Tulsa Officials Provide Coronavirus Update April 29

Tulsa Officials Provide Coronavirus Update April 29

  • U.S. Ambassador to Germany Grenell to step down: dpa
    Reuters

    U.S. Ambassador to Germany Grenell to step down: dpa

    U.S. Ambassador to Germany Richard Grenell is planning to step down in the coming weeks after little more than two years in the job, German news agency dpa reported on Sunday, without saying where it obtained the information. Robin Quinville, deputy chief of mission at the embassy, is expected to replace Grenell on an interim basis, the report said. The news comes only days after the U.S. Senate confirmed Representative John Ratcliffe, like Grenell a staunch political ally of President Donald Trump, as the permanent director of national intelligence (DNI).

  • Taiwan offers people of Hong Kong 'necessary assistance' after protests over new security laws
    The Telegraph

    Taiwan offers people of Hong Kong 'necessary assistance' after protests over new security laws

    Taiwan will provide the people of Hong Kong with "necessary assistance", President Tsai Ing-wen said, after thousands in the Chinese ruled territory protested against Beijing's plans to impose new national security laws. Taiwan has become a refuge for a small but growing number of pro-democracy protesters fleeing Hong Kong, which has been convulsed since last year by anti-Beijing and anti-Hong Kong government protests. Hong Kong police fired tear gas and water cannon to disperse thousands of people who rallied on Sunday to protest against Beijing's move to introduce new national security laws.

  • Russian prosecutors seek 18 years for ex-US marine in spy trial
    AFP

    Russian prosecutors seek 18 years for ex-US marine in spy trial

    Russian prosecutors on Monday called for a former US marine charged with spying to be sentenced to 18 years in prison, after a closed-door trial denounced by Washington and his family. Paul Whelan, 50, was detained in Moscow in December 2018 for allegedly receiving state secrets, but he insists he was framed when he took a USB drive from an acquaintance thinking it contained holiday photos. His trial, which caused tensions between Moscow and Washington and sparked speculation of a prisoner swap, concluded with closing arguments on Monday.

  • Charlamagne Tha God Reacts to Joe Biden’s ‘You Ain’t Black’ Apology
    The Daily Beast

    Charlamagne Tha God Reacts to Joe Biden’s ‘You Ain’t Black’ Apology

    MSNBC's Joy Reid opened her interview with Charlamagne Tha God on Sunday morning by congratulating him on his interview this past week with former Vice President Joe Biden—even if all anyone wants to talk about are the final few seconds. “You've got more questions?” Biden asked. Shortly after that interview, Biden apologized for his remarks on a conference call with the Black Chamber of Commerce.

  • Kim Jong Un makes first public appearance in weeks
    CBS News

    Kim Jong Un makes first public appearance in weeks

    North Korean state-run media KCNA reported Sunday that Kim Jong Un attended a meeting of military leaders. Kim presided over the Workers' Party of Korea Central Military Commission, discussing "new policies for further increasing the nuclear war deterrence of the country," state-run KCNA media reported. It's his first public appearance since May 1, when state-run media reported he attended at a factory opening after rumors flew that he was gravely ill.

  • Corona rage is boiling over. To ease tensions, masks should be mandatory
    The Guardian

    Corona rage is boiling over. To ease tensions, masks should be mandatory

    The jerks and trolls will always be with us, but if everyone else is wearing a mask at least they'll be easier to spot I know that making a nationwide order to wear masks in public is not going to prevent all Waffle House shootings – no law yet created has been able to stop such an inevitability. But during times of uncertainty, we look to our leaders to tell us what we should do. And where are all of our agents of authority?

  • Baby gorilla injured at Seattle Zoo
    Yahoo News Video

    Baby gorilla injured at Seattle Zoo

    A baby gorilla was badly injured at a Seattle zoo on Saturday when he was caught in a skirmish between his family group members, zookeepers said.

  • Russia records its highest daily death toll from the coronavirus as its number of new cases appears to decline
    Business Insider

    Russia records its highest daily death toll from the coronavirus as its number of new cases appears to decline

    Lev Fedoseyev\TASS via Getty Images Russia recorded 8,599 new cases 153 new deaths on Sunday linked to the coronavirus, raising its overall death toll to 3,541. The country has recorded 344,481 coronavirus cases and is the third-worst hit country in its total number of coronavirus cases behind Brazil and the US, according to data from Johns Hopkins University. While its daily death toll continues to increase, its number of new daily cases appears to be on the decline.

  • Oklahoma woman missing since April following Facebook post that indicated she believed she had coronavirus
    NBC News

    Oklahoma woman missing since April following Facebook post that indicated she believed she had coronavirus

    Nearly two months have passed since 53-year-old Talina Galloway vanished from her home in Wagoner, Oklahoma, leaving behind her purse and vehicle. “We're really worried about her,” Talina's niece, Chantel Jones, told Dateline. Chantel told Dateline she spent most of her summers living with her Aunt Talina in Indiana.

