Tucson water reassures people their tap is safe

Tucson water says their is no need to hoard bottled water because their water is safe to drink and reliable.

  • Suspected SARS virus and flu samples found in luggage: FBI report describes China's 'biosecurity risk'
    Yahoo News

    Suspected SARS virus and flu samples found in luggage: FBI report describes China's 'biosecurity risk'

    In late November 2018, just over a year before the first coronavirus case was identified in Wuhan, China, U.S. Customs and Border Protection agents at Detroit Metro Airport stopped a Chinese biologist with three vials labeled “Antibodies” in his luggage. The biologist told the agents that a colleague in China had asked him to deliver the vials to a researcher at a U.S. institute. “Inspection of the writing on the vials and the stated recipient led inspection personnel to believe the materials contained within the vials may be viable Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) materials,” says an unclassified FBI tactical intelligence report obtained by Yahoo News.

  • Trump says Democrats' push for expanded voting threatens Republicans
    Yahoo News

    Trump says Democrats' push for expanded voting threatens Republicans

    President Trump on Monday criticized attempts by Democrats in Congress to expand voting access for the presidential election in the fall, saying increased voter turnout would keep Republicans from getting elected. Trump said that Democrat-proposed voting reforms to the $2.2 trillion rescue package passed last week by Congress — which were largely cut from the deal — would have led to “levels of voting, that if you ever agreed to it you'd never have a Republican elected in this country again.” Democrats have pushed to mandate that states make plans to expand early voting and mail-in balloting for the fall election, in the event that the coronavirus pandemic makes in-person voting unsafe.

  • IG Horowitz Found ‘Apparent Errors or Inadequately Supported Facts’ in Every Single FBI FISA Application He Reviewed
    National Review

    IG Horowitz Found ‘Apparent Errors or Inadequately Supported Facts’ in Every Single FBI FISA Application He Reviewed

    The Justice Department inspector general said it does “not have confidence” in the FBI's FISA application process following an audit that found the Bureau was not sufficiently transparent with the court in 29 applications from 2014 to 2019, all of which included “apparent errors or inadequately supported facts.” Inspector General Michael Horowitz released a report in December which found that the FBI included “at least 17 significant errors or omissions in the Carter Page FISA applications and many errors in the Woods Procedures” during its Crossfire Hurricane investigation of the 2016 Trump campaign.

  • Boy, 5, found dead near hiking trail after mother said they got lost
    NBC News

    Boy, 5, found dead near hiking trail after mother said they got lost

    The body of a 5-year-old boy was discovered near an Alaskan trail after his mother said they got lost during a hike. A ground search team found the child, Jaxson Brown, around 2:45 p.m. on Saturday, three days after he and his mother went for a hike along Lunch Creek Trail in Ketchikan. The boy's mother, Jennifer Treat, told Alaska State Troopers that she and Jaxson went on a hike Wednesday afternoon.

  • Cuomo: Rate of hospitalizations decreasing
    Yahoo News Video

    Cuomo: Rate of hospitalizations decreasing

    New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said on Monday that the rate of hospitalizations because of the coronavirus pandemic is slowing in the state.

  • Democratic lawmakers call for racial data in virus testing
    Associated Press

    Democratic lawmakers call for racial data in virus testing

    Democratic lawmakers are calling out an apparent lack of racial data that they say is needed to monitor and address disparities in the national response to the coronavirus outbreak. In a letter sent Friday to Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar, Sen. Elizabeth Warren and Rep. Ayanna Pressley, both from Massachusetts, said comprehensive demographic data on people who are tested or treated for the virus that causes COVID-19 does not exist. “Any attempt to contain COVID-19 in the United States will have to address its potential spread in low-income communities of color, first and foremost to protect the lives of people in those communities, but also to slow the spread of the virus in the country as a whole,” the lawmakers wrote to Azar.

  • Indian police fire tear gas at jobless workers defying coronavirus lockdown
    Reuters

    Indian police fire tear gas at jobless workers defying coronavirus lockdown

    Police in India fired tear gas to disperse a stone-pelting crowd of migrant workers defying a three-week lockdown against the coronavirus that has left hundreds of thousands of poor without jobs and hungry, authorities said on Monday. Prime Minister Narendra Modi ordered the country's 1.3 billion people to remain indoors until April 15, declaring such self-isolation was the only hope to stop the viral pandemic. But the vast shutdown has triggered a humanitarian crisis, with hundreds of thousands of poor migrant laborers employed in big cities such as Delhi and Mumbai seeking to head to their homes in the countryside on foot after losing their jobs.

  • The Justice Department is reportedly investigating actions by US lawmakers who dumped stocks before the market plunged over coronavirus fears
    Business Insider

    The Justice Department is reportedly investigating actions by US lawmakers who dumped stocks before the market plunged over coronavirus fears

    Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images The Justice Department is investigating the actions of US lawmakers who dumped stocks before the market plunged amid coronavirus fears, CNN reported. According to the report, the investigation is still in its early stages and the DOJ is working with the Securities and Exchange Commission on the matter. As part of the probe, the FBI has reportedly reached out to North Carolina Sen. Richard Burr, who dumped up to $1.72 million in stocks before the market tanked.

