Trump will win in 2020 if US economy remains strong: Donald Luskin

Trend Macrolytics CIO Donald Luskin says President Trump will win in 2020, as long as the U.S. economy remains strong.

  • 2020 Vision Monday: Polls show a 17-point swing toward impeaching Trump, which could drag down his reelection bid
    Yahoo News

    2020 Vision Monday: Polls show a 17-point swing toward impeaching Trump, which could drag down his reelection bid

    As of three weeks ago, a majority of Americans — 51.1 percent, on average — opposed impeaching President Trump. As of today, opposition to impeachment has plummeted 7 percentage points (to 44 percent) and support has climbed nearly 10 points (to 49.8 percent), according to FiveThirtyEight's preliminary polling tracker. It still seems unlikely, although perhaps slightly less so, that Senate Republicans will ever abandon Trump and vote to remove him from office, even if most voters eventually want them to.

  • Hong Kong's leader: Territory not becoming a police state
    Associated Press

    Hong Kong's leader: Territory not becoming a police state

    Hong Kong's leader said Tuesday that "it's totally irresponsible and unfounded" to suggest the semi-autonomous Chinese territory is becoming a police state as her government grapples with protests now in their fifth month. In a spirited defense of Hong Kong's 30,000-strong police force and her handling of the protests in response to criticism from visiting U.S. senators, Carrie Lam challenged the notion that the territory is losing its freedoms, unique in China, as police battle demonstrators in the streets. "I would challenge every politician to ask themselves if the large extent of violent acts, and all those petrol bombs and arson and deadly attacks on policemen, happened in their own country, what would they do?

  • In Jamal Khashoggi's death, Saudi money is talking louder than murder
    USA TODAY Opinion

    In Jamal Khashoggi's death, Saudi money is talking louder than murder

    Anyone interested in what it looks like to get away with murder should peruse the attendee list for Saudi Arabia's flashy "Davos in the Desert" this month. Vaporizing into the desert heat is all the righteous alarm that compelled leading financial firms to boycott the event last year out of concern that Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, weeks before, had ordered the grisly killing of Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi. Attending this year's extravaganza are executives of JPMorgan Chase, Goldman Sachs and Citigroup, all of them institutions selected to underwrite the kingdom's highly anticipated, partial public offering of its oil company, Aramco, valued $1.5 trillion to $2 trillion.

  • Climate change researchers recommend banning all frequent flyer reward programs to cut carbon emissions by targeting jet-setters
    Business Insider

    Climate change researchers recommend banning all frequent flyer reward programs to cut carbon emissions by targeting jet-setters

    A new report commissioned by the Committee on Climate Change, the UK government's official climate-change advisers, has called for a ban on all frequent flyer reward programs to discourage people from traveling by air so much. Researchers from Imperial College London, who wrote the report, said that just 15% of the entire British population take 70% of all flights from the country. The report also called for an "air miles levy" to punish people who fly long distances, which would target those who rack up the most air miles, rather than people who travel shorter distances.

  • How Democrats might go after Vice President Pence if he doesn't meet document deadline
    USA TODAY

    How Democrats might go after Vice President Pence if he doesn't meet document deadline

    WASHINGTON – If Vice President Mike Pence doesn't comply with House Democrats' request to turn over by Tuesday documents related to the Trump administration's actions on Ukraine, Democrats have said that refusal can be used as evidence to impeach the president. Pence, himself, could also face repercussions. Those range from a more probable next step – Pence is subpoenaed – to the most extreme route that experts say Democrats are unlikely to pursue: Pence is also impeached.

  • Soldier wounded during search for Bowe Bergdahl dies of his injuries
    The Telegraph

    Soldier wounded during search for Bowe Bergdahl dies of his injuries

    A US soldier shot in the head during the 2009 search for army deserter Bowe Bergdahl has died from his injuries. Army Master Sgt. Mark Allen died on Saturday at the age of 46, 10 years after being injured in the hunt for his missing comrade. He spent 21 years in the army and national guard, and retired in 2013 on receiving the Purple Heart.

  • 'Do the right thing,' family of UK teen killed in crash tells U.S. diplomat's wife
    Reuters

    'Do the right thing,' family of UK teen killed in crash tells U.S. diplomat's wife

    The parents of a British teenager killed in a car crash involving a U.S. diplomat's wife vowed on Monday to keep fighting until they get justice for their son after the American woman returned to the United States following the accident. Charlotte Charles and Tim Dunn spoke to media in New York during a visit intended put pressure on the Trump administration to have Anne Sacoolas to be sent back to face British investigators. "She needs to just do the right thing and just come back and face what she's done," said Charles, her voice breaking with emotion.

