U.S. ENERGY SECRETARY RICK PERRY IS EXPECTED TO ANNOUNCE HIS RESIGNATION NEXT MONTH -POLITICO

U.S. ENERGY SECRETARY RICK PERRY IS EXPECTED TO ANNOUNCE HIS RESIGNATION NEXT MONTH -POLITICO

  • White House: Trump 'strongly condemns' parody video of him shooting critics and media outlets in church
    Yahoo News

    White House: Trump 'strongly condemns' parody video of him shooting critics and media outlets in church

    The White House on Monday tried to distance itself from a violent parody video that shows President Trump shooting and stabbing critics and members of the media in a church. “But based upon everything he has heard, he strongly condemns this video,” Grisham tweeted. According to the New York Times, the crude video was shown at a pro-Trump conference at the president's Doral Miami resort over the weekend, where Donald Trump Jr. and former White House press secretary Sarah Sanders were among the guest speakers.

  • Nigerian police rescue 67 from 'inhuman' conditions at Islamic 'school'
    Reuters

    Nigerian police rescue 67 from 'inhuman' conditions at Islamic 'school'

    Police in northern Nigeria rescued nearly 70 men and boys from a second purported Islamic school where they were shackled and subjected to "inhuman and degrading treatments." The raid in Katsina, the northwestern home state of President Muhammadu Buhari, came less than a month after about 300 men and boys were freed from another supposed Islamic school in neighboring Kaduna state where they were allegedly tortured and sexually abused. "In the course of investigation, sixty-seven persons from the ages of 7 to 40 years were found shackled with chains," Katsina police spokesman Sanusi Buba said in a statement.

  • Flooded bullet trains show Japan's risks from disasters
    Associated Press

    Flooded bullet trains show Japan's risks from disasters

    Experts say they also instill a false sense of security in a country inured to danger by the constant threat of calamitous earthquakes, tsunami and volcanos. "Weather conditions in Japan up to now have been relatively moderate," said Toshitaka Katada, a disaster expert and professor at the University of Tokyo. Those days are over, and Japan's readiness for disasters, still based on data collected decades ago, hasn't kept up with the times, he said.

  • In Jamal Khashoggi's death, Saudi money is talking louder than murder
    USA TODAY Opinion

    In Jamal Khashoggi's death, Saudi money is talking louder than murder

    Anyone interested in what it looks like to get away with murder should peruse the attendee list for Saudi Arabia's flashy "Davos in the Desert" this month. Vaporizing into the desert heat is all the righteous alarm that compelled leading financial firms to boycott the event last year out of concern that Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, weeks before, had ordered the grisly killing of Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi. Attending this year's extravaganza are executives of JPMorgan Chase, Goldman Sachs and Citigroup, all of them institutions selected to underwrite the kingdom's highly anticipated, partial public offering of its oil company, Aramco, valued $1.5 trillion to $2 trillion.

  • Disney Skyliner reopens with modified hours after stranding passengers last week
    USA TODAY

    Disney Skyliner reopens with modified hours after stranding passengers last week

    Disney's Skyliner is up and running again with modified service after the new aerial cable car system stranded passengers for hours the night of Oct. 5. "Beginning today, guests may travel aboard Disney Skyliner from 8 a.m. to 10:30 p.m.," reads an update on Walt Disney World Resort's Skyliner landing page. "Following a complete review with the manufacturer, we've made adjustments to our processes and training, and we are improving how we communicate with guests during their flight with Disney Skyliner," Thomas Smith, editorial content director at Disney Parks, wrote in a blog post on Monday.

  • Climate change researchers recommend banning all frequent flyer reward programs to cut carbon emissions by targeting jet-setters
    Business Insider

    Climate change researchers recommend banning all frequent flyer reward programs to cut carbon emissions by targeting jet-setters

    A new report commissioned by the Committee on Climate Change, the UK government's official climate-change advisers, has called for a ban on all frequent flyer reward programs to discourage people from traveling by air so much. Researchers from Imperial College London, who wrote the report, said that just 15% of the entire British population take 70% of all flights from the country. The report also called for an "air miles levy" to punish people who fly long distances, which would target those who rack up the most air miles, rather than people who travel shorter distances.

  • Anthony Scaramucci is desperately trying to recruit Mitt Romney for a 2020 run
    The Week

    Anthony Scaramucci is desperately trying to recruit Mitt Romney for a 2020 run

    Sen. Mitt Romney (R-Utah) is running for president again — at least in Anthony Scaramucci's dreams. The famously short-lived White House communications director has since turned on the president who appointed him, and has publicly said he's trying to knock President Trump off the 2020 ticket. Now, it seems Scaramucci has decided on his dream candidate, and has launched a website and line of T-shirts to persuade him to run.