  • India manhunt after Islamic gathering becomes virus hotspot
    AFP

    India manhunt after Islamic gathering becomes virus hotspot

    A large religious gathering in New Delhi has sparked a manhunt across India for suspected coronavirus cases after being linked to dozens of infections and several deaths. The gathering emerged as one of India's major virus hotspots after thousands flocked to an Islamic religious centre in the Nizamuddin West neighbourhood of Delhi. Some returned home to other states after the gathering, but many remained in the vicinity, saying they were trapped because public transport had been shut down due to the virus.

  • Fact check: will Covid-19 fade in the summer – then return later like the flu?
    The Guardian

    Fact check: will Covid-19 fade in the summer – then return later like the flu?

    Dr Marc Lipsitch: What makes seasonal viruses seasonal is a combination of opportunities for transmission – whether school is in term, which facilitates transmission – and what proportion of the population is immune, combined with weather. Humidity is lower in the winter, which is good for transmission. Low humidity makes [virus-carrying] droplets settle more slowly because they shrink to smaller sizes and then friction keeps them in the air, whereas high humidity doesn't do that.

  • Coronavirus: Trump is forcing doctors to decide who lives or dies and can do ‘much more’ to protect medics, Pelosi says
    The Independent

    Coronavirus: Trump is forcing doctors to decide who lives or dies and can do ‘much more’ to protect medics, Pelosi says

    House Speaker Nancy Pelosi slammed Donald Trump for what she called his resistance to “do much more” to protect medical workers from contracting coronavirus. Ms Pelosi did applaud Mr Trump for reversing course on opening parts of the country by 12 April, saying without such changes by the administration “there will be more deaths.” Thought Mr Trump has been widely panned for saying he takes no responsibility for the outbreak in the United States, the speaker was asked on “Morning Joe” if Congress has any responsibility for the slow and uneven federal response.

  • Wuhan Residents Dismiss Official Coronavirus Death Toll: ‘The Incinerators Have Been Working Around the Clock’
    National Review

    Wuhan Residents Dismiss Official Coronavirus Death Toll: ‘The Incinerators Have Been Working Around the Clock’

    Wuhan residents are increasingly skeptical of the Chinese Communist Party's reported coronavirus death count of approximately 2,500 deaths in the city to date, with most people believing the actual number is at least 40,000. “Maybe the authorities are gradually releasing the real figures, intentionally or unintentionally, so that people will gradually come to accept the reality,” a Wuhan resident, who gave only his surname Mao, told Radio Free Asia. A city source added that, based on the aggregation of funeral and cremation numbers, authorities likely know the real number and are keeping it under wraps.

  • One country is refusing to shut down to stop the coronavirus
    NBC News

    One country is refusing to shut down to stop the coronavirus

    While officials from Montreal to Moscow have placed populations under some form of lockdown designed to slow the spread of the coronavirus, one man continues to hold firm to the notion that the rest of the world has lost its mind: Belarusian President Alexander Lukashenko. “It is better to die on your feet than live on your knees!” Lukashenko told a Belarusian television reporter Saturday when asked whether the coronavirus could stop him from hitting the rink for a propaganda-filled hockey game. Lukashenko, one of the longest-serving leaders in the former Soviet Union, has been in power for over 25 years.

  • Open coffins are left on roads to remind people to stay inside while soldiers shoot disinfectant from water cannons. Here's what lockdown for 57 million people in the Philippines looks like.
    INSIDER

    Open coffins are left on roads to remind people to stay inside while soldiers shoot disinfectant from water cannons. Here's what lockdown for 57 million people in the Philippines looks like.

    Ezra Acayan/Getty The Philippines' main island Luzon, which has a population of more than 57 million, is on lockdown. Along with people's movements being restricted, soldiers are covering residents and the streets in disinfectant, and open coffins have been left on the roads as a warning to people to stay inside. On Sunday, the Philippines reported 343 new coronavirus cases in a day — its highest one day increase yet.

  • Fit, healthy 33-year-old recounts falling ill to coronavirus
    Associated Press

    Fit, healthy 33-year-old recounts falling ill to coronavirus

    Still, Napoli, a lawyer in Rome, developed a cough and fever less than a week after Italy's premier locked down the entire nation, including the capital which had continued life as usual while the virus raged in the north. Until that day, Napoli was following his routine of work, jogging and swimming. He received a positive diagnosis for COVID-19 three days later.

  • Reuters

    Iran says natgas exports to Turkey halted after attack by "terrorists"

    Iran said on Tuesday its natural gas exports to Turkey have stopped after an attack on a pipeline inside the neighbouring country, an Iranian official told state TV. This morning, terrorists attacked a natural gas pipeline inside Turkey near Iran's Bazargan border with Turkey ... Flow of gas has been halted," said Mehdi Jamshidi-Dana, director of National Iranian Gas Co. "The pipeline has exploded several times in the past.

