US election 2020: The Democrat candidates who are running for president

Our Foreign Staff
Tulsi Gabbard, Julian Castro and Elizabeth Warren will all vie to win the Democrat nomination

Tulsi Gabbard, the Democratic US Representative of Hawaii, has become the latest Democrat to throw her hat in the ring for the US presidential election in 2020. 

In remarks aired by CNN on Friday, Ms Gabbard said she intended to pursue a challenge to Republican President Donald Trump.

"I have decided to run and will be making a formal announcement within the next week," Ms Gabbard said.

She is the latest to join what is expected to be a crowded Democratic primary field before the November 2020 presidential election.

Here are all the Democrats who have announced they will be running. 

Elizabeth Warren

The US Senator of Massachusetts announced on December 31 she had formed an exploratory committee for a presidential run in 2020.

The following week, Ms Warren informally kicked off the nominating fight on a visit to Iowa, condemning the corrupting influence of money on politics and lamenting lost economic opportunities for working families.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren speaks during an organising event at Curate event space in Des Moines, Iowa Credit: AP

In the state that holds the first presidential nominating contest in 13 months, Ms Warren introduced herself to Iowa crowds with tales of her working-class upbringing in Oklahoma and emphasised her signature theme of income inequality.

"Washington works great for those with money but not for anyone else. We need to call this what it is, corruption pure and simple," the Massachusetts senator told Democrats in Sioux City on the second of five public stops during her three-day visit.

So far she is the biggest name to enter the Democratic field.

Read the full profile of Elizabeth Warren. 

Julian Castro

The former San Antonio mayor has been widely tipped as a rising star in the Democratic Party for years and announced his presidential campaign on January 12. 

"I'm running for president because it's time for new leadership. Because it's time for new energy," the 44-year-old said. "And it's time for a new commitment to make sure that the opportunities I've had are available for every American."

Mr Castro is the grandson of a Mexican immigrant who would be the first Hispanic elected president. He also served as housing and urban development secretary during Barack Obama's presidency. 

Julian Castro, former United States Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, speaks at the Netroots Nation annual conference for political progressives in New Orleans Credit: Reuters

 

Mr Castro has sought to use his family's personal story to challenge Mr Trump's border policies - including criticising the president by name in his launch speech.

"Yes, we must have border security, but there is a smart and humane way to do it. And there is no way in hell that caging children is keeping us safe," Mr Castro said. 

 

Read the full profile of Julian Castro. 

John Delaney

The Democrat congressman from Maryland was the first to throw his hat into the ring when he made his announcement in September, 2017.

The 55-year-old said he was not seeking a fourth term in Congress, instead devoting time and money to his White House campaign. 

Representative John Delaney, a Democrat from Maryland, was the first to throw his hat in the ring Credit: Bloomberg

Mr Delaney launched a pre-emptive strike to win some name recognition.

"I think am the right person for the job, but not enough people know that," he told the Telegraph at the time at a gathering of around 40 Democratic activists held in a suburban home in southern New Hampshire.

"So the way I solve that problem is by getting in early and spending more time."

Mr Delaney pitch is unashamedly moderate, this could prove to be a weakness at a time when some Democrats have buyer's remorse at having opted for Hillary Clinton rather than Bernie Sanders, whose campaign captured the public imagination

Read the full profile of John Delaney.

Tulsi Gabbard

Gabbard, an Iraq War veteran who is the first Hindu elected to Congress and the first member born in the US territory of American Samoa, said "the issue of war and peace" would be the main focus of her campaign. 

The 37-year-old's run would not be without controversy. In 2016, she alarmed fellow Democrats when she met with Donald Trump during his transition to president and later when she took a secret trip to Syria and met with President Bashar Assad, who has been accused of war crimes and genocide. She questioned whether he was responsible for a chemical attack on civilians that killed dozens and led the U.S. to attack a Syrian air base.

Representative Gabbard delivers a nomination speech for Sanders on the second day at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia Credit: Reuters

She said she doesn't regret the trip and considers it important to meet with adversaries if "you are serious about pursuing peace." She also noted that the 2003 invasion of Iraq was based on faulty intelligence and said that she wanted to understand the evidence of the Syria attack.

Gabbard was one of the most prominent lawmakers to back Sanders over Hillary Clinton in the 2016 Democratic presidential primary. Her endorsement came in dramatic fashion, with her resigning as a vice chairwoman of the Democratic National Committee to express her support.

Likely contenders

The Democrat field could draw dozens of candidates.

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand is moving aggressively toward an expected presidential bid, filling out key staff positions, travelling to key states and nearing a choice on the location for a campaign headquarters, according to multiple people familiar with the discussions.

California Sen. Kamala Harris, New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, are all weighing their own presidential bids and are expected to announce decisions in the upcoming weeks.

Vice President Joe Biden is also mulling whether to run in what is expected to be a long and potentially divisive presidential primary.