  • China says opposes all U.S. restrictions on Chinese airlines
    Reuters

    China says opposes all U.S. restrictions on Chinese airlines

    China said on Monday it opposes all U.S. restrictions imposed against Chinese airlines, responding to a report that the U.S. Transportation Department has demanded Chinese carriers file their schedules and other flight details by May 27. Chinese foreign ministry spokesman Zhao Lijian said flight restrictions imposed by Beijing treated all airlines equally and were due to efforts to curb COVID-19 related risks. The U.S. government late on Friday accused the Chinese government of making it impossible for U.S. airlines to resume service to China.

  • Letters to the Editor: Why is the Trump administration working so hard to deport immigrant children?
    Los Angeles Times Opinion

    Letters to the Editor: Why is the Trump administration working so hard to deport immigrant children?

    To the editor: The appalling actions taken by the Trump administration against immigrant children is incomprehensible and is the clearest reflection of its moral decay. Trump and his allies have claimed again and again that they welcome immigrants who enter the country legally, yet while lawyers and sponsors struggle to follow the rules, our government moves these children from place to place without warning, will not disclose their whereabouts, and fast-tracks deportations to places so dangerous that they were willing to walk thousands of miles to escape them. To the editor: Compassion is yet another presidential quality that is missing in our current president.

  • Singapore warns of worst economic contraction since independence
    AFP

    Singapore warns of worst economic contraction since independence

    Singapore's embattled economy could shrink by as much as seven percent this year, which would be the worst reading since independence, with the government saying Tuesday the coronavirus pandemic had throttled the key export sector. The city-state is seen as a bellwether of the global economy and the historic contraction highlights the extreme pain being wrought on countries by the killer disease. The warning also came hours before Singapore's deputy prime minister is expected to unveil another stimulus package for the troubled city, which has been crippled by months of lockdowns around the world.

  • Shunned by his party, Iowa's Steve King fights for his seat
    Associated Press

    Shunned by his party, Iowa's Steve King fights for his seat

    Rep. Steve King is fighting for his political life — but not because he's compared immigrants crossing the border illegally to cattle. Instead, the nine-term congressman known for his nativist politics is fighting to prove he can still deliver for Iowa's 4th Congressional District. Since Republican leaders stripped him of his committee assignments, in a rare punishment, King has been dogged by questions over whether he's lost all effectiveness.

  • Italy to recruit army of 60,000 volunteers to enforce social distancing rules
    The Telegraph

    Italy to recruit army of 60,000 volunteers to enforce social distancing rules

    Italy wants to recruit an army of 60,000 volunteers to help enforce social distancing rules, amid fears that a second wave of infections could be looming. The volunteers would not have any policing powers but would patrol piazzas, parks, playgrounds, markets, bar areas and beaches, asking people not to congregate in large groups. They would be drawn from the ranks of the unemployed, those on income support and those who have been furloughed as a result of the economic crisis caused by the pandemic.

  • Joe Biden forced to make his fundraisers fully virtual – bar the price tag
    The Guardian

    Joe Biden forced to make his fundraisers fully virtual – bar the price tag

    The coronavirus pandemic may have driven Joe Biden into his basement and forced his campaign online, but one crucial factor is still the same: his run for the White House still needs to raise giant amounts of money. A fundraising invite for a 14 May event for the New Hampshire Republican congressional candidate Matt Mowers featuring the former New Jersey governor Chris Christie starts at $250 for the “individual” level and goes all the way to $1,000 for the chair level.

  • North Dakota Governor Chokes Up as He Calls on State Residents to Avoid 'Mask Shaming'
    Time

    North Dakota Governor Chokes Up as He Calls on State Residents to Avoid 'Mask Shaming'

    The governor of North Dakota seemed on the verge of tears Friday, as he urged residents to be “empathetic” towards those who decide to wear face masks, noting that some people are far greater risk from COVID-19. Speaking at a press conference in the state's capital, Gov. Doug Burgum, a Republican, choked up as he asked residents to “dial up your empathy and your understanding” when they see someone wearing a face mask. “If someone is wearing a mask, they're not doing it to represent what political party they're in or what candidates they support,” said Burgum.

  • Oxford scientists working on a coronavirus vaccine say there is now only a 50% chance of success because the number of UK cases is falling too quickly
    Business Insider

    Oxford scientists working on a coronavirus vaccine say there is now only a 50% chance of success because the number of UK cases is falling too quickly

    YouTube/University of Oxford Oxford scientists working on a coronavirus vaccine say the chances of success are now 50%. They say that's because the number of people with the virus in the UK is falling too quickly. "At the moment, there's a 50% chance that we get no result at all," scientist Adam Hill said this weekend.

