UK's first vegan butchers launches

In a corner of north London a new gleaming butchers is preparing to open - the only thing it lacks is meat.

To coincide with World Vegan Day on Sunday (November 1), Rudy's is launching Britain's first permanent vegan butcher.

Its products include 'baycon' and 'soysage'.

Matthew Foster is a co-founder:

"It's all designed to emulate meat. It tastes like meat, it's got meat-like texture. You cook it like meat, the only difference is it's made from plants so it's all ethically sourced, great for the environment, healthy."

Demand for vegan products has surged in recent years in Britain with people cutting back or cutting out animal-derived ingredients.

But not everyone is thrilled with the prospect.

The business received a message on Twitter from another butchers threatening to burn down its premises.

The surge in demand for alternative food products has sparked a debate over whether restaurants and shops should be allowed to use the names "burgers" or "sausages" for non meat products.

Lawmakers in the European Union ruled earlier in October that banning such terms, as advocated by farmers, would discourage consumers from shifting to more plant-based diets.

Video Transcript

- In a corner of North London a new gleaming butcher's is preparing to open. The only thing it lacks is meat. To coincide with World Vegan Day on Sunday, Rudy's is launching Britain's first permanent vegan butcher. Its products include baycon and soysage. Matthew Foster is a co-founder.

MATTHEW FOSTER: It's all designed to emulate meat. It tastes like meat. It's got a meat-like texture. You cook it like meat. The only difference is it's made with plants. So it's all ethically sourced, great for the environment, really healthy.

- Demand for vegan products has surged in recent years in Britain with people cutting back or cutting out animal-derived ingredients. But not everyone is thrilled with the prospect. The business received a message on Twitter from another butcher's threatening to burn down its premises.

The surge in demand for alternative food products has sparked debate over whether restaurants and shops should be allowed to use the names burgers or sausages for non-meat products. Lawmakers in the European Union ruled earlier in October that banning such terms, as advocated by farmers, would discourage consumers from shifting to more plant-based diets.