The U.S. Marine Corps Has Lost More Than 25,000 Marines to Misconduct

Task and Purpose

Task and Purpose

Security,

Why? 

The U.S. Marine Corps Has Lost More Than 25,000 Marines to Misconduct

The Marine Corps has lost more than 25,000 Marines to misconduct over the past decade, according to Commandant Gen. David Berger.

In his 2019 Commandant's Planning Guidance, Berger said that the Corps "continued loss of 8,000 Marines per year to non-EAS attrition is unacceptable," using an acronym to describe the end of active service in an enlistment.

A total of 25,336 Marines were booted from the Corps between 2009 and 2019; 11,765 were for drug and alcohol offenses, while 13,571 were over unspecified misconduct.

"This must change," Berger wrote, noting that the cost to replace that many Marines was in excess of $1 billion.

Interestingly, that number should be even higher, as its section on drug use reveals. Since Oct. 2017, 2,410 Marines tested positive for illegal drug use, but only 1,175, or 48.8%, had been separated. "I am deeply troubled by the continued retention of Marines failing to adhere to our standards related to drug use."

"We are an elite institution of warriors, and will remain so on my watch," Berger wrote. "It is our shared responsibility to ensure the continued health of our collective soul and identity."

Toward the end of the 26-page document, which largely focused on changes Berger intended to implement as the top Marine officer, the new commandant talked about misconduct in the force and what he called "destructive" behavior.

Of sexual assault, for example, Berger said that despite the Corps' efforts, "the continued rise in reporting leads me to conclude that we still do not fully understand the scope and scale of this issue, or that we can say with any confident that the measures we have taken to date are preventing sexual assaults."

Read the full article.

  • Pelosi describes Trump's 'very serious meltdown' during White House meeting on Syria
    Yahoo News

    Pelosi describes Trump's 'very serious meltdown' during White House meeting on Syria

    House Speaker Nancy Pelosi walked out of a meeting with Donald Trump about the crisis in Syria Wednesday after she said the president had had a “very serious meltdown” and insulted her in front of other congressional leaders. Now we have to pray for his health, because this was a very serious meltdown on the part of the president,” Pelosi told reporters on Capitol Hill. It was the first face-to-face meeting between Trump and Pelosi since House Democrats began their impeachment inquiry of the president in late September, and it came just hours after the House passed a resolution by a bipartisan vote of 354 to 60 rebuking the president for abandoning Kurdish militias that the U.S. had recruited to fight ISIS.

  • Ex-venture capital firm chief to plead guilty as another parent caves in college admissions scandal
    USA TODAY

    Ex-venture capital firm chief to plead guilty as another parent caves in college admissions scandal

    The move could signal a major shift in the historic admissions case that additional parents still fighting charges might also flip instead of going to trial next year. Henriquez, founder and CEO of Hercules Capital, is scheduled to appear in court Monday to enter his plea, the U.S. Attorney's Office in Boston said. Henriquez and his wife Elizabeth Henriquez face mail and wire fraud and money laundering charges for allegedly paying bribes to the admissions scheme's mastermind, Rick Singer, to have someone on four separate occasions cheat on college instance exams for their two daughters to boost their scores.

  • APNewsBreak: Skeleton unearthed beneath California peak
    Associated Press

    APNewsBreak: Skeleton unearthed beneath California peak

    Hofer phoned from the summit to report the finding and went to the sheriff's department the next day after hiking out to speak with investigators. Sgt. Nate Derr, who coordinates the county's search and rescue team, said bodies found in the mountains are typically connected with someone they know who has gone missing. The opposite is rarer: finding the remains of someone who appears to not have gone missing or been reported as missing.

  • Israel envoy demands probe after effigy of Jewish tycoon left at Ukraine synagogue
    Reuters

    Israel envoy demands probe after effigy of Jewish tycoon left at Ukraine synagogue

    The Israeli ambassador to Ukraine asked police on Thursday to find and punish people who left a red paint-spattered effigy of tycoon Ihor Kolomoisky, who holds a Ukrainian Jewish community leadership post, on the steps of the main synagogue in Kiev. Kolomoisky, one of Ukraine's richest men, is in the public eye over his business ties to President Volodymyr Zelenskiy, who came to fame as the star of TV show on a channel Kolomoisky owns. The tycoon has been in a protracted legal battle with the authorities over control of Urkaine's biggest bank.

