Ukraine war latest: Russian general, 5 high-ranking officials reportedly killed in Ukraine

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Key developments on Nov. 29:

  • Russian general reportedly killed by landmine in Ukraine

  • National Resistance Center: 5 high-ranking Russian officials killed in strike on occupied part of Kherson Oblast

  • Zelensky visits Mykolaiv, Kherson and Odesa oblasts

  • Kuleba meets with Stoltenberg, discusses Euro-Atlantic defense industry

  • Stoltenberg says Ukraine's ability to implement reforms during war is impressive

  • Poll: Only 5% of Ukrainians oppose joining EU, NATO.

Russian Major General Vladimir Zavadsky was killed in Ukraine, pro-Kremlin newspaper Lenta, along with other Russian media outlets, reported on Nov. 29.

His death was originally reported on Telegram channels on Nov. 28 and was later confirmed by Lenta and other sources.

Zavadsky, who was the deputy commander of the 14th Army Corps of the Russian Armed Forces, was reportedly killed by a landmine explosion.

Although Lenta wrote that Zavadsky was killed near Izium, Kharkiv Oblast, the location of his death might be different. Izium, liberated last September, now lies dozens of kilometers from the front line.

Zavadsky joined the list of other high-ranking Russian commanders killed in Ukraine.

The Russian independent media outlet Mediazona recently confirmed the names of five Russian major generals who have been killed since the full-scale invasion.

As the tally contains only names verified through open sources, it is not thought to be a complete picture of Russian losses, and the true figure is likely much higher.

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However, Russia rarely comments on the reported deaths of its high-ranking commanders in Ukraine.

Apart from Zavadsky's death, at least five high-ranking Russian officials had been killed in a strike on the Russian-occupied village of Yuvileine in Kherson Oblast, Ukraine's National Resistance Center also reported on Nov. 29.

According to the report, the strike occurred earlier on Nov. 28. Russian occupation authorities were supposedly meeting in the building when the attack took place, the center wrote on its Telegram channel, citing information from local residents.

Photographs published by the center show what appears to be a damaged administrative building flying a Russian flag.

The aftermath of a strike on a building in the occupied village of Yuvileine, Kherson Oblast, on Nov. 28, 2023. (National Resistance Center/Telegram)
The aftermath of a strike on a building in the occupied village of Yuvileine, Kherson Oblast, on Nov. 28, 2023. (National Resistance Center/Telegram)

There are several damaged cars near the building, including some that appear to belong to a Russian occupation "law enforcement service."

Zelensky visits southern Ukraine

President Volodymyr Zelensky went to Ukraine's south, visiting Kherson, Mykolaiv, and Odesa oblasts, on Nov. 29.

"Many issues were raised, almost all of them concerning security, protection of our state and people," Zelensky said during his regular evening address later in the day.

In Odesa, Zelensky held a meeting with regional leaders and Odesa city representatives on the impact of a recent storm that swept across the Black Sea region on Nov. 27.

The storm, which killed at least 12 people, caused significant damage to the area and left thousands of people in Odesa Oblast without electricity.

"In all regions, it is crucial to have a number of "Points of Invincibility" sufficient for any emergency situation, whether related to weather or security," Zelensky said, referring to mobile shelters that provide heating, electricity, and internet.

He then traveled to Mykolaiv Oblast, where he met with Danish Ambassador Ole Egberg Mikkelsen to discuss Denmark's patronage program for the region's rebuilding.

The Danish Embassy announced it would open a new office in Mykolaiv on Oct. 2, after Denmark pledged its support to restore the region.

In Kherson Oblast, Zelensky inspected civil protection facilities and visited the largest air raid shelter in Kherson city, which can shelter up to 250 people.

Kherson Oblast Governor Oleksandr Prokudin told Zelensky about plans to construct an underground perinatal center, which will include maternity wards, operating rooms, and intensive care units.

According to Prokudin, there are additional plans to build an entire hospital underground.

Zelensky also presented state awards to military personnel in Kherson and Odesa oblasts.

"I express gratitude to all who care for our state and our people! Thank you, Odesa, Mykolaiv, Kherson. Thank you all for this day. Glory to our strong nation!"

Read also: Francis Farrell: Ukraine could still lose the war. Let’s get some things straight

Ukraine and NATO

Foreign Minister Dmytro Kuleba met with NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg on Nov. 29.

The two agreed that Euro-Atlantic defense industries need to work together as one system to increase arms supplies, Kuleba said on a visit to the NATO headquarters in Brussels.

"We both agree that Euro-Atlantic defense industries need to work as one system to both ramp up supplies to Ukraine and strengthen NATO allies. This priority resonates well with them," Kuleba said on X, following his meeting with Stoltenberg.

Increasing arms production was a key topic of Kuleba's visit to Brussels, where he attended the NATO-Ukraine Council meeting of NATO foreign ministers.

"We discussed specific steps to create such an integrated system," Kuleba said. "NATO has a crucial coordinating role in bringing all allies and defense companies together."

Ukrainian Foreign Minister Dmytro Kuleba and NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg hold joint press statement during the meeting of NATO Ministers of Foreign Affairs at the NATO Headquarters in Brussels, Belgium on Nov. 29, 2023. (Dursun Aydemir/Anadolu via Getty Images)
Ukrainian Foreign Minister Dmytro Kuleba and NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg hold joint press statement during the meeting of NATO Ministers of Foreign Affairs at the NATO Headquarters in Brussels, Belgium on Nov. 29, 2023. (Dursun Aydemir/Anadolu via Getty Images)

During the press conference in Brussels on the same day, Stoltenberg said he was impressed by the pace of Ukraine's reforms, as well as the commitment of the Ukrainian government and people to implement them amid the full-scale war.

"(Ukraine has) made concrete changes, not least in the fight against (corruption)," he said, adding that these steps help Ukraine "to move closer to NATO membership."

According to a poll released by the Rating Sociology Group on Nov. 29, only 5% of Ukrainians are opposed to joining either the European Union or NATO.

An overwhelming majority of Ukrainians are in favor of joining both the EU and NATO, although the level of support has seen a slight decrease since the summer.

In total, 78% of Ukrainians would vote to join the EU if a referendum were held now, and 77% favor joining NATO.

"Ukraine is closer to NATO than ever before," Stoltenberg said on Nov. 29.

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