  • Russia denies US news report it bombed 4 Syria hospitals in 12 hours
    AFP

    Russia denies US news report it bombed 4 Syria hospitals in 12 hours

    Russia on Monday denied a US newspaper report that its warplanes bombed four hospitals in rebel-held territory in Syria over a period of 12 hours this year. The Russian defence ministry rubbished the claim in a report by The New York Times, saying "the alleged 'evidence' provided by the NYT is not worth even the paper it was printed on". The May strikes -- which the newspaper tied to Moscow through Russian radio recordings, plane spotter logs and accounts by witnesses -- are part of a larger pattern of medical facilities targeted by forces supporting Syrian President Bashar al-Assad in the country's devastating civil war.

  • The National Interest

    With Hypersonic Missiles, Israel's F-35s Are Upping The Ante In Syria

    Key point: The Middle East's skies belong to Israel. Israel will soon have a new precision-guided supersonic stand-off missile for its F-35s and other fighter jets. The new missile was announced on June 11, 2018 in a press release by two leading Israeli defense firms, Israeli Military Industries Systems (IMI Systems) and Israel Aerospace Industries, which jointly developed the missile.

  • View Photos of Our Sports Sedan Battle Between the Dodge Charger and Kia Stinger GT
    Car and Driver

    View Photos of Our Sports Sedan Battle Between the Dodge Charger and Kia Stinger GT

    America's leading (and only) V-8 muscle sedan takes on Korea's upstart rear-drive hatchback in a battle of power versus poise. From Car and Driver

  • Flooded bullet trains show Japan's risks from disasters
    Associated Press

    Flooded bullet trains show Japan's risks from disasters

    Experts say they also instill a false sense of security in a country inured to danger by the constant threat of calamitous earthquakes, tsunami and volcanos. "Weather conditions in Japan up to now have been relatively moderate," said Toshitaka Katada, a disaster expert and professor at the University of Tokyo. Those days are over, and Japan's readiness for disasters, still based on data collected decades ago, hasn't kept up with the times, he said.

  • Kamala Harris’s Offices Fought Payments to Wrongly Convicted
    Bloomberg

    Kamala Harris’s Offices Fought Payments to Wrongly Convicted

    It took 19 years for his conviction to be reversed -- and two more years for the State of California to grant him compensation for the time he was wrongfully imprisoned. Diaz's battle with Harris' office began in 2012 when a judge reversed his conviction. As state attorney general, her staff vigorously resisted his claim for compensation and tried to make him re-register as a sex offender, despite a formal ruling in April 2013 that he was innocent.

  • Trump suggested the Kurds were releasing ISIS prisoners, but US officials say Turkish-backed forces are actually doing this
    Business Insider

    Trump suggested the Kurds were releasing ISIS prisoners, but US officials say Turkish-backed forces are actually doing this

    Turkish-backed Syrian Arab forces have deliberately released ISIS prisoners amid Turkey's invasion into northern Syria, two US officials told Foreign Policy. This report contradicts Trump's suggestion Kurdish forces released prisoners to draw the US back into the region following his controversial decision to pull troops out. Trump's decision to abandon the Kurds, who bore the brunt of the campaign against ISIS, has sparked widespread criticism — including rare blowback from congressional Republicans.

  • When police misconduct occurs, records often stay secret. One mom's fight to change that.
    USA TODAY

    When police misconduct occurs, records often stay secret. One mom's fight to change that.

    Furious about the way she was treated, she worked with other families whose relatives were killed by police to help push for the recent passage of California's new Senate Bill 1421, which as of January 1 overrides decades of precedent and requires police departments to open internal investigation records related to deadly force and police wrongdoing. The law could inspire reform at police departments across the nation at a time when the relationship between police and the public is fraught with tension following numerous fatal shootings, particularly involving victims of color.

  • Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez faces backlash over haircut
    Yahoo News Video

    Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez faces backlash over haircut

    This week, the Washington Times published a story saying that Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y. had spent $80 on a haircut and $180 on color at a Washington, D.C., salon, a choice the newspaper presented as hypocritical, given she “regularly rails against the rich and complains about the cost of living inside the Beltway.

  • Nancy Pelosi doesn't have to hold House impeachment inquiry vote. But the speaker should.
    USA TODAY Opinion

    Nancy Pelosi doesn't have to hold House impeachment inquiry vote. But the speaker should.

    Let's be clear, if the House of Representatives wants to launch an impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump's conduct, it need not hold a formal vote. The White House argument that failing to do so somehow violates the Constitution is entirely made up. The House has few responsibilities more grave than drawing up articles of impeachment for removing a president — in this case, for abusing powers of his office to pressure a foreign power to dig up dirt on a political opponent.

  • Anthony Scaramucci is desperately trying to recruit Mitt Romney for a 2020 run
    The Week

    Anthony Scaramucci is desperately trying to recruit Mitt Romney for a 2020 run

    Sen. Mitt Romney (R-Utah) is running for president again — at least in Anthony Scaramucci's dreams. The famously short-lived White House communications director has since turned on the president who appointed him, and has publicly said he's trying to knock President Trump off the 2020 ticket. Now, it seems Scaramucci has decided on his dream candidate, and has launched a website and line of T-shirts to persuade him to run.