  • View Photos of Our Sports Sedan Battle Between the Dodge Charger and Kia Stinger GT
    Car and Driver

    View Photos of Our Sports Sedan Battle Between the Dodge Charger and Kia Stinger GT

    America's leading (and only) V-8 muscle sedan takes on Korea's upstart rear-drive hatchback in a battle of power versus poise. From Car and Driver

  • Soldier wounded during search for Bowe Bergdahl dies of his injuries
    The Telegraph

    Soldier wounded during search for Bowe Bergdahl dies of his injuries

    A US soldier shot in the head during the 2009 search for army deserter Bowe Bergdahl has died from his injuries. Army Master Sgt. Mark Allen died on Saturday at the age of 46, 10 years after being injured in the hunt for his missing comrade. He spent 21 years in the army and national guard, and retired in 2013 on receiving the Purple Heart.

  • The U.S. Spoiled a Deal That Might Have Saved the Kurds, Former Top Official Says
    The Daily Beast

    The U.S. Spoiled a Deal That Might Have Saved the Kurds, Former Top Official Says

    ABU DHABI—Abandoned by the Americans, their former allies, Syria's Kurds reportedly are allowing troops from the Assad regime to enter territory they had under their control. The Kurds also are putting out feelers to Russia for support against an onslaught by Turkish troops and Turkish-supported militias. A return of Bashar al-Assad's forces to northeastern Syria for the first time in seven years would make visible the end to the bitter, controversial U.S. mission there against the so-called Islamic State.

  • Reuters

    UPDATE 1-Kremlin envoy calls Turkish military operation in Syria 'unacceptable'

    The Kremlin's envoy for Syria on Tuesday called Turkey's military offensive in northeast Syria "unacceptable" and denied Ankara's operation had been cleared by Moscow in advance, Russian news agencies reported. Alexander Lavrentiev, Russian President Vladimir Putin's envoy for Syria, was speaking to reporters in Abu Dhabi during an official visit there by Putin. He made his comments after Turkey ignored new sanctions from the United States to press on with its assault on northern Syria while the Russia-backed Syrian army entered one of the most hotly contested cities, filling a void created by Donald Trump's abrupt retreat.

  • Hong Kong's leader: Territory not becoming a police state
    Associated Press

    Hong Kong's leader: Territory not becoming a police state

    Hong Kong's leader said Tuesday that "it's totally irresponsible and unfounded" to suggest the semi-autonomous Chinese territory is becoming a police state as her government grapples with protests now in their fifth month. In a spirited defense of Hong Kong's 30,000-strong police force and her handling of the protests in response to criticism from visiting U.S. senators, Carrie Lam challenged the notion that the territory is losing its freedoms, unique in China, as police battle demonstrators in the streets. "I would challenge every politician to ask themselves if the large extent of violent acts, and all those petrol bombs and arson and deadly attacks on policemen, happened in their own country, what would they do?

  • India blocks SMS services in Kashmir after trucker killed
    AFP

    India blocks SMS services in Kashmir after trucker killed

    Text messaging services were blocked in Indian Kashmir just hours after being restored when a truck driver was killed by suspected militants and his vehicle set ablaze, authorities said Tuesday. Separately Indian officials said that a 24-year-old woman died in the latest exchange of artillery fire with Pakistan over their de-facto border dividing the blood-soaked Himalayan region. Security sources said the decision to cut text messaging services was taken to reduce the ability of militants to communicate.

  • When police misconduct occurs, records often stay secret. One mom's fight to change that.
    USA TODAY

    When police misconduct occurs, records often stay secret. One mom's fight to change that.

    Furious about the way she was treated, she worked with other families whose relatives were killed by police to help push for the recent passage of California's new Senate Bill 1421, which as of January 1 overrides decades of precedent and requires police departments to open internal investigation records related to deadly force and police wrongdoing. The law could inspire reform at police departments across the nation at a time when the relationship between police and the public is fraught with tension following numerous fatal shootings, particularly involving victims of color.

  • The National Interest

    With Hypersonic Missiles, Israel's F-35s Are Upping The Ante In Syria

    Key point: The Middle East's skies belong to Israel. Israel will soon have a new precision-guided supersonic stand-off missile for its F-35s and other fighter jets. The new missile was announced on June 11, 2018 in a press release by two leading Israeli defense firms, Israeli Military Industries Systems (IMI Systems) and Israel Aerospace Industries, which jointly developed the missile.

  • Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez faces backlash over haircut
    Yahoo News Video

    Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez faces backlash over haircut

    This week, the Washington Times published a story saying that Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y. had spent $80 on a haircut and $180 on color at a Washington, D.C., salon, a choice the newspaper presented as hypocritical, given she “regularly rails against the rich and complains about the cost of living inside the Beltway.

  • Cyber-bullied K-pop star found dead at her home
    AFP Relax News

    Cyber-bullied K-pop star found dead at her home

    A popular K-pop star who had long been the target of abusive online comments was found dead at her home Monday, South Korean police said. The body of Sulli, a former member of top girl group f(x), was discovered by her manager at her home on the outskirts of the capital, Seoul. South Korea has one of the world's highest rates of suicide which, according to recent government figures, is among the top causes of death for those under 40.

