US mayor not on registry, can't vote in primary

Kansas City Mayor Quinton Lucas, pictured on February 5, 2020, said he would be back later in the day to vote (AFP Photo/Kyle Rivas)

Washington (AFP) - The mayor of Kansas City said Tuesday he was unable to vote at his usual station for the Missouri Democratic primary because he couldn't be found on voter registration lists.

"I made a video this morning about the importance of voting and then got turned away because I wasn't in the system even though I've voted there for 11 years, including for myself four times!" tweeted Quinton Lucas.

The mayor since 2019 of Missouri's largest city added that he would be back later in the day to vote.

"If the mayor can get turned away, think about everyone else... We've got to do better," Lucas said in a separate tweet.

The Midwestern state is one of six that votes Tuesday to choose which of Democratic presidential hopefuls Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders should face off against President Donald Trump in November.

Voter suppression is a perennial complaint in US elections, largely in Republican-led states where critics say tough rules to combat fraud dissuade legitimate voters from the poorest, non-white communities.

Lucas, who is black, told the The Kansas City Star organizers had explained that a poll worker had accidentally switched the mayor's first and last names, making it impossible to find him on the voter roll.

Lucas said it was "clearly something that should not have happened, cannot happen."

He noted that he got an explanation because he is the mayor, but most Kansas City residents never get one.

"I think the biggest threat to American elections is that Americans can't vote too often," he said, referring to the numerous administrative obstacles that discourage voters, particularly in the black community.

The Democratic director of the Kansas City Board of Elections, Lauri Ealom, apologized to the mayor on Twitter.

She said it was always possible to vote via provisional ballot, which uses a temporary envelope with a receipt to verify that the ballot has been counted.

  • New Yahoo News/YouGov coronavirus poll shows Americans turning against Trump
    Yahoo News

    New Yahoo News/YouGov coronavirus poll shows Americans turning against Trump

    With more than 400,000 confirmed coronavirus cases and 14,000 deaths in the United States, a new Yahoo News/YouGov poll shows that Americans are souring on President Trump's leadership during the pandemic. After a brief period during which some polls found more Americans approving of Trump's coronavirus response than not, half of them (50 percent) now disapprove, according to the Yahoo News/YouGov survey, compared to only 42 percent who approve. The public figure who has earned the highest approval ratings for his work on the pandemic is Dr. Anthony Fauci, the infectious disease expert on the White House coronavirus task force.

  • Coronavirus is ushering in a new wave of racially motivated attacks, warns intelligence bulletin
    Yahoo News

    Coronavirus is ushering in a new wave of racially motivated attacks, warns intelligence bulletin

    Federal agencies are concerned that domestic extremists could use the coronavirus pandemic to attack Asians and Jews, according to a joint intelligence bulletin obtained by Yahoo News. That bulletin mirrors what organizations that monitor online hate content are also finding. The bulletin, a joint effort of the Department of Justice, the National Counterterrorism Center and the Department of Homeland Security, is dated April 7.

  • Doctors rethinking coronavirus: Are we using ventilators the wrong way?
    Yahoo News

    Doctors rethinking coronavirus: Are we using ventilators the wrong way?

    One doctor who has been treating COVID-19 patients at a New York-area hospital says there's no reason to believe it would work. Marik acknowledged that the World Health Organization has advised against the use of corticosteroids to treat viral pneumonia in patients with COVID-19 (except in clinical trials) citing previous studies on other viral diseases like SARS and MERS, which found insufficient evidence that the drugs were effective. But Marik's view encapsulates a growing suspicion among doctors treating COVID-19 that the disease has some novel features that may require a unique approach.

  • Coronavirus: WHO chief and Taiwan in row over 'racist' comments
    BBC

    Coronavirus: WHO chief and Taiwan in row over 'racist' comments

    A row has erupted after the chief of the World Health Organization (WHO) accused Taiwan's leaders of spearheading personal attacks on him. WHO chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said he had been subjected to racist comments and death threats for months. But President Tsai Ing-wen said Taiwan opposed any form of discrimination, and invited Dr Tedros to visit the island.

