UofL Athletic Director believes football will start on time, fan experience will change

UofL Athletic Director believes football will start on time, fan experience will change

  • Japan is 'shocked' and furious at the US after a major coronavirus outbreak at 2 Marine bases in Okinawa — and says the US is not taking the virus seriously
    Business Insider

    Japan is 'shocked' and furious at the US after a major coronavirus outbreak at 2 Marine bases in Okinawa — and says the US is not taking the virus seriously

    Japanese authorities say they are "shocked" after a significant coronavirus outbreak at two US Marine bases in the country. 61 Marines have been infected with the virus in recent days, spread across two bases in Okinawa prefecture, home to about 26,000 US service personnel. "We now have strong doubts that the US military has taken adequate disease prevention measures," Okinawa governor Denny Tamaki said at a press conference.

  • Mitt Romney calls Trump's Roger Stone commutation 'unprecedented, historic corruption'
    USA TODAY

    Mitt Romney calls Trump's Roger Stone commutation 'unprecedented, historic corruption'

    Sen. Mitt Romney, R-Utah, strongly criticized President Donald Trump's commutation for longtime friend and former campaign aide Roger Stone, calling it "unprecedented, historic corruption." "Unprecedented, historic corruption: an American president commutes the sentence of a person convicted by a jury of lying to shield that very president," Romney wrote on Twitter Saturday morning. Trump granted Stone clemency days before he was to report to prison for a 40-month sentence.

  • Reuters

    U.S. prison employee preparing for executions tests positive for coronavirus

    A staff member involved in the preparation of the first executions of U.S. federal prisoners in 17 years has tested positive for the novel coronavirus, the Bureau of Prisons said on Sunday. In a court filing, the bureau said the employee based at the Justice Department's execution chamber in Terre Haute, Indiana, attended a meeting with outside law enforcement in preparation for the scheduled executions and another meeting on how to handle any demonstrators. He did not come into contact with members of the execution protocol team, the bureau said.

  • City mulls razing site where 1st Alaska flag flew
    Associated Press

    City mulls razing site where 1st Alaska flag flew

    The fate of one of Alaska's most historic yet neglected structures could be decided Monday as city officials in Seward weigh whether to demolish a former Methodist boarding school where the Alaska territorial flag was first flown almost a century ago and where its Alaska Native designer lived. Benny Benson was among the orphans and displaced children who lived at the Jesse Lee Home, many of whom were sent there after the Spanish flu devastated Alaska Native villages. Benson, a 13-year-old Aleut boy sent to the home after his mother died of the flu, won a territory-wide contest in 1927 to design the flag, which became the state flag after statehood was granted in 1959.

  • Coronavirus: Florida sets new state daily case record of 15,299
    BBC

    Coronavirus: Florida sets new state daily case record of 15,299

    Florida has registered a state record of 15,299 new coronavirus cases in 24 hours - around a quarter of all of the United States' daily infections. The state, with just 7% of the US population, surpassed the previous daily record held by California. Florida, which began lifting coronavirus restrictions in May, has proved vulnerable due to tourism and an elderly population.

  • University professors fear returning to campus as coronavirus cases surge
    NBC News

    University professors fear returning to campus as coronavirus cases surge

    However, professors were initially required to return to campus to teach in person and there wasn't an option to work remotely. The university later put in place a policy where faculty could file a request to work remotely, but there wasn't a guarantee that the request would be accommodated. Boston University philosophy professors Daniel Star and Russell Powell wrote an open letter to the university urging it to allow professors to make their own decisions about returning to campus.

  • Giant protests in Russia after popular governor's arrest
    AFP

    Giant protests in Russia after popular governor's arrest

    At least 10,000 protesters marched through the eastern Russian city of Khabarovsk Saturday in support of a popular local governor arrested this week for allegedly ordering several murders. A court in Moscow on Friday ruled to hold 50-year-old Sergei Furgal for two months pending trial for the murders of several businessmen 15 years ago. Furgal's nationalist Liberal-Democratic Party has thrown its weight behind the governor, and on Saturday said "35,000 people came out to the streets" in Khabarovsk to protest his arrest.

  • Iran agency says chain of errors caused Ukrainian plane crash
    Reuters

    Iran agency says chain of errors caused Ukrainian plane crash

    Iran's Civil Aviation Organisation blamed a misalignment of a radar system and lack of communication between the air defence operator and his commanders for the accidental downing of a Ukrainian passenger plane in January that killed 176 people aboard. Iran's Revolutionary Guards shot down the Ukraine International Airlines flight with a ground-to-air missile on Jan. 8 shortly after the plane took off from Tehran,in what Tehran later acknowledged as a “disastrous mistake” by forces who were on high alert during a confrontation with the United States. "A mistake in aligning the radar system had caused human error.