  • Pope's bodyguard resigns over new financial leaks scandal
    Associated Press

    Pope's bodyguard resigns over new financial leaks scandal

    The Vatican's latest scandal claimed its first victim Monday as Pope Francis' chief bodyguard resigned over the leak of a Vatican police flyer identifying five employees who were suspended as part of a financial investigation. The Vatican said its police chief, Domenico Giani, bore no responsibility for the leaked flyer but resigned to avoid disrupting the investigation and "out of love for the church and faithfulness" to the pope. Giani, a 20-year veteran of the Vatican's security services, has stood by Francis' side and jogged alongside his popemobile during hundreds of public appearances and foreign trips.

  • The impeachment inquiry into Trump, explained in 60 seconds
    Business Insider

    The impeachment inquiry into Trump, explained in 60 seconds

    The complaint detailed concerns how Trump used the call with Zelensky to pressure the Ukrainian government to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden and his son days after withholding a nearly $400 million military-aid package. Biden's son, Hunter, served on the board of Ukrainian oil and gas company Burisma Holdings from 2014 to 2019. Trump and his allies have falsely accused Biden of using his power as vice president to urge Ukraine to fire a prosecutor who was investigating Burisma in order to protect Hunter.

  • Reuters

    Putin aide: Turkish operation 'not exactly' compatible with Syria's territorial integrity

    Kremlin aide Yuri Ushakov said on Monday that Turkey's military incursion into northern Syria was "not exactly" compatible with Syria's territorial integrity. Ushakov, speaking in Riyadh during an official visit to Saudi Arabia by President Vladimir Putin, was commenting on Turkey's military operation which it launched last week. Asked by reporters if what was happening was consistent with Syria's territorial integrity, something that Russia has repeatedly said it wants respected, Ushakov said: "Not exactly."

  • The Independent

    Son of sheriff who called immigrants ‘drunks’ at White House event arrested for public intoxication

    The son of a Texas sheriff who used a White House press conference to describe immigrant offenders as “drunks” likely to repeatedly break the law has been arrested for public intoxication. Sergei Waybourn, 24, faces a count of indecent exposure as well as public drunkenness just days after his father, Tarrant County Sheriff Bill Waybourn, was criticised for the comments. Responding to a California court ruling that banned immigration officers from arresting people on the basis of records that have been proven unreliable, Sheriff Waybourn said 7% of his 4,200 inmates were “illegal aliens”.

  • Harry Dunn: Parents reject apology from Anne Sacoolas as they fly to the United States
    The Telegraph

    Harry Dunn: Parents reject apology from Anne Sacoolas as they fly to the United States

    Mrs Sacoolas, who claimed diplomatic immunity and left Britain following the accident, has now written a letter expressing her "deepest sympathies and apologies" and offering to meet Harry's parents. But Ms Charles said: "My opinion on Anne Sacoolas now wanting to come forward and say sorry - to be perfectly honest, yes it's the start of some closure for our family. "Having said that, as it's nearly seven weeks now since we lost our boy, sorry just doesn't cut it.

  • We found 85,000 cops who’ve been investigated for misconduct. Now you can read their records.
    USA TODAY

    We found 85,000 cops who’ve been investigated for misconduct. Now you can read their records.

    At least 85,000 law enforcement officers across the USA have been investigated or disciplined for misconduct over the past decade, an investigation by USA TODAY Network found. Despite their role as public servants, the men and women who swear an oath to keep communities safe can generally avoid public scrutiny for their misdeeds. The records of their misconduct are filed away, rarely seen by anyone outside their departments.

  • China inflation surges as pork prices soar
    AFP

    China inflation surges as pork prices soar

    China's consumer inflation accelerated at its fastest pace in almost six years in September as African swine fever sent pork prices soaring nearly 70 percent, official data showed Tuesday. Authorities have gone as far as tapping the nation's pork reserve to control prices of the staple meat, as the swine fever crisis could become a political and economic liability for the state. The consumer price index (CPI) -- a key gauge of retail inflation -- hit 3.0 percent last month, the National Bureau of Statistics (NBS) said, up from 2.8 percent in August and the highest since since November 2013.

  • Court Ruling Extends Vote Protest of Philippine Marcos’ Son
    Bloomberg

    Court Ruling Extends Vote Protest of Philippine Marcos’ Son

    The Philippines' top court on Tuesday decided to release the initial results of the vice-presidential vote recount, which the late dictator Ferdinand Marcos' son said will delay his chance to assume the post. Former Senator Ferdinand Marcos Jr. said he is “frustrated” by the court's decision not to resolve his election protest against Vice President Leni Robredo victory in the 2016 polls. Robredo is already halfway through her six-year term.