  • Coronavirus: California woman arrested for licking $1,800 worth of groceries
    AFP

    Coronavirus: California woman arrested for licking $1,800 worth of groceries

    A California woman has been arrested after licking $1,800 worth of groceries and other items at a supermarket in the northern part of the state, police said Wednesday. Chris Fiore, spokesman for the South Lake Tahoe police department, near the border with Nevada, told AFP that officers were called to the Safeway store on Tuesday following reports of "a customer licking groceries" at a time of heightened fears over the spread of the highly contagious novel coronavirus. "When officers arrived on the scene, a Safeway employee informed them that the suspect put numerous pieces of jewelry from the store on her hands," he said.

  • New York state reports more coronavirus cases than any country except the U.S.: Reuters tally
    Reuters

    New York state reports more coronavirus cases than any country except the U.S.: Reuters tally

    The U.S. state has 149,316 reported cases compared with Spain at 146,690. In total, the United States has recorded over 417,000 cases and 14,100 deaths, according to the Reuters tally. European countries, including hardest-hit Italy and Spain, have started looking ahead to easing lockdowns but their coronavirus-related fatality rates have fluctuated after initially showing a decline.

  • Japan to Pay Companies to Move Production Out of China
    National Review

    Japan to Pay Companies to Move Production Out of China

    Japan will devote more than $2.2 billion of its coronavirus economic stimulus package to incentivize its manufacturers to move their production out of China as relations fray between the neighboring countries in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic. The record stimulus plan provides $2 billion for manufacturers to transfer production to Japan and over $216 million to help companies move production to other countries. Imports from China, Japan's biggest trading partner, were down by nearly 50 percent in February as facilities in China closed while the coronavirus ripped through the country.

  • Coronavirus: 13 Coral Princess guests stuck aboard; Australian police raid Ruby Princess
    USA TODAY

    Coronavirus: 13 Coral Princess guests stuck aboard; Australian police raid Ruby Princess

    The airlift of passengers off the Coral Princess cruise ship continued Thursday – except for 13 foreign travelers aren't being allowed to depart and will have to stay on board for now. Although five charter flights – one domestic and four bound for Europe and South America – were scheduled to depart Thursday, Princess Cruises said it ran into red tape while trying to help those 13 get home. "Despite continued efforts through diplomatic channels, current travel restrictions by home countries will prevent homeward travel for 13 international guests, and local authorities will not authorize the use of local hotels," the cruise line said in a statement.

  • Turkey's COVID-19 infection rate is the fastest rising in the world. Here's why it got so many cases so quickly.
    INSIDER

    Turkey's COVID-19 infection rate is the fastest rising in the world. Here's why it got so many cases so quickly.

    In less than three weeks, the country would witness one of the steepest rises of cases in the world. Ayse Yildiz/Anadolu Agency / Getty Sources: The New Yorker, The New York Times On March 11, after the first case was announced, Koca told state media: "If there is an infection in the country, it is very limited. The coronavirus is not stronger than the measures we will take."

  • Trump approval dips as Americans question his handling of coronavirus crisis
    NBC News

    Trump approval dips as Americans question his handling of coronavirus crisis

    President Donald Trump's job approval has taken a negative turn as a growing number of Americans harbor doubts about his handling of the coronavirus crisis. After seeing a late-March spike as the pandemic ravaged the United States, his approval ratings have fallen back to the mid-40 percent range, where they were before the death toll and jobless claims exploded. The figure dovetails surveys showing the president narrowly trailing former Vice President Joe Biden, who this week became the apparent Democratic nominee to face him in November.

  • This is what I want my friends to do if they have COVID-19 symptoms and are asked to go to the ER
    Yahoo News

    This is what I want my friends to do if they have COVID-19 symptoms and are asked to go to the ER

    Ashita S. Batavia, MD, MSc, is a board-certified infectious diseases specialist and public health expert with extensive experience in treating epidemics. In my state, New York, our hospital systems are being strained in unprecedented ways. As a frontline infectious diseases doctor, this is what I want my friends and neighbors to do if they have COVID-19 symptoms and are asked to go to the emergency room.

