US vaping illnesses top 500, Missouri man is 8th death

Two-thirds of the illnesses reported involved 18- to 34-year-olds. Most are men.

  • Downtown D.C. burns after another night of protests and provocation near the White House
    Yahoo News

    Downtown D.C. burns after another night of protests and provocation near the White House

    The capital was awash with anger and pain as tear gas blew along the streets and rubber bullets flew Sunday night and into the early hours of Monday morning. Protesters clashed with law enforcement for the third straight evening outside the White House, and numerous businesses were vandalized by rioters defying a citywide curfew. Protesters gathered throughout Sunday in Lafayette Park, which is across the street from the White House and has been a focal point of the demonstrations that began here Friday evening.

  • New Yahoo News/YouGov poll: Most Americans say Trump is a 'racist' and want him to stop tweeting
    Yahoo News

    New Yahoo News/YouGov poll: Most Americans say Trump is a 'racist' and want him to stop tweeting

    The survey, conducted on May 29 and 30, found that 52 percent of Americans answered yes when asked whether they “think that President Trump is a racist.” Only 37 percent said no. Just 33 percent said the president should continue “posting messages on Twitter.”

  • Michael Flynn judge defends decision to challenge DOJ request to drop case; no 'rubber stamp'
    USA TODAY

    Michael Flynn judge defends decision to challenge DOJ request to drop case; no 'rubber stamp'

    The federal judge overseeing the fraught prosecution of former national security adviser Michael Flynn Monday defended his decision to review the Justice Department's effort to abandon the case, calling such a move "unprecedented." "It is unusual for a criminal defendant to claim innocence and move to withdraw his guilty plea after repeatedly swearing under oath that he committed the crime," attorneys for U.S. District Judge Emmet Sullivan said in documents filed in a D.C. appellate court. "It is unprecedented for an acting U.S. Attorney to contradict the solemn representations that career prosecutors made time and again, and undermine the district court's legal and factual findings, in moving on his own to dismiss the charge years after two different federal judges accepted the defendant's plea."

  • Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez accuses New York police union of threatening Mayor Bill de Blasio's daughter after her arrest at Saturday's protests
    Business Insider

    Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez accuses New York police union of threatening Mayor Bill de Blasio's daughter after her arrest at Saturday's protests

    REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, the New York progressive, slammed a New York City Police Department union for tweeting confidential information about Mayor Bill de Blasio's daughter's arrest on Saturday during a protest against racism. The Sergeants Benevolent Association tweeted a screenshot of Chiara de Blasio's arrest record and attacked the mayor over his daughter's participation in the protests. Ocasio-Cortez urged the NYPD to de-escalate with protesters rather than respond with violent force, and she told the union to "apologize and own this egregious behavior."

  • Minnesota National Guard Opened Fire on a Vehicle, Commander Says
    Military.com

    Minnesota National Guard Opened Fire on a Vehicle, Commander Says

    A soldier in Minneapolis opened fire on a speeding vehicle that posed a threat Sunday night -- the second known instance of a National Guard member discharging a weapon during the nationwide mass protests, the Minnesota National Guard commander said Monday. "Our soldier fired three rounds from his rifle in response to a direct threat" from a vehicle that drove at a position held by local law enforcement supported by the Guard, said Army Maj. Gen. Jon Jensen, adjutant general of the Minnesota National Guard. Read Next: Army Vet Lawmaker: Invoke Insurrection Act, Deploy Active-Duty Troops to Riots The driver ignored warnings to stop or turn away before the soldier opened fire, Jensen added.

  • Associated Press

    FAA chief called before Senate to testify about Boeing plane

    The nation's top aviation regulator is going back to Capitol Hill to explain the government's oversight of the Boeing 737 Max, which remains grounded after two deadly crashes. The Senate Commerce Committee said Tuesday that Federal Aviation Administration chief Stephen Dickson will appear before the panel June 17. Committee Chairman Roger Wicker, R-Ala., introduced legislation Tuesday that would direct the FAA to reconsider assumptions it makes about how quickly pilots respond to warning signs.

  • UK's Johnson offers visas for millions in Hong Kong
    AFP

    UK's Johnson offers visas for millions in Hong Kong

    British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said Tuesday he would offer millions of Hong Kongers visas and a possible route to UK citizenship if China persists with its national security law. "Many people in Hong Kong fear their way of life -- which China pledged to uphold -- is under threat," he wrote in an article for The Times newspaper and the South China Morning Post. "If China proceeds to justify their fears, then Britain could not in good conscience shrug our shoulders and walk away; instead we will honour our obligations and provide an alternative."

  • D.C. police officer to protesters: 'If I didn't think change was possible, I would just give up'
    Yahoo News Video

    D.C. police officer to protesters: 'If I didn't think change was possible, I would just give up'

    Hours into the mandatory curfew in Washington, D.C., several police officers were recorded engaging in peaceful dialogue with protesters. While remaining in opposition to the extended protests over George Floyd's death, one officer appeared to commiserate with protesters' desire to seek change.