  • Warren Left $30 Trillion Short of Paying for Her Health Plan
    Bloomberg

    Warren Left $30 Trillion Short of Paying for Her Health Plan

    “Her taxes as they currently exist are not enough yet to cover fully replacing health insurance,” University of California, Berkeley economics professor Emmanuel Saez, who advised the Warren campaign when developing the wealth tax, told Bloomberg News on Wednesday. Warren -- who campaigns on the theme that she has a plan for everything -- is relying on the wealthy and big corporations to pay for her vision of restructuring American society, including funding student debt, free college, universal childcare, green energy and affordable housing plans.

  • Mexico flies 300 Indian migrants to New Delhi in mass deportation
    Yahoo News Video

    Mexico flies 300 Indian migrants to New Delhi in mass deportation

    Mexico has deported more than 300 Indian nationals to New Delhi, the National Migration Institute said late on Wednesday, in what it described as an unprecedented transatlantic deportation.

  • Mystery as plane carrying Russian arms smugglers crashes in Congo
    The Telegraph

    Mystery as plane carrying Russian arms smugglers crashes in Congo

    The Democratic Republic of Congo has one of the world's worst aviation safety records, so reports that an aircraft had tumbled into a remote forest last week caused few international ripples. Since then, however, a deepening mystery over the nature of the cargo and the identity of those on board has left the Congolese government facing awkward questions. The passengers were identified as the personal chauffeur of Felix Tshisekedi, Congo's president, and three of his bodyguards.

  • Track-Ready Dodge Challenger ACR Could Be on Its Way
    Car and Driver

    Track-Ready Dodge Challenger ACR Could Be on Its Way

    What Dodge should do is build an ACR model out of its Challenger, complete with lightweight parts, lots of aero, and big power. And if this Mopar Insiders report is to be believed, we might just get our wish. Citing unnamed sources, Mopar Insiders claims Dodge is planning a range-topping track-oriented Challenger to celebrate the nameplate's 50th anniversary, and it could wear the ACR badge.

  • Putin signals Russia's return to Africa with summit
    AFP

    Putin signals Russia's return to Africa with summit

    President Vladimir Putin hosts dozens of African leaders next week as Russia seeks to reassert its influence on the continent and beyond. The heads of some 35 African countries are expected for the first Africa-Russia Summit in the Black Sea resort of Sochi next Wednesday and Thursday. For Putin, the summit is a chance to revive Soviet-era relationships and build new alliances, bolstering Moscow's global clout in the face of confrontation with the West.

  • Captives in ISIS Detention Camps Fear Calm Before the Storm
    The Daily Beast

    Captives in ISIS Detention Camps Fear Calm Before the Storm

    The Daily Beast reached out to a number of those women and found a range of views about the Turkish offensive and what it could mean for ISIS detainees. Some professed optimism about the possibility of release in the event that Kurdish guards melted away or Turkish forces took a more permissive attitude toward security. Others, however, are worried about what could happen to them under a new regime just as they've grown accustomed to living under Kurdish forces.

  • Hundreds of police officers have been labeled liars. Some still help send people to prison.
    USA TODAY

    Hundreds of police officers have been labeled liars. Some still help send people to prison.

    Last year, the state's attorney's office started reviewing court cases involving at least 25 Baltimore police officers because of misconduct charges against them. Prosecutors recently began asking the courts to vacate nearly 800 convictions that involved testimony or investigations by these officers – and more could be coming as the office continues to gather information. More than 530 Baltimore police officers have been added to an internal notification system, and defense attorneys are contacted if those officers are considered by prosecutors as witnesses.

