How the U.S. Navy Sank Imperial Japan's Top Secret Aircraft Carrier

Warfare History Network
By Marine engineer Hiroshi Arakawa, Ishikawajima Shipyard. - 呉市海事歴史科学館所蔵品。, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=3579912

Warfare History Network

Security, Asia

The first torpedo struck farthest aft. Over the next 30 seconds three more warheads detonated against the massive aircraft carrier’s hull, working their way forward. The explosions and instant flooding immediately killed scores of men, many asleep in their bunks.

How the U.S. Navy Sank Imperial Japan's Top Secret Aircraft Carrier

“No doubt he intends to act as a decoy at some point to lure away our screening destroyers. That accomplished, his comrades can approach Shinano unopposed. We must guard against any such ploy,” grumbled the thoughtful skipper.

The first torpedo struck farthest aft. Over the next 30 seconds three more warheads detonated against the massive aircraft carrier’s hull, working their way forward. The explosions and instant flooding immediately killed scores of men, many asleep in their bunks.

As tons of seawater cascaded into the wounded colossus, men below deck could see the extent of the damage, were seized with panic, and stampeded topside. The missiles had hit 10 feet below the water line, and on the bridge and upper levels the commander and his officers were not yet aware of how sorely they were hurt. Many had survived earlier torpedo attacks, and aboard less formidable vessels than this one. Even as their gargantuan ship began to list, they remained optimistic.

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