UN urges re-elected Guinea leader to form 'consensus' cabinet

Guinean President Alpha Conde, pictured here in Paris on October 26, 2015, was re-elected in a controversial landslide vote last month with 57.84 percent of the vote, dismissing opposition claims of vote rigging and fraud in the contested polls (AFP Photo/Alain Jocard)

Dakar (AFP) - Guinea's President Alpha Conde, who was re-elected in a controversial landslide vote last month, was urged by the UN's special regional envoy Monday to form a "wide consensus" government in the interests of peace.

Speaking in Senegal, the UN's west Africa envoy Mohamed Ibn Chambas praised Conde for holding talks with one of the troubled country's opposition leaders in the days following the October 11 vote.

"I hope this is just the beginning of wide consultations by the president to form a wide consensus government following his victory," said Ibn Chambas.

A consensus cabinet would be good for the region while helping Guinea get back on its feet after the Ebola crisis that added to its economic woes, he added.

Guinea's Constitutional Court on Saturday formally confirmed Conde's landslide re-election with 57.84 percent of the vote, dismissing opposition claims of vote rigging and fraud in the contested polls.

Appeals lodged by three of the seven candidates who ran against Conde that had called for the vote to be annulled were rejected by the court, which said they either lacked proof or had no bearing on the results.

Conde's main rival, opposition leader and former premier Cellou Dalein Diallo came second in the election with 31.45 percent.

He has refused to recognise the outcome of what he labelled an "illegal" vote tainted by mismanagement and fraud.

African and European Union observers also noted organisational problems but commended the high turnout and the peaceful nature of the polling day.

At least 13 people were killed in a week of violence in Guinea before and after the presidential election, with the security forces responsible for the deaths of unarmed civilians, Amnesty International said last week.

The election was only the second democratic presidential poll since Guinea gained independence from France in 1958.

The west African nation's first democratic election in 2010 went to a second round between Conde and Diallo, which Conde narrowly won.