  • South Africa's 9 million smokers were faced with cold turkey when the government banned cigarette sales in March as a coronavirus measure. Now Big Tobacco is fighting back.
    INSIDER

    South Africa's 9 million smokers were faced with cold turkey when the government banned cigarette sales in March as a coronavirus measure. Now Big Tobacco is fighting back.

    earlier in July. South Africa's government had also banned the sale of alcohol but has since eased that restriction, which according to an AP report, has led to an increase in "drunken brawls and traffic accidents, putting added strain on hospitals as they deal with the virus." Reuters FITA is also arguing that by banning the legal sale of cigarettes, the South African government is encouraging a black market trade, and putting thousands of jobs at risk.

  • Couple who threatened Black Lives Matter protesters with guns once destroyed children's beehives
    Yahoo News Video

    Couple who threatened Black Lives Matter protesters with guns once destroyed children's beehives

    St. Louis couple Mark and Patricia McCloskey drew national attention in June when they flashed guns at Black Lives Matter protesters walking down their street.

  • A revival of ultrafast supersonic passenger jet travel is inching closer to reality – take a look at the prototype debuting in October
    Business Insider

    A revival of ultrafast supersonic passenger jet travel is inching closer to reality – take a look at the prototype debuting in October

    Boom Supersonic Aircraft start-up Boom Supersonic is one step closer to bringing back supersonic passenger travel with its flagship Overture jet. The Overture's prototype and demonstrator, the XB-1, will be unveiled in October and plans to take to the skies in 2021. If the XB-1 has a successful test flight program, the Overture could fly within the next 10 years, bringing back supersonic travel to the public.

  • Jeff Sessions swings back at Trump for 'juvenile insults' as fight for political future looms in Alabama
    NY Daily News

    Jeff Sessions swings back at Trump for 'juvenile insults' as fight for political future looms in Alabama

    Former Attorney General Jeff Sessions lashed out Saturday at President Donald Trump after his onetime ally launched another salvo ahead of the Republican Senate primary run-off on Tuesday in Alabama. Sessions, whom Trump has derided as “Mr. Magoo,” touted himself as a trusted and independent conservative. “My honor and integrity are far more important than these juvenile insults,” Sessions wrote in a reply to Trump on Twitter.

  • Coronavirus can damage the heart, major study finds
    The Telegraph

    Coronavirus can damage the heart, major study finds

    Coronavirus can damage the heart, with more than half of hospitalised patients revealing abnormal scans, a major new study has found. A survey of 69 countries, funded by the British Heart Foundation (BHF), found that 55 per cent of 1,261 patients studied had abnormal changes to the way their heart was pumping, with around one in seven showing evidence of severe dysfunction. The majority (901 patients) had never been diagnosed with heart problems before, leading scientists to conclude that Covid-19 itself may seriously affect the heart.

  • Walt Disney World reopens in Florida amid Covid-19 surge
    BBC

    Walt Disney World reopens in Florida amid Covid-19 surge

    Walt Disney World Resort has begun to reopen in Florida despite a coronavirus surge across the US state. Epcot and Disney's Hollywood Studios are expected to follow from 15 July. More than a quarter of a million cases of Covid-19 have been reported in Florida, along with 4,197 deaths.

  • Here’s How Black Power Finally Prevailed in Mississippi State Flag Fight
    The Daily Beast

    Here’s How Black Power Finally Prevailed in Mississippi State Flag Fight

    After many years demanding the removal of the Confederate battle flag from the state flag, Black Mississippians received their wish when a bill doing that was signed into law last week. Just as the state flag had served as a symbol of white supremacy for 126 years, beginning nearly 30 years after the Confederacy's defeat, the lowering of the flag for the final time by a Black man symbolized Black Power. Mississippi's Declaration of the Immediate Causes which Induce and Justify the Secession of the State of Mississippi from the Federal Union clearly states that “our position is thoroughly identified with the institution of slavery.”

  • Associated Press

    Pakistan says 4 troops, 4 militants killed in shootout in NW

    Pakistan's military on Sunday said four soldiers and four militants were killed during a shootout in the rugged northwestern region of North Waziristan, which borders Afghanistan. A statement from the military's public relations wing said the exchange of fire took place after the army personnel had surrounded the militant hideout early Sunday. The statement did not identify the militants, but Pakistan's military has been battling members of the Pakistani Taliban group, known as the Tehreek-e-Taliban (TTP) in that region for years.

  • Foreign doctors' hopes for fast-track pandemic licenses in Canada fading
    Reuters

    Foreign doctors' hopes for fast-track pandemic licenses in Canada fading

    Canada's effort to fast-track careers of foreign-trained doctors to meet growing patient numbers during the COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in only about two dozen licenses approved in Ontario and none in British Columbia, according to medical colleges in both provinces. As Canada faced the prospect of the pandemic swamping the country's healthcare system, British Columbia created a new class of license that would allow overseas-trained doctors to practice under the supervision of a fully licensed doctor, similar to licenses that exist in other provinces, such as Alberta.

