UK weather: Temperatures to plummet to -6°C amid snow shower warning

Red deer stag in snow in Richmond Park, London  (PA)
Red deer stag in snow in Richmond Park, London (PA)

The weather is set to turn colder across the UK from this weekend with temperatures plummeting to -6°C and a warning of snow showers.

Though there is still some uncertainty in the outlook for early December, the Met Office says an easterly airflow in the next few days could bring settled, largely dry conditions and a continued risk of fog.

Over the weekend, temperatures will start to trend downwards, with a brisk easterly wind likely making it feel even colder.

The biting temperatures will be near or just below average for the time of year, only reaching mid to high single figures for many.

Met Office deputy chief meteorologist Tony Wardle said: “Uncertainties in the forecast start to develop as we head through next week with models offering two possible scenarios. We could continue in an easterly airflow, or we could see air crossing the UK from the north.

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“Both these scenarios will result in cold weather but, it is important to note, neither scenario will bring anything unusual for this time of year in the UK.”

The second scenario, which could see a northerly airflow rush through the country, would result in brighter, but colder weather with much of the UK seeing daytime temperatures not reaching more than 0C – 4C by day and -2C to -6C overnight.

Whichever scenario we find ourselves in, snow showers are expected, the Met Office says, though a northerly airflow brings with it an increased likelihood.

Temperatures prompted by an easterly airflow are unlikely to be as cold as in a northly airflow, with much of the UK seeing 2 to 5C by day and -2C to –4C at night.

However, the brisk easterly wind will continue to make it feel even colder, say forecasters. The weather will remain murky, but it will be drier, and any snow will be largely restricted to high ground in the north.