrounded and established roadblocks around an ultra-Orthodox Jewish city that has become a coronavirus hotspot. Police officers established roadblocks to restrict the movement in and out of Bnei Brak, where a small number of the ultra-Orthodox residents' apparent failure to comply with government social distancing requirements has prompted a dangerously high rate of contagion. Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu warned Friday that if the ministry of health deemed it necessary the same restrictions could be placed on other locations within Israel.

  • Trump announces CDC recommendation to wear masks, promptly declares he won't follow it
    The Week

    Trump announces CDC recommendation to wear masks, promptly declares he won't follow it

    President Trump is admittedly not doing everything he can to stop the spread of COVID-19. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued a recommendation for all Americans to wear cloth masks when in public around people, Trump announced at Friday's coronavirus task force press conference. Trump then repeatedly clarified that the recommendation is "voluntary," and declared that he won't be wearing a mask at all.

  • How coronavirus has halted Central American migration to the US
    The Guardian

    How coronavirus has halted Central American migration to the US

    Border closures and strict lockdowns prompted by the Covid-19 crisis have disrupted the migrant trail through Central America and Mexico, forcing some would-be migrants to postpone their journeys – and stopping many others in their tracks. The result has been a deterrent more effective than any wall Donald Trump could build. Activists across the region have reported a steep decline in the number of migrants coming from Central America since the restrictions were implemented.

  • Chinese government rejects allegations that its face masks were defective, tells countries to 'double check' instructions
    Business Insider

    Chinese government rejects allegations that its face masks were defective, tells countries to 'double check' instructions

    REUTERS/Marko Djurica The Chinese government is rebuffing the notion that its face masks exported to other countries were "defective" and suggested that the nations did not "double-check" the instructions. China's Ministry of Foreign Affairs on Thursday claimed in a tweet that the "true story" behind the alleged faulty face masks imported by the Netherlands was that the Chinese manufacturer explicitly "stated clearly that they are non-surgical." Representatives from the Chinese government in recent weeks shifted the narrative surrounding the coronavirus's origins by questioning its validity.

  • Coronavirus poses special risk to millions of Americans with diabetes
    Yahoo News

    Coronavirus poses special risk to millions of Americans with diabetes

    As the worsening coronavirus pandemic continues to spread across the country, millions of Americans living with diabetes face heightened risks from COVID-19. Around 30 million Americans have diabetes, mostly of the type II (previously called “adult-onset”) variety. A quarter of U.S. adults with diabetes are over 65, an age that has been shown to delineate increased COVID-19 mortality rates.

  • Canceling a cruise due to coronavirus? Here’s a list of updated policies
    TODAY

    Canceling a cruise due to coronavirus? Here’s a list of updated policies

    Guests with bookings between March 18 and April 11 will receive a 125% refund in future cruise credit to use through Dec. 31, 2022. Guests are also able to request a 100% refund in the original form of payment however Norwegian asks that they wait to contact until after March 23. Norwegian Cruise Line is extending CLIA travel restrictions by denying boarding to: Any passenger or crew member who has been in China, Hong Kong, Macao, South Korea, Iran or Italy within 30 days of embarkation Any passenger or crew member who has come into direct contact with anyone who has traveled from, visited, or transited in an airport in the aforementioned countries.

  • Attempts for Middle East ceasefires amid the coronavirus crisis have not stopped the fighting
    LA Times

    Attempts for Middle East ceasefires amid the coronavirus crisis have not stopped the fighting

    With governments worldwide increasing health measures to keep the spread of the deadly coronavirus at bay, one might think there would be virtually no time for waging war. Despite calls for a global ceasefire — “It's time to put armed conflict on lockdown,” said U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres in a statement in March — regional conflicts appear to be immune to the coronavirus even as more than 4,000 have died across the Middle East and almost 90,000 people have confirmed cases. In Syria, Iraq and Yemen, as authorities have shut down businesses and imposed curfews, battles between the belligerents have persisted.