  • Bosnia Muslims mourn their dead 25 years after Srebrenica massacre
    AFP

    Bosnia Muslims mourn their dead 25 years after Srebrenica massacre

    Bosnian Muslims marked the 25th anniversary of the Srebrenica massacre on Saturday, the worst atrocity on European soil since World War II, with the memorial ceremony sharply reduced as a result of the coronavirus pandemic. Many mourners braved the tighter restrictions put in place to stem the spread of COVID-19 to attend the commemorations which culminated in a ceremony laying to rest the remains of nine victims identified over the past year. On July 11, 1995, after capturing Srebrenica, Serb forces killed more than 8,000 Muslim men and boys in a few days.

  • Phoenix mayor says city still has "a real challenge with testing"
    CBS News

    Phoenix mayor says city still has "a real challenge with testing"

    Washington – Amid a spike of coronavirus infections across the Sun Belt and the West, Phoenix Mayor Kate Gallego said her city still faces a "real challenge" with coronavirus testing, echoing the concerns governors on the East Coast raised as their own states battled rising infections earlier in the pandemic. "It continues to be a very difficult situation in the greater Phoenix area," Gallego said Sunday on "Face the Nation." "We are seeing positivity rates above 20%.

  • Shooting of man by Baltimore police highlights 'total failure' of city's behavioral health response, agency says
    Baltimore Sun

    Shooting of man by Baltimore police highlights 'total failure' of city's behavioral health response, agency says

    After Baltimore police officers shot a man who pulled a firearm while undergoing a behavioral health crisis last week, the organization that oversees the city's behavioral health services called the current system “a total failure” that needs better integration of mental health professionals with the police. There is no indication that police dispatchers attempted to connect available behavioral health resources with officers on the scene before they shot Ricky Walker Jr. on July 1, said Adrienne Breidenstine, vice president of policy and communications for Behavioral Health System Baltimore. The city has two so-called crisis response teams that handle mental health issues, one inside the police department and another at the nonprofit Baltimore Crisis Response Inc. Breidenstine said the incident highlights how the city has created an unnecessarily complex system to deal with people in crisis.

  • As coronavirus cases climb, Trump says states with an uptick in cases are 'going to be fine' and will be back to normal 'very quickly'
    INSIDER

    As coronavirus cases climb, Trump says states with an uptick in cases are 'going to be fine' and will be back to normal 'very quickly'

    Coronavirus death rates are on the rise amid a recent uptick of cases in states including California, Arizona, Florida, and Texas. In response to the resurgence in cases, President Donald Trump told Noticias Telemundo these states "are going to be fine" and will "have it under control very quickly." Coronavirus deaths are once again on the rise amid a surge of confirmed cases in states like Arizona, California, Texas, and Florida — and President Donald Trump claims these regions are "going to be fine."

  • Russia's journalists under increasing pressure from the secret services in wake of Putin's shaky referendum victory
    The Telegraph

    Russia's journalists under increasing pressure from the secret services in wake of Putin's shaky referendum victory

    Russia's intelligence services have 'stepped up' their war on free media, carrying out a series of operations designed to intimidate journalists in the wake of Vladimir Putin's controversial referendum victory last week. In an unprecedented case for post-Soviet Russia, prominent defence reporter Ivan Safronov was seized outside his home on Tuesday morning by secret service agents and arrested on suspicion of treason. Last week's overwhelming approval of constitutional amendments allowing Vladimir Putin to stay in office at least until 2036 was hailed by the Kremlin as a “triumph.”

  • Xu Zhangrun: Outspoken professor freed after six days
    BBC

    Xu Zhangrun: Outspoken professor freed after six days

    An outspoken critic of China's rulers, Professor Xu Zhangrun, has been released after six days in police custody, friends say. The Beijing constitutional law professor was already under house arrest when he was detained on 6 July. He had criticised China's response to coronavirus and what he sees as a Mao-like cult of personality under China's current leader, Xi Jinping.

  • ‘Racist, hurtful and deeply inappropriate.’ California CEO resigns after racist rant
    Miami Herald

    ‘Racist, hurtful and deeply inappropriate.’ California CEO resigns after racist rant

    A Silicon Valley tech CEO has resigned over a viral video of his ejection from a California restaurant for his racist tirade directed at an Asian family celebrating a birthday. “I have once again begun my journey back to sobriety and have enrolled in an anti-racist program with immediate effect,” said former Solid8 CEO Michael Lofthouse in a statement Saturday, reported The San Francisco Chronicle. “My comments towards the families involved were racist, hurtful and deeply inappropriate,” Lofthouse said, according to the publication.

  • Seattle mayor and police chief told to remedy ‘unacceptable’ arrest of Independent journalist
    The Independent

    Seattle mayor and police chief told to remedy ‘unacceptable’ arrest of Independent journalist

    Seattle's mayor and police chief have been told to remedy the “unacceptable” treatment of journalists, including an Independent reporter who was arrested covering Black Lives Matter protests. Andrew Buncombe was shackled, assaulted and detained for more than six hours after being accused of “failing to disperse” from a demonstration he had the legal right to report on. On the same day, local journalist Omari Salisbury, a common presence at Cal Anderson Park, said he was threatened with arrest unless he stopped broadcasting as police cleared the Capitol Hill Occupied Protest (CHOP).