UK government reveals when you might be able to go on a foreign holiday again

Abigail Malbon
Photo credit: serts - Getty Images

From Cosmopolitan

Never again will we take for granted the opportunity to go on overseas holidays. Coronavirus has put a stop to any foreign travel since March, and recently the government said it's likely that trips abroad will not be going ahead at all in 2020.

However, it appears they've backtracked a little now - and there's a chance you could still get the summer trip you've been dreaming about.

Health Secretary Matt Hancock appeared via video call on This Morning this week, and said he wouldn't rule out holidays going ahead as soon as July. Speaking to presenters Ruth and Eamonn, he said: "I am a little bit more optimistic than I was about being able to get some foreign travel back up.

"And so that is one of the things where things have gone a bit better than expected."

Photo credit: zstockphotos - Getty Images

When pushed for a specific date and asked if we might be able to fly somewhere in July, Hancock said: "I absolutely wouldn't rule it out.

"We've got to proceed cautiously. We've seen what happens when this virus gets out of control and we have as a country managed to get it back under control."

The Health Secretary's comments are in contrast to some he made just a few weeks ago on the show, when he said it's unlikely overseas travel will go ahead at all this year.

When asked if "summer was cancelled", he told the show: "I think that's likely to be the case."

Even if travel is allowed, some countries are enforcing strict quarantine for overseas visitors - and Greece has recently announced that it will not be allowing tourists from the UK to enter the country when it reopens to foreign travellers on 15 June.

A new rule will also come in to place on 8 June, stating that all returning travellers to Britain are required to quarantine for two weeks - however, Matt Hancock said this will be kept under constant review.

Either way, there's still been no official go ahead - so all we can do for now is sit back and wait for government advice (and maybe invest in a paddling pool).

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