  • France Has Deadliest Virus Day as Infection Rate Slows in Spain
    Bloomberg

    France Has Deadliest Virus Day as Infection Rate Slows in Spain

    France reported its deadliest day from the coronavirus amid tentative signs that the pandemic may be easing in Spain and Italy. The health ministry in Paris reported 588 hospital deaths, the most yet, bringing the figure to 5,091 since the beginning of the outbreak. In contrast, new infections slowed and fatalities declined in Spain for the first time in four days, as infections stabilized in Italy.

  • 3M pushes back at Trump over order to produce more face masks
    Yahoo News Video

    3M pushes back at Trump over order to produce more face masks

    Manufacturing giant 3M pushed back Friday against criticism from President Trump over production of face masks that are badly needed by American health care workers.

  • "Shoot them dead": Duterte orders police to kill Filipinos who defy coronavirus lockdown
    CBS News

    "Shoot them dead": Duterte orders police to kill Filipinos who defy coronavirus lockdown

    Despite that, many in a Manila slum took to the streets Wednesday to protest a lack of supplies, arguing they had not received any food packs since the lockdown started two weeks ago. "I will not hesitate my soldiers to shoot you," Duterte said in forceful tones Wednesday. On Thursday, as often happens after Duterte makes these sorts of inflammatory public remarks, Filipino officials rushed to insist that the president was simply using hyperbole to communicate the gravity of the situation.

  • Oil rockets as Trump signals end to price war
    AFP

    Oil rockets as Trump signals end to price war

    Oil prices rocketed Thursday, posting the largeset percent increase ever, after US President Donald Trump said Russia and Saudi Arabia planned to end their price war by slashing output. But the initial surge cooled after Russia denied it had spoken with Saudi Arabia, the world's biggest exporter of crude. After Trump tweeted that Saudi and Russia could slash production by up to 15 million barrels, Brent hit $36.29 a barrel, up almost 46 percent, and West Texas Intermediate soared around 35 percent to $27.39.

  • China mourns thousands who died in country's coronavirus epidemic
    Reuters

    China mourns thousands who died in country's coronavirus epidemic

    China on Saturday mourned the thousands of "martyrs" who have died in the new coronavirus outbreak, flying the national flag at half mast throughout the country and suspending all forms of entertainment. The day of mourning coincided with the start of the annual Qingming tomb-sweeping festival, when millions of Chinese families pay respects to their ancestors. In Zhongnanhai, the seat of political power in Beijing, President Xi Jinping and other Chinese leaders paid silent tribute in front of the national flag, with white flowers pinned to their chest as a mark of mourning, state media reported.

  • Elon Musk says the hospitals he sent medical machines to all confirmed they were 'critical' and traditional ventilators are arriving shortly
    Business Insider

    Elon Musk says the hospitals he sent medical machines to all confirmed they were 'critical' and traditional ventilators are arriving shortly

    REUTERS/Mike Blake/File Picture Elon Musk was criticized on Thursday for apparently sending BiPAP machines, not the life-support ventilators most-needed to save coronavirus patients, to a New York hospital. New York City Hospitals thanked Musk and Tesla in a tweet for sending "40 ventilators" to a hospital in Queens, but the photo appears to show a BiPAP machine, which is more commonly used for sleep apnea. Some medical experts have warned that CPAP and BiPAP machines could be harmful in treating coronavirus patients by potentially spreading the disease.

  • In Ecuador, families wait with their dead as bodies pile up
    Associated Press

    In Ecuador, families wait with their dead as bodies pile up

    Hospitals are turning away patients and bodies are being left on streets and in homes for days in Guayaquil, a normally bustling city of 2.6 million that has become a hot spot in Latin America as the coronavirus pandemic spreads. The small South American nation has recorded 120 coronavirus deaths, but officials say there could be dozens more who died without ever being officially diagnosed — people like Larrea, who had all the symptoms, but never got tested. Nationwide, there were 3,160 cases confirmed on Thursday, likely a vast underestimate.

