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U.S. graduates urged to 'wear the cap, donate the gown'

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Empty stadiums and virtual ceremonies will be the norm for graduation this year.

But frontline doctor's assistant Nathaniel Moore doesn't want graduates to let their hard-earned regalia go to waste.

He's urging graduates to "wear the cap and donate the gown."

Moore founded a charity called Gowns 4 Good, which gives the graduation gear to medical workers in need of personal protective equipment, or PPE.

More than 75,000 frontline responders have registered for gowns so far.

"The gowns are more effective than other alternative measures of PPE, given their length, their sleeves and their easy donning with zippered access."

Medical workers across the United States have taken to the streets protesting the lack of adequate protective gear.

Some doctors have even resorted to wearing trash bags, which Moore says does not offer protection for the arms or below the waist.

"To hear these personal stories of people on the frontlines that have nothing, that are begging for gowns, that are begging for any support that we can offer them and as fast as possible, and we're working just as hard as we can to make sure we can spread our story, get people to donate to help those that are reaching out."

Moore, who was also set to graduate this year from the MBA program at the University of Vermont, said Gowns 4 Good was the perfect way to honor both his healthcare colleagues and his fellow graduates.

"We're getting notes from individual donors and they're as heartfelt as can be. We have parents that are talking about children that have passed and they're holding onto their graduation gowns. And this is the best way that they see fit. They're honoring their sons and daughters lives by donating to this, just, wonderful cause."

Nearly 4 million people are expected to graduate from U.S. universities this year.

Video Transcript

- Empty stadiums and virtual ceremonies will be the norm for graduation this year. But frontline doctor's assistant Nathaniel Moore doesn't want graduates to let their hard-earned regalia go to waste. He's urging graduates to wear the cap and donate the gowns.

Moore founded a charity called Gowns for Good, which gives the graduation gear to medical workers in need of personal protective equipment or PPE. More than 75,000 frontline responders have registered for gowns so far.

NATHANIEL MOORE: The gowns are more effective than other alternative measures of PPE, given their length, their sleeves, and their easy donning with zippered access.

- Medical workers across the United States have taken to the streets protesting the lack of adequate protective gear. Some doctors have even resorted to wearing trash bags, which Moore says does not offer protection for the arms or below the waist.

NATHANIEL MOORE: To hear these personal stories of people on the frontlines that have nothing, that are begging for gowns, that are begging for any support that we can offer them and as fast as possible, and we're working just as hard as we can to make sure we can spread our story, get people to donate to help those that are reaching out.

- Moore, who is also set to graduate this year from the MBA program at the University of Vermont, said Gowns for Good was the perfect way to honor both his healthcare colleagues and his fellow graduates.

NATHANIEL MOORE: We're getting notes from individual donors, and they're as heartfelt as can be. We have parents that are talking about children that have passed, and they're holding onto their graduation gowns, and this is the best way that they see fit. They're honoring their son or daughter's lives by donating to this just wonderful cause.

- Nearly four million people are expected to graduate from US universities this year.