  • Coronavirus outbreak: Caribbean tourism struggles as visitors stay home
    BBC

    Coronavirus outbreak: Caribbean tourism struggles as visitors stay home

    Seagulls are the only ones using the pool at a resort fringing one of Antigua's most popular beaches. The absence of holidaymakers due to the Covid-19 pandemic is keenly felt on this Caribbean island for which, like many of its counterparts, tourism has long been its breadbasket. Often dubbed the "most tourism-dependent region in the world", the Caribbean attracted more than 31 million visitors last year.

  • Hong Kong's leader says security laws will not affect city's rights and freedoms
    Reuters

    Hong Kong's leader says security laws will not affect city's rights and freedoms

    Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam said on Tuesday that Beijing's proposed national security laws would not trample on the city's rights and freedoms and called on citizens to wait to see the details of the legislation. Lam added her voice to an unprecedented barrage of statements by Beijing and local officials, and former city leaders defending the legislation and seeking to reassure residents, investors and diplomats about Hong Kong freedoms. "There is no need for us to worry," Lam told a regular weekly news conference.

  • Trumpsters Are Already Revolting Against COVID Contact Tracing
    The Daily Beast

    Trumpsters Are Already Revolting Against COVID Contact Tracing

    Donald Trump's allies in conservative media have a new villain in the coronavirus fight: contact tracing, the rigorous efforts to track the virus's spread that public health experts say is essential to safely restarting society. Fox News host Laura Ingraham devoted much of her show Thursday night to raising questions about contact tracing, the process where interviewers try to figure out who has been exposed to the virus by literally figuring out whom the infected had contact with. As a Fox News chyron warned that contact tracing should “concern all Americans,” Ingraham claimed that calls for more contact tracers were just an “excuse” to keep businesses closed, and compared being interviewed by a contact tracer to being groped by a Transportation Security Administration agent.

  • Corruption convictions nearly double in China over last year
    AFP

    Corruption convictions nearly double in China over last year

    The number of convictions related to corruption in China nearly doubled last year, according to a report by Beijing's top prosecutor, as President Xi Jinping ramped up his crackdown on graft. According to the annual report from the Supreme People's Procuratorate submitted to the national parliament, 18,585 people were prosecuted for crimes related to corruption in 2019, a 90 percent year-on-year increase. Sixteen cases involved former provincial or ministerial-level Communist Party cadres, including former Yunnan party chief Qin Guangrong, who was accused of taking bribes.

  • Judge rules against Florida Republican-backed law blocking felons from voting until they pay legal fees
    The Independent

    Judge rules against Florida Republican-backed law blocking felons from voting until they pay legal fees

    A federal judge in Tallahassee ruled on Sunday night that Florida law can't stop felons from voting because they can't pay back any legal fees and restitution they owe. The judge's decision could have deep ramifications as the state's estimated 774,000 disenfranchised felons represent a significant voting bloc. Florida is well known for razor-thin election margins, and many of those felons are people of colour and presumed to be Democrats, which could have a major impact on the 2020 election.

  • Spike in businesses filing for bankruptcy
    NBC News

    Spike in businesses filing for bankruptcy

    When the history of the COVID-19 pandemic is written, there will be more than a few words devoted to the retailers the virus decimated as it pounded the economy. The last month, in particular, has brought bankruptcies from well-known brands with deep roots around the country. In the space of just two weeks, some of the best-known brands in America declared they were entering Chapter 11 bankruptcy and closing outlets across the country.

  • Warren reportedly turning back to wealthy donors in effort to boost Biden
    The Week

    Warren reportedly turning back to wealthy donors in effort to boost Biden

    Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) is reportedly reaching back into her old toolbox in an attempt to help former Vice President Joe Biden. Warren has agreed to host a gathering of big money donors for the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee, The New York Times reports. During Warren's own presidential campaign, which ended shortly after Super Tuesday in March, the progressive Democratic senator vowed not to attend private events or call wealthy potential donors for contributions.

  • Alabama's Easing of Restrictions Has Given  'A False Sense of Security,' Says Montgomery Mayor Steven Reed
    Time

    Alabama's Easing of Restrictions Has Given 'A False Sense of Security,' Says Montgomery Mayor Steven Reed

    Cases of coronavirus are on the rise in Alabama, where Gov. Kay Ivey has allowed summer camps, movie theaters, casinos and more to reopen as part of recently expanded “Safer at Home” orders. Speaking on CNN, Reed said the spike in cases was due in part to people deciding on their own that the COVID-19 pandemic is over, and called the easing of restrictions a “mistake.” “They are ready to get back to their normal way of doing things, and that's a mistake that we've been making over the last few weeks, is we have kind of eased restrictions in this community and across the state,” he said.