Tucker Carlson's NSA 'spying' scandal gets Russia connection

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Tucker Carlson acknowledged a Russia element to his public accusation that the Biden administration was "spying" on his communications.

The Fox News host said on Wednesday that his emails related to scheduling an interview with Russian President Vladimir Putin were the subject of the warning by a government "whistleblower" he first mentioned late last month when he made explosive charges against the National Security Agency.

"Late this spring I contacted a couple of people I thought could help us get an interview with the Russian President Vladimir Putin. I told nobody I was doing this other than my executive producer," he said after insisting there was "nothing scandalous" in them.

He added later: "The Biden administration found out anyway by reading my emails." He also said the NSA sought to paint him as a "disloyal American."

REVEALED: TUCKER CARLSON'S FOIA REQUEST TO NSA

Carlson made the comments a couple hours after Axios published a report in which sources said the government learned Carlson was in talks with U.S.-based Kremlin intermediaries about setting up an interview with Putin.

The host got wind of it, the report said, shortly before he told his audience of millions late on June 28 about his government source informing him of an NSA scheme to leak his team's electronic communications to take his show off the air.

The NSA released a rare public statement on June 29 saying Carlson was "never" a target of the agency and denied a plot to get Carlson's show taken off the air. However, the statement did not preclude the possibility any communications were incidentally collected.

Carlson told his audience on Wednesday that the day before he learned that "sources in the so-called intelligence community" told at least one reporter in Washington about the contents of his emails.

News outlets often seek interviews with world leaders. NBC News conducted one with Putin last month before he met with President Joe Biden for a summit in Geneva.

"We support any of our hosts pursuing interviews and stories free of government interference," a Fox News spokesperson said.

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In explaining why he sought an interview with Putin, Carlson said on Wednesday the Russian leader is "newsworthy." Carlson also said he decided to keep his overtures "quiet" over concerns that publicity would "rattle the Russians" and hurt his chances for an interview.

The report published on Wednesday stressed Axios had not confirmed whether any of Carlson's communications were actually intercepted.

"If I had specific info on Tucker’s communication I would publish it. If I had info on an intel report/unmasking I would publish it. I don’t. I published everything I could confirm so far. The piece lays out different scenarios & raises questions we are still chasing," tweeted Jonathan Swan, the author of the report.

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Tags: News, NSA, Tucker Carlson, Fox News, Media

Original Author: Daniel Chaitin

Original Location: Tucker Carlson's NSA 'spying' scandal gets Russia connection

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