US says Saudi prince approved Khashoggi murder but spares him sanctions

The release of a US intelligence report on the killing of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi is "an important step for accountability," says Sarah Leah Whitson, executive director of Democracy for the Arab World Now (DAWN), a group that was founded by Khashoggi. Dr. Kelly McFarland, director of programs and research at the Institute for the Study of Diplomacy at Georgetown University's Walsh School of Foreign Service in Washington DC, says the relationship between the United States and Saudi Arabia will likely go through "a rougher patch" over the next few years.

Video Transcript

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SARAH LEAH WHISTON: This is an important step for accountability, but really, it's just the beginning of what should follow.

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I don't think there's anyone who's been following the evidence in the story that has the slightest shred of doubt that the the orders were to kill Jamal Khashoggi.

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KELLY MCFARLAND: It's a signal to the Saudis that the US is going to be more strict, that it's not going to be sort of an open door for whatever the Saudis want to do, whether that's purchasing arms from the United States, waging war in Yemen, and obviously, especially not, you know, assassinating outspoken critics of the Kingdom's politics, wherever that may be in Turkey or anywhere else.

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