Tulsi Gabbard Suggests Obama Devised Biden’s ‘Ministry of Truth’ Disinformation Board

Former Hawaii congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard implied that former President Barack Obama devised the formation of President Biden’s recently announced Disinformation Governance Board, which critics have likened to the “Ministry of Truth” from George Orwell’s 1984.

“Biden is just a front man,” Gabbard tweeted Sunday. “Obama, April 21: social media censors ‘don’t go far enough,’ so the government needs to step in to do the job. Six days later, Homeland Security rolls out the ‘Ministry of Truth’ (aka Disinformation Governance Board).”

Gabbard’s tweet was in reference to Obama’s speech at Stanford University last week, where he declared that tech companies have an obligation to more strictly police disinformation and called for the government to facilitate that.

“Now the good news is that almost all the big tech platforms now acknowledge some responsibility for content on their platforms, and they’re investing in large team of people to monitor it,” Obama said during the speech. “Given the sheer volume of content, this strategy can feel like a game of Whack-A-Mole.”

He praised some social-media firms for independently restricting such content on their forums but stated that government is needed to enforce stricter standards.

“But while content moderation can limit the distribution of clearly dangerous content, it doesn’t go far enough,” he added.

Last week, the Biden administration launched a Disinformation Governance Board under the Department of Homeland Security to counter Internet disinformation. Its creation came on the heels of the recent acquisition of Twitter by tech titan Elon Musk, who promised to promote free speech, presumably through less content moderation and censorship on the platform.

“The goal is to bring the resources of (DHS) together to address this threat,” with an emphasis on combatting disinformation before the 2022 midterms, Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas said before the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Homeland Security Wednesday.

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