  • Reuters

    Vaping illness, deaths likely very rare beyond U.S., experts say

    E-cigarette or vaping-linked lung injuries that have killed 29 and sickened more than 1,000 people in the United States are likely to be rare in Britain and other countries where the suspect products are not widely used, specialists said on Monday. Experts in toxicology and addiction said they are sure that the 1,299 confirmed and probable American cases of serious lung injuries linked to vaping are "a U.S.-specific phenomenon," and there is no evidence of a similar pattern of illness in Britain or elsewhere. "What's happening in the U.S. is not happening here (in Britain), nor is it happening in any other countries where vaping is common," said John Britton, a professor and respiratory medicine consultant and director of the UK Centre for Tobacco & Alcohol Studies at Nottingham University.

  • China inflation surges as pork prices soar
    AFP

    China inflation surges as pork prices soar

    China's consumer inflation accelerated at its fastest pace in almost six years in September as African swine fever sent pork prices soaring nearly 70 percent, official data showed Tuesday. Authorities have gone as far as tapping the nation's pork reserve to control prices of the staple meat, as the swine fever crisis could become a political and economic liability for the state. The consumer price index (CPI) -- a key gauge of retail inflation -- hit 3.0 percent last month, the National Bureau of Statistics (NBS) said, up from 2.8 percent in August and the highest since since November 2013.

  • Family ends search for missing CEO after a body is found
    Associated Press

    Family ends search for missing CEO after a body is found

    The family of a missing Utah tech executive has called off a search for her after police reported that a body was found inside a parked car in the San Francisco Bay Area. Police in San Jose said the body was discovered Saturday in an area where Erin Valenti's family had been searching. "While we were praying for a different outcome, we are so appreciative for the help and support you have given," according to a Facebook post by the group Help Find Erin Valenti.

  • Man Convicted in Murder of Law Professor Locked in Family Feud
    The New York Times

    Man Convicted in Murder of Law Professor Locked in Family Feud

    The killing shook Florida's capital and stunned the international legal community: A prominent law professor locked in a rancorous battle with his ex-wife and in-laws was gunned down in his garage, in what prosecutors depicted as a murder-for-hire plot. State prosecutors charged three people with the murder of the professor, Dan Markel, hoping to pressure them into revealing whoever may have financed the murder. Two of the accused, Sigfredo Garcia and Katherine Magbanua, maintained their innocence and went to trial late last month, five years after the professor's death.

  • Polls show a 17-point swing toward impeaching Trump
    Yahoo News Video

    Polls show a 17-point swing toward impeaching Trump

    As of three weeks ago, a majority of Americans, 51.1 percent, on average, opposed impeaching President Trump, with only 40 percent supporting it. But the results came before the Ukraine scandal snowballed. As of today, opposition to impeachment has plummeted 7 percentage points (to 44 percent) and support has climbed nearly 10 points (to 49.8 percent), according to FiveThirtyEight's preliminary polling tracker.

  • Disney Skyliner reopens with modified hours after stranding passengers last week
    USA TODAY

    Disney Skyliner reopens with modified hours after stranding passengers last week

    Disney's Skyliner is up and running again with modified service after the new aerial cable car system stranded passengers for hours the night of Oct. 5. "Beginning today, guests may travel aboard Disney Skyliner from 8 a.m. to 10:30 p.m.," reads an update on Walt Disney World Resort's Skyliner landing page. "Following a complete review with the manufacturer, we've made adjustments to our processes and training, and we are improving how we communicate with guests during their flight with Disney Skyliner," Thomas Smith, editorial content director at Disney Parks, wrote in a blog post on Monday.

  • Vulnerable Trump Gives Democrats an Opening
    Bloomberg

    Vulnerable Trump Gives Democrats an Opening

    U.S. Democratic presidential aspirants take the debate stage in Ohio tonight armed with a battery of fresh ammunition against Donald Trump. Trump's would-be challengers will be targeting a president who's the subject of a deepening House impeachment inquiry and whose whiplash foreign policy in Syria is drawing withering criticism, even from some in his own party. Look for Democrats to capitalize on bipartisan anger at Trump's decision to withdraw U.S. troops from Syria — a move that paved the way for a Turkish military offensive — especially since penalties subsequently imposed on Turkey were milder than lawmakers demanded.

  • Law and Justice party wins one of largest victories in Poland's democratic history
    The Telegraph

    Law and Justice party wins one of largest victories in Poland's democratic history

    The leader of Poland's governing party has vowed his party will carrying on changing Poland “for the better” after it romped to one of the biggest wins in the country's modern democratic history in Sunday's general election. Law and Justice scooped 43.59 per cent of the vote, around 16 per cent more than the Civic Coalition, a centrist grouping, while a left-wing bloc came third with 12.56 per cent. The turnout of 61 per cent was the highest in three decades. If nothing changes Law and Justice will get about 236 seats, giving it a slender majority.