The US Army is coming out with a 'tactical' bra that female soldiers could work into their body armor

·2 min read
A soldier wears a sports bra that served as an early mock-up sample for conceptualization of the Army Tactical Brassiere.
A soldier wears a sports bra that served as an early mock-up sample for conceptualization of the Army Tactical Brassiere.Courtesy of DEVCOM Soldier Center.
  • The US Army is developing a "tactical bra" for women soldiers called the Army Tactical Brassiere.

  • It would be the first bra developed by the Army and a "win for female Soldiers," a spokesperson said.

  • There are four prototypes, including pull-over, compression, and zippered-closure bras.

The US Army is developing a "tactical bra" for women soldiers to add protection to their existing body armor.

The Army Tactical Brassiere could be the first of its kind to be added to the official army uniform for female soldiers.

It would be a "win for female Soldiers across the Army," said Jeff Sisto, a spokesperson from the Combat Capabilities Development Command Soldier Center, per the Army Times.

Four prototypes are in the works, according to the outlet. Concepts A and B are pull-over sports bras; Concept C offers compression with cross-body straps in the back; Concept D has a zippered front closure.

The bra will be more "tactical rather than sportswear item," so designers are considering "enhanced protection" options, including flame-retardant fabrics, according to the Army.

"The overall goal is to produce garments that not only protect the user but reduce the cognitive burden on the female Soldier caused by discomfort and ill fit," said Ashley Cushon, a designer at the Soldier Center, per an Army statement.  "Achieving this will improve the Soldier's overall readiness and performance levels, allowing them to focus on their mission."

It may be a welcome development for female soldiers, who make up about 15% of Army soldiers. One woman described going through basic training in 2002 with a standard-issue bra from a reception station after the Army confiscated her personal clothes.

"If racerbacks were uncomfortable for you, too bad. If you needed more support, too bad. If the store was out of your size, too bad," Sarah Hoyt told the Washington Post. "I was very uncomfortable, to put it mildly."

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