  • 10 Great Deals on Apparel From REI’s 25% off Sale
    Popular Mechanics

    10 Great Deals on Apparel From REI’s 25% off Sale

    Act fast to score discounts on Patagonia, Nike, Smartwool, and more. From Popular Mechanics

  • Here's How the Army Will Pay New Recruits Who Can’t Get to Basic Training
    Military.com

    Here's How the Army Will Pay New Recruits Who Can’t Get to Basic Training

    The 1,400 recruits on hold because of the novel coronavirus pandemic may be eligible to be paid as privates under the new Future Soldier to Active Duty Program, U.S. Army Recruiting Command announced Thursday. "The majority of the delays are in areas experiencing the largest COVID-19 outbreaks: the New York City metropolitan area, the northeast United States, southern California, south Florida and Seattle," Lisa Ferguson, a spokeswoman for Recruiting Command, told Military.com. The program will pay future soldiers about $1,600 -- the base pay of an active-duty private -- as long as they have had their basic training dates rescheduled based on the virus risk level in their area, according to an April 2 news release posted on the command's website.

  • A California ER nurse told her family that if she gets COVID-19 she doesn't want a ventilator and to give it to someone else who needs it more
    INSIDER

    A California ER nurse told her family that if she gets COVID-19 she doesn't want a ventilator and to give it to someone else who needs it more

    An emergency room nurse told Insider she wouldn't take a ventilator if she were to be infected with coronavirus and to save it for others who may need it more. An emergency room nurse working in Southern California told Insider, the pandemic had forced her to have some difficult conversations with her family. Paige, who asked to conceal her last name said while she's found it too difficult to have the conversation with her 86-year-old father, she's discussed how she wants her family to deal with her death if she were to be infected and die from the coronavirus with her sisters.

  • Mexico murder rate reaches new high as violence rages amid Covid-19 spread
    The Guardian

    Mexico murder rate reaches new high as violence rages amid Covid-19 spread

    Photograph: Sergio Maldonado/Reuters Mexico s homicide rate raced to a new record in March, as violence raged even as Covid-19 spread across the country and authorities urged the population to stay home and practise social distancing. Mexico registered 2,585 homicides in March – the highest monthly figure since records began in 1997 – putting 2020 on track to break last year's record total for murders. The surge in killings comes as federal and state officials put resources into containing the Covid-19 crisis and confront the prospect of an already sluggish economy falling even further – potentially deepening the misery for the more than 40% of the population living in poverty.

  • ‘Inexcusable’: Dr. Sanjay Gupta Goes Off on Georgia Governor’s ‘Stunning’ Coronavirus Admission
    The Daily Beast

    ‘Inexcusable’: Dr. Sanjay Gupta Goes Off on Georgia Governor’s ‘Stunning’ Coronavirus Admission

    Dr. Sanjay Gupta was visibly furious on Thursday afternoon as he watched footage of Georgia's Republican Gov. Brian Kemp defend his delayed response to the coronavirus pandemic by claiming that he had just found out it can be transmitted asymptomatically. “Those individuals could have been infecting people before they ever felt bad, but we didn't know that until the last 24 hours,” Kemp said on Wednesday when he finally announced a state-wide shelter-in-place order. “I'm really kind of stunned by what he said, because we've known that for quite some time, haven't we?” anchor Anderson Cooper said to his CNN colleague.

  • Coronavirus: Nearly 1,500 Americans killed in 24 hours, the worst single-day death surge in the world
    The Telegraph

    Coronavirus: Nearly 1,500 Americans killed in 24 hours, the worst single-day death surge in the world

    The United States recorded nearly 1,500 deaths from the coronavirus in the past 24 hours, the worst 24-hour death toll globally since the pandemic began. According to figures from Johns Hopkins University, 1,480 deaths were counted between Thursday morning and Friday morning, and the total number of people who have died since the start of the pandemic in the US is now 7,406. It comes as Donald Trump advised all Americans to wear masks in public to protect against the virus over fears that the illness that has infected more than one million people worldwide may be spreading by normal breathing.