  • Hong Kong protesters don cartoon masks to defy face mask ban
    Associated Press

    Hong Kong protesters don cartoon masks to defy face mask ban

    Hong Kong pro-democracy protesters donned cartoon character masks as they formed human chains across the semiautonomous Chinese city on Friday night, in defiance of a government ban on face coverings at public assemblies. Chinese internet users have joked that Chinese President Xi Jinping resembles the talking bear, leading the country's censors to scrub online references to the character. The protesters were taking a lighthearted approach to oppose the government's decision this month to invoke colonial-era emergency regulations banning face masks at rallies as it struggles to contain the chaotic protest movement.

  • Elijah Cummings, U.S. civil rights icon who led House probe of Trump, dead at 68
    Reuters

    Elijah Cummings, U.S. civil rights icon who led House probe of Trump, dead at 68

    U.S. Representative Elijah Cummings, a civil rights champion who over the last quarter century became one of the most influential Democrats in Congress and a key figure in the impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump, died on Thursday. He was 68. A powerful speaker with a formidable presence, Cummings had clashed with Trump on subjects ranging from congressional oversight of the White House to Trump's attacks on Cummings' native city of Baltimore, which the president called "rat-infested."

  • Peek Inside Eero Saarinen’s Iconic General Motors Technical Center
    Architectural Digest

    Peek Inside Eero Saarinen’s Iconic General Motors Technical Center

    A new book dives into the rarely seen archives of the iconic midcentury-modern campus in Warren, Michigan Originally Appeared on Architectural Digest

  • Bloomberg

    Puerto Rico Senator Pushes Anticorruption Bill After Arrests

    Puerto Rico's senate majority leader has introduced a bill to combat corruption in the bankrupt U.S. commonwealth, whose officials have faced presidential criticism and federal prosecution as it rebuilds after 2017's devastating Hurricane Maria. The bill by Senator Carmelo J. Rios-Santiago of the ruling New Progressive Party, would require government contractors to use software that would track hours worked, screen time used and subject matter handled. This is a good step we can take as a government to show that we're doing our part to make sure money is well spent,” Rios-Santiago said in an interview.

  • Why Mexico Is Cooperating with Us on Immigration
    National Review

    Why Mexico Is Cooperating with Us on Immigration

    One of the reasons border apprehensions have dropped from their alarming peak in May is that Mexico has been pretty aggressive in stopping third-country nationals from traversing its territory on their way north to make bogus asylum claims so they can be released into the U.S. It's especially curious because in the past, Mexico was not at all eager to help us limit illegal immigration, a pattern we might have expected to intensify with last year's election as president of left-wing populist Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador (commonly known as AMLO, pronounced as a word rather than initials). No doubt President Trump's tariff threats had some effect.

  • Moms Demand Action founder says advocacy group is not anti-gun
    CBS News

    Moms Demand Action founder says advocacy group is not anti-gun

    Moms Demand Action is a grassroots organization advocating for stronger gun control measures, founded as a Facebook group the day after the that took the lives of 26 people, 20 of whom were young children. But while its members advocate for an assault ban, Moms Demand Action founder Shannon Watts says that it's a "misnomer" to call the group anti-gun. "Often people think that because we're doing this work, we're anti-gun or we don't support the Second Amendment.

  • Say Cheese! Satellite Photos Reveal China’s New Aircraft Carrier
    The National Interest

    Say Cheese! Satellite Photos Reveal China’s New Aircraft Carrier

    Reuters obtained the photos from the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, D.C. In the images, construction of the Type 002 carrier appears to be well underway at the shipyard near Shanghai. The Type 002 would be the Chinese fleet's first full-size carrier with catapults for launching heavy aircraft. Beijing's first flattop, the Type 001 Liaoning, is a refurbished ex-Soviet vessel with a ramp for launching planes instead of catapults.