  • NYC Is Taking Hundreds of Body Bags Out of Houses—and Soon They Will Be Counted
    The Daily Beast

    NYC Is Taking Hundreds of Body Bags Out of Houses—and Soon They Will Be Counted

    The coronavirus death count in New York City, already unfathomable, is expected to surge in the coming days as officials begin including people who have been dropping dead at home without an official diagnosis. Emergency Medical Service data first reported by Gothamist suggests the undercount of individuals who have likely died from the virus is massive. Until this month, about 25 people in New York City were found dead in their homes on a typical day, suggesting that most of Tuesday's calls were related to the outbreak that has already killed over 5,400 people across the state and infected 140,386 more.

  • Russia aims to prosecute destruction of war monuments abroad
    Associated Press

    Russia aims to prosecute destruction of war monuments abroad

    Russia's defense minister called on law enforcement officials Wednesday to consider filing criminal charges against representatives of other countries where World War II memorials commemorating the actions of the Soviet Union are demolished. Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu made the appeal to the head of the Investigative Committee, Russia's top criminal investigation body. Russia takes offense at any criticism of the Soviet role in the war.

  • This is how coughing can spread coronavirus in a store, according to researchers
    CBS News

    This is how coughing can spread coronavirus in a store, according to researchers

    Research from Finland attempts to show how fast and far a single cough can spread the kind of aerosol particles that carry the new coronavirus through a typical grocery store. A digital model built by Aalto University in Finland, using data gathered by researchers there and at three other research institutes, was released with a warning: "It is important to avoid busy public indoor spaces." Aalto University, the Finnish Meteorological Institute, VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland and the University of Helsinki all conducted the same digital modeling experiment independently, and they all got pretty much the same preliminary data.

  • India says lockdown has spared it from overwhelming number of coronavirus cases
    Reuters

    India says lockdown has spared it from overwhelming number of coronavirus cases

    The Indian government on Thursday claimed initial success in its fight against the coronavirus epidemic, saying it would have been hit with 820,000 cases by next week had it not imposed a nationwide lockdown. Prime Minister Narendra Modi's decision to order 1.3 billion Indians indoors for three weeks in the world's biggest lockdown has helped slow the infection rate, foreign ministry additional secretary Vikas Swarup said, even though it has exacted a heavy toll on the economy and on the hundreds of million of poor. By the middle of April, the caseload would have touched 820,000, he said, citing an internal assessment of the government's Indian Council of Medical Research, far more than the country's underfunded and decrepit public health system could handle.

  • Photos show thousands packing into cars, planes, and trains in a rush to get out of Wuhan as China lifts the coronavirus lockdown
    Business Insider

    Photos show thousands packing into cars, planes, and trains in a rush to get out of Wuhan as China lifts the coronavirus lockdown

    Xinhua/Cheng Min via Getty Images On Wednesday at midnight, Chinese authorities began allowing outbound travel from Wuhan, the city where the first coronavirus cases were reported last year. Throngs of people who can prove they are healthy are rushing out of the city by car, plane, and train. Travel from Wuhan was restricted for 76 days in an effort to keep the novel coronavirus outbreak contained.

  • Adam Schiff says Intelligence Committee may conduct 'Zoom hearings' during current pandemic
    Yahoo News Video

    Adam Schiff says Intelligence Committee may conduct 'Zoom hearings' during current pandemic

    House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif. says he is considering using the teleconferencing software Zoom to hold hearings into foreign election interference and other key issues, including the firing of intelligence community inspector general Michael Atkinson, while social distancing restrictions remain in place due to the coronavirus pandemic.

  • Two suspects arrested after Wisconsin doctor and husband were 'targeted' and killed, police say
    USA TODAY

    Two suspects arrested after Wisconsin doctor and husband were 'targeted' and killed, police say

    MILWAUKEE - Two suspects have been arrested in the double homicide of a University of Wisconsin doctor and her husband. Ali'jah J. Larrue, 18, was taken into custody Friday evening and booked into the Dane County Jail on two counts of party to a crime of first-degree intentional homicide. Early Friday, UWPD arrested Khari Sanford, 18, who also was charged with two counts of party to a crime of first degree intentional homicide.

