U.S. gives extension to sale order of TikTok

The U.S. has given TikTok's parent company, ByteDance, another extension on a deadline to sell its U.S. business.

The short video sharing app is loved by millions of Americans, but the Trump adminstration claims it poses a national security threat from China.

President Donald Trump signed an executive order in August, giving ByteDance 90 days to sell TikTok to American buyers.

That deadline was due to expire in November, and this latest extension to December 4 is the second one that's been granted.

U.S. authorities said on Wednesday they were reviewing a revised submission from ByteDance to divest TikTok.

If that proposed deal is rejected, TikTok could effectively be banned by the U.S.

ByteDance is, however, pursuing litigation seeking to halt such a ban.

In its legal filings, TikTok has argued that Trump relied on anti-Chinese rhetoric during his unssuccessful re-election campaign.

Three American TikTok users, in turn, have argued that a shutdown would infringe their First Amendment rights, leading a district judge in Philadelphia to issue an injunction temporarily blocking the ban.

The Department of Justice has appealed the ruling.

If it all drags into next year, the issue will lie in president-elect Joe Biden's inbox, who may decide to abandon the forced sale of TikTok altogether.

Video Transcript

- The US has given TikTok's parent company, ByteDance, another extension on a deadline to sell its US business. The short-video-sharing app is loved by millions of Americans, but the Trump administration claims it poses a national security threat from China.

President Donald Trump signed an executive order in August giving ByteDance 90 days to sell TikTok to American buyers. That deadline was due to expire in November, and this latest extension to December the 4th is the second one that's been granted.

US authorities said on Wednesday they were reviewing a revised submission for ByteDance to divest TikTok. If that proposed deal is rejected, TikTok could effectively be banned by the US. ByteDance is, however, pursuing litigation seeking to halt such a ban.

In its legal filings, TikTok has argued that Trump relied on anti-Chinese rhetoric during his unsuccessful re-election campaign. Three American users, in turn, have argued that a shutdown would infringe their First Amendment rights, leading a district judge in Philadelphia to issue an injunction temporarily blocking the ban. The Department of Justice has appealed that ruling.

If it all drags into next year, the issue will lie in President-elect Joe Biden's inbox, who may decide to abandon the forced sale of TikTok altogether.