  • Anti-Trump businesswomen are nervous about Warren, and the Democratic debate didn't help
    USA TODAY Opinion

    Anti-Trump businesswomen are nervous about Warren, and the Democratic debate didn't help

    But rising along with Warren is anxiety among corporate leaders, especially the growing number of women working in the corporate sector, who fear her strident anti-corporate rhetoric could actually cost Democrats the presidency if she is the nominee. Typical was this Warren response at Tuesday night's debate: “My question is not why do Bernie and I support a wealth tax. It's why is it does everyone else on this stage think it is more important to protect billionaires than it is to invest in an entire generation of Americans?

  • Taco Bell sued by NJ couple over $2.18 dispute over Chalupa Cravings Boxes
    USA TODAY

    Taco Bell sued by NJ couple over $2.18 dispute over Chalupa Cravings Boxes

    A dispute over $2.18 at Taco Bell literally has become a federal case. Nelson Estrella-Rojas and his wife, Joann Estrella, of Middlesex Borough, are suing Taco Bell and its parent company, Yum! Brands, which also owns KFC and Pizza Hut, because they were charged $12.18 for two Chalupa Cravings Boxes, which they say were advertised for $5 apiece. In May 2018, the lawsuit says, the couple saw Taco Bell's "Librarian" TV commercial for the $5 boxes and decided to drive to the Taco Bell on Route 22 for the deal that included a Chalupa Supreme, Five-Layer Burrito, Crunchy Taco, Cinnamon Twist and medium drink.

  • See Photos of the Volvo XC40 Recharge Electric SUV
    Car and Driver

    See Photos of the Volvo XC40 Recharge Electric SUV

    The first EV from Volvo promises up to 250 miles of range and free charging for a year. From Car and Driver

  • Cartel gunmen terrorize Mexican city, free El Chapo's son
    Reuters

    Cartel gunmen terrorize Mexican city, free El Chapo's son

    Heavily armed fighters surrounded security forces in a Mexican city on Thursday and made them free one of drug lord Joaquin 'El Chapo' Guzman's sons, after his capture triggered gunbattles and a prison break that sent civilians scurrying for cover. Security Minister Alfonso Durazo said a patrol by National Guard militarized police first came under attack from within a house in the city of Culiacan, 1,235 km (770 miles) northwest of Mexico City. After entering the house, they found four men, including Ovidio Guzman, who is accused of drug trafficking in the United States.

  • Rudy Giuliani’s Twitter Feed Is a Boomer Conspiracy-Theory Sh*tshow
    The Daily Beast

    Rudy Giuliani’s Twitter Feed Is a Boomer Conspiracy-Theory Sh*tshow

    Though Giuliani doesn't often RT or even like the content produced by the people he follows his taste for conspiracy theories does occasionally shine through, such as in August, when he quote-tweeted conspiracy theorist Matt Couch, a prolific promoter of the baseless idea that former Democratic National Committee staffer Seth Rich was murdered by Hillary Clinton. Couch has become so vocal in his attacks on the Rich family that Rich's brother filed a defamation suit against him. Giuliani promoted a tweet from Couch questioning the police narrative about Rich's 2016 murder, and later told The Daily Beast there are “legitimate questions” about the investigation.

  • Syria Truce Shaky as Erdogan, Kurds Disagree on What It Means
    Bloomberg

    Syria Truce Shaky as Erdogan, Kurds Disagree on What It Means

    Kurdish fighters say they have no intention of withdrawing from Syria's entire northeastern border -- but that's exactly what Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan expects to happen under the cease-fire accord brokered by the U.S. on Thursday. The conflicting interpretations point to the fragility of the five-day truce deal, which is already being tested with reports of continuing skirmishes between Turkish forces and Syria's Kurdish YPG militia, which is part of an autonomous administration in the northeast.

  • GM workers to stay on picket line until vote on new contract
    Associated Press

    GM workers to stay on picket line until vote on new contract

    Striking General Motors workers will stay on the picket lines for at least another week until they vote on a tentative contract with the company. Factory-level officials from the United Auto Workers union voted to recommend the agreement to members at a daylong meeting in Detroit Thursday. About 49,000 workers have been on strike for more than a month, paralyzing GM's U.S. factories and costing the company an estimated $2 billion.