  • Chuck Grassley Demands Explanation for Trump’s Firing of IG Who Advanced Ukraine Whistleblower Report
    National Review

    Chuck Grassley Demands Explanation for Trump’s Firing of IG Who Advanced Ukraine Whistleblower Report

    Senate Finance Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley (R., Iowa) is preparing a bipartisan letter to send to President Trump over the Friday-night firing of Intelligence Community Inspector General Michael Atkinson. Grassley, a Trump ally who has an ongoing probe into the Department of Defense's role in supporting Stefan Halper, who spied on the 2016 Trump campaign, has released several statements in the wake of Atkinson's firing that have suggested he is unsatisfied with the administration's logic behind the move. Congress has been crystal clear that written reasons must be given when IGs are removed for a lack of confidence.

  • Pakistan shoots down Indian drone as Kashmir tensions rise
    AFP

    Pakistan shoots down Indian drone as Kashmir tensions rise

    Pakistan's army said Thursday it had shot down a small Indian surveillance drone in Kashmir, as tensions rose over continued cross-border shelling in the disputed territory. According to a statement from the army media wing, the Indian quadcopter -- about the same size as a commercially available hobby drone -- had crossed 600 metres (650 yards) over the de facto border known as the Line of Control (LoC). "This blatant act was aggressively responded to by Pakistan Army troops shooting down Indian quadcopter," the statement read.

  • Coronavirus: New York has more cases than any country
    BBC

    Coronavirus: New York has more cases than any country

    New York state now has more coronavirus cases than any other country outside the US, according to latest figures. While New York state leads the world in coronavirus cases, its death toll (7,000) lags behind Spain (15,500) and Italy (18,000), though it is more than double the official figure from China (3,300). Photos have emerged of workers in hazmat outfits burying coffins in a mass grave in New York City.

  • Head of Global Strike Command Wants to Make Air Force Bombers Even More Lethal
    Military.com

    Head of Global Strike Command Wants to Make Air Force Bombers Even More Lethal

    With planned cuts and retirements coming to the U.S. Air Force's bomber inventory, the head of Air Force Global Strike Command wants to make the remaining aircraft even more lethal in the future. The Air Force plans to have a total of 165 to 175 bombers in its inventory once the B-21 Long Range Strike Bomber comes online. Gen. Timothy Ray has advocated for a larger fleet -- roughly 220 -- but until the B-21 Raider enters service in the latter part of the 2020s or early 2030s, he wants to make sure the current bomber fleets have the capability to carry a bigger variety of loads.

  • Poll: Majority of Americans now disapprove of federal coronavirus efforts, Trump’s handling of crisis
    Politico

    Poll: Majority of Americans now disapprove of federal coronavirus efforts, Trump’s handling of crisis

    More than half of Americans now say the federal government has poorly managed the coronavirus' spread within the United States, according to a new survey, and a majority also disapprove of President Donald Trump's handling of the public health crisis. A CNN poll released Wednesday reports that 55 percent of respondents think the federal government has done a “poor job” of preventing the spread of Covid-19, the disease caused by the novel coronavirus, while 41 percent think it has done a “good job” working to thwart the disease's transmission. Four percent said they had no opinion.

  • China says new coronavirus cases lower, tightens land border containment
    Reuters

    China says new coronavirus cases lower, tightens land border containment

    China on Friday reported a fall in new coronavirus cases, particularly imported and asymptomatic infections which authorities fear could see a second wave of COVID-19 as city and travel restrictions are lifted. The National Health Commission said 42 new cases were reported in the mainland on Thursday, compared with 63 cases a day earlier, putting total infections at 81,907. The commission said 38 of the new patients were imported cases, down from 61 a day earlier, and there were 47 new asymptomatic cases compared with 61 a day earlier.

  • China's Wuhan couples were so eager to marry after lockdown ended that they crashed the marriage application system
    Business Insider

    China's Wuhan couples were so eager to marry after lockdown ended that they crashed the marriage application system

    The global epicenter of the coronavirus, the city of Wuhan in China, relaxed its 76-day lockdown on Wednesday. The day the lockdown ended, local couples flooded a local marriage-application app, causing it to crash. Wuhan, the Chinese city at the epicenter of the coronavirus pandemic, lifted its lockdown on Wednesday and couples living there rushed to take advantage.