  • 29 Best Closet Organization Ideas to Maximize Space and Style
    Architectural Digest

    29 Best Closet Organization Ideas to Maximize Space and Style

    How to organize your closet like a pro Originally Appeared on Architectural Digest

  • 3 mild symptoms could predict which coronavirus patients develop severe lung disease, research suggests — including body aches
    Business Insider

    3 mild symptoms could predict which coronavirus patients develop severe lung disease, research suggests — including body aches

    Getty Images Related Video: What COVID-19 Symptoms Look Like, Day by Day The coronavirus pandemic has forced doctors to make difficult decisions about which patients get immediate medical care. In New York City, where more than 38,000 cases have been reported, hospitals are reserving tests for patients with severe illness, while patients with mild cases — which can still be painful and long-lasting — have been told to stay home. But doctors still know very little about the symptoms that serve as warning signs in the lead-up to a severe case of COVID-19.

  • Israel's ultra-Orthodox Jews in fight over virus rules
    AFP

    Israel's ultra-Orthodox Jews in fight over virus rules

    Israeli police with face masks and batons and backed by surveillance helicopters have stepped up patrols of ultra-Orthodox Jewish neighbourhoods that have become coronavirus hotspots. This week has seen tense altercations, and some rabbis have admitted that their communities, where prayer and scripture study are traditionally communal, are not observing new social distancing regulations. A few days ago in Bnei Brak, a city near Tel Aviv with a largely ultra-Orthodox population, hundreds of faithful crowded together to attend the funeral of prominent rabbi Tzi Shenkar.

  • Kremlin Fights U.S. Sanctions, Backs Maduro in Rosneft Deal
    Bloomberg

    Kremlin Fights U.S. Sanctions, Backs Maduro in Rosneft Deal

    The Kremlin's sudden shift of ownership of multi-billion-dollar oil projects in Venezuela shields oil giant Rosneft PJSC from further U.S. sanctions but keeps Moscow firmly behind embattled President Nicolas Maduro amid a wider stand-off with Washington. Russia is not walking away from Maduro and will seek to thwart U.S. efforts to depose him,” said Vladimir Frolov, a former diplomat and foreign policy analyst in Moscow. Moscow is just shielding Rosneft from sanctions which could result in a blanket embargo on all Rosneft exports.

  • No, America’s Response to Coronavirus Isn’t the Worst in the World
    National Review

    No, America’s Response to Coronavirus Isn’t the Worst in the World

    Yet, when the political media isn't preoccupied with a gotcha du jour, pundits, partisans, and journalists have seemed downright giddy to let their minions know that the United States now has the most coronavirus cases in the world. It took a six-siren-emoji tweet from MSNBC's Joe Scarborough to tell us that fact. Here is how the New York Times' Paul Krugman framed the number: A Nobel Prize–winning economist surely understands that we don't have enough data to definitively declare the United States the world leader in cases.

  • Rep. Velazquez has presumed COVID-19 infection, was near Pelosi, other lawmakers last week
    NBC News

    Rep. Velazquez has presumed COVID-19 infection, was near Pelosi, other lawmakers last week

    Rep. Nydia Velazquez said Monday that she's been "diagnosed with presumed coronavirus infection," three days after she spoke on the House floor and stood near 80-year-old House Speaker Nancy Pelosi during the signing of the $2.2 trillion coronavirus stimulus bill. In a statement, Velazquez, D-N.Y., 67, said she first started feeling sick "in the wee hours of Sunday morning." At the advice of The Attending Physician, neither COVID 19 laboratory testing nor a doctor's office visit was recommended.

  • Coronavirus: New York bar owner becomes first to be arrested for ignoring lockdown
    The Independent

    Coronavirus: New York bar owner becomes first to be arrested for ignoring lockdown

    The owner of a bar in New York City has been arrested for operating in contravention of the city's coronavirus lockdown measures. New York police confirmed on Monday that 56-year-old Vasil Pando had been arrested on Saturday night at an address in Brooklyn. Around a dozen people were found drinking, gambling, and flouting guidelines on social distancing when NYPD officers arrived.

  • Taliban team arrives in Kabul to monitor prisoner release
    Associated Press

    Taliban team arrives in Kabul to monitor prisoner release

    A three-member Taliban technical team arrived Tuesday in the Afghan capital to monitor the release of their prisoners as part of a peace deal signed by the Taliban and the U.S., a spokesman for the insurgent group said. Taliban spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid confirmed the team's arrival in a tweet. It marked the first time a Taliban delegation has been in Kabul since the group was driven out by the U.S. -led coalition in November 2001.

  • 'The watermelons will rot:' U.S. visa confusion in Mexico keeps out agriculture workers
    Reuters

    'The watermelons will rot:' U.S. visa confusion in Mexico keeps out agriculture workers

    Restricted visa services, quickly evolving regulations and increased border controls risk wider labor shortages in the United States produce industry that may leave grocery stores scrambling for fruits and vegetables as spring and summer harvests spread across the United States. On Thursday, more than 100 workers waited in a stifling park in the center of Monterrey, Mexico, backpacks and rolling suitcases in hand, for news about their H-2A temporary agriculture worker visas.