Twitter testing new feature for sending money to accounts

·2 min read

Twitter announced Thursday that it's testing a new "Tip Jar" feature that allows users to send their favorite accounts money. Only a select few accounts are currently able to receive money, but all Twitter users using the app in English can now send funds to those creators.

"We $ee you – sharing your PayPal link after your Tweet goes viral, adding your $Cashtag to your profile so people can support your work, dropping your Venmo handle on your birthday or if you just need some extra help," Twitter said in a blog post. "You drive the conversation on Twitter and we want to make it easier for you to support each other beyond Follows, Retweets, and Likes."

show your love, leave a tip now testing Tip Jar, a new way to give and receive money on Twitter 💸 more coming soon... pic.twitter.com/7vyCzlRIFc

— Twitter (@Twitter) May 6, 2021

The new "Tip Jar" aims to streamline how people send money on the site. Many people use the app to fundraise or collect payment from their followers, but are forced to include their payment links after viral tweets or constantly re-up their request. 

Currently, only a limited group — including "creators, journalists, experts and nonprofits" — can enable their tip jars and receive funds. The company said it plans to expand the feature to more users in the upcoming months. 

The new feature is accessible through a user's profile page. To send funds, simply click on the "Tip Jar" icon and select which payment option you want to use. Bandcamp, Cash App, Patreon, PayPal and Venmo are available for iPhone users, and Android users can also send money through the Spaces feature. Twitter said it does not take a cut of the money. 

"Tip Jar is an easy way to support the incredible voices that make up the conversation on Twitter," the company said. "This is a first step in our work to create new ways for people to receive and show support on Twitter – with money."

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