The United Nations said at least 18 people were killed during Myanmar protests on Sunday

  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
Maria Arias
·2 min read
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.

At least 18 people were killed and 30 more injured during protests in Myanmar on Sunday, according to the United Nations Human Rights Office in a statement reported by CNN.

Driving the news: The New York Times reported it was the "largest single-day toll" since the coup on Feb. 1, in which the military forced out the civilian government led by Daw Aung San Suu Kyi.

Stay on top of the latest market trends and economic insights with Axios Markets. Subscribe for free

Details: There were only three protest-related deaths before Saturday. The United Nations now has reports of deaths “as a result of live ammunition fired into crowds” in the cities of Yangon, Mandalay, Dawei, Myeik, Bago and Pokokku.

  • At least three people were killed and more than 50 wounded in the southern city of Dawei, after police opened fire on a large crowd.

  • In Mandalay, a man was fatally shot through his motorcycle helmet while fleeing soldiers. A woman was also shot and killed as the police and soldiers reportedly fired at people at random.

  • In Myanmar’s largest city, Yangon, another protester was shot and killed at a demonstration in Thingangyun Township. A primary-school teacher died of a heart attack during a teachers protest as the police fired tear gas and rubber bullets near them.

Where it stands: Human rights organizations have called on the military to stop resorting to gunfire against protesters. Human Rights Watch said "any deaths and injuries should be the subject of an impartial investigation."

  • “We strongly condemn the escalating violence against protests in Myanmar and call on the military to immediately halt the use of force against peaceful protesters,” said Ravina Shamdasani, spokeswoman for the U.N. human rights office.

Go deeper: Myanmar military fires UN ambassador after anti-coup speech

More from Axios: Sign up to get the latest market trends with Axios Markets. Subscribe for free