  • In aftermath of George Floyd's death, San Diego police will 'immediately' end use of carotid restraint
    USA TODAY

    In aftermath of George Floyd's death, San Diego police will 'immediately' end use of carotid restraint

    The San Diego Police Department, spurred by the fallout from George Floyd's death in Minneapolis, has immediately banned a controversial restraint technique. At least three major police departments have banned similar neck holds or chokeholds amid increasing attention on policing maneuvers that cut off oxygen to persons under arrest or restraint. Former Minneapolis officer Derek Chauvin used a similarly controversial knee-to-neck restraint, pressing his knee into Floyd's neck for nearly nine minutes, resulting his death.

  • George Floyd: Anonymous hackers re-emerge amid US unrest
    BBC

    George Floyd: Anonymous hackers re-emerge amid US unrest

    As the United States deals with widespread civil unrest across dozens of cities, "hacktivist" group Anonymous has returned from the shadows. The hacker collective was once a regular fixture in the news, targeting those it accused of injustice with cyber-attacks. After years of relative quiet, it appears to have re-emerged in the wake of violent protests in Minneapolis over the death of George Floyd, promising to expose the "many crimes" of the city's police to the world.

  • Exclusive: Trump Administration Denied Iran Coronavirus Prisoner Swap
    The National Interest

    Exclusive: Trump Administration Denied Iran Coronavirus Prisoner Swap

    The Trump administration did not secure the freedom of an American imprisoned in Iran in exchange for releasing an Iranian scientist held on U.S. immigration charges, the National Interest has learned. Sirous Asgari was deported to Iran on Tuesday after nearly three years in U.S. detention, first for sanctions-busting charges that were later dropped, and then for an expired visa. Iranian officials had raised the possibility of trading Asgari for Michael White, a U.S. Navy veteran imprisoned since 2018.

  • Cop in Las Vegas critically wounded, others elsewhere injured in protests
    NBC News

    Cop in Las Vegas critically wounded, others elsewhere injured in protests

    A police officer in Las Vegas was critically wounded as others in New York and St. Louis were also injured during ongoing civil unrest sparked by last week's death of George Floyd in Minneapolis, officials said Tuesday. "This has been a long night for your police department ... and a tragic night for our community," Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department Sheriff Joseph Lombardo told reporters Tuesday. "With these protests, which are leading to riots, one tragedy is only leading to another."

  • The Trump administration was just hit with the first lawsuit challenging its executive order targeting social-media companies
    Business Insider

    The Trump administration was just hit with the first lawsuit challenging its executive order targeting social-media companies

    REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst A technology advocacy group filed the first lawsuit challenging President Trump's recent executive order targeting social-media companies. The lawsuit on Tuesday, filed by the Center for Democracy in Technology, argues that the order violates the First Amendment. Trump issued the executive order, which seeks to change a law protecting social-media companies, after Twitter flagged his tweets with a fact-check label.

  • UK's quarantine of travellers vital to avoid second coronavirus wave, ministers say
    Reuters

    UK's quarantine of travellers vital to avoid second coronavirus wave, ministers say

    Britain's quarantine for travellers arriving from abroad, which will be introduced from June 8, is crucial to avoiding a second wave of the coronavirus outbreak in the country, Interior Minister Priti Patel and Transport Minister Grant Shapps said. "From Monday, people arriving to the UK will need to self-isolate for 14 days", the ministers wrote in the Telegraph newspaper late on Tuesday. All international arrivals, including returning Britons, will have to self-isolate for 14 days and provide details of where they will be staying under the plans, which were criticised by airlines, business groups and politicians alike when they were announced.

  • Black Liberty U. alums rebuke Falwell after blackface tweet
    Associated Press

    Black Liberty U. alums rebuke Falwell after blackface tweet

    Nearly three dozen black alumni of Liberty University denounced school President Jerry Falwell Jr. on Monday, suggesting he step down after he mocked Virginia's mask-wearing requirement by invoking the blackface scandal that engulfed the state's governor last year. In a letter to Falwell, shared with The Associated Press, 35 faith leaders and former student-athletes told Falwell that his past comments “have repeatedly violated and misrepresented" Christian principles. “You have belittled staff, students and parents, you have defended inappropriate behaviors of politicians, encouraged violence, and disrespected people of other faiths,” they wrote, advising Falwell that “your heart is in politics more than Christian academia or ministry.”

  • Philippine exit from key US military pact 'suspended'
    AFP

    Philippine exit from key US military pact 'suspended'

    The Philippines has told the United States it is suspending its bid to break off a key military pact, the two allies said Tuesday in a sharp turnaround of President Rodrigo Duterte's foreign policy. Duterte in February gave notice to Washington he was axing the Visiting Forces Agreement (VFA) after accusing the US of interference in his internationally condemned narcotics crackdown. That began a 180-day countdown to ending the deal central to hundreds of joint military exercises with the US per year and a major component of their nearly 70-year-old alliance.

  • China's state media says US can now 'enjoy' protests after criticizing China's handling of unrest in Hong Kong
    Business Insider

    China's state media says US can now 'enjoy' protests after criticizing China's handling of unrest in Hong Kong

    China has been furious at the US government for criticizing its handling of protests in Hong Kong and for backing pro-democracy demonstrators. Over the weekend, state-run media made the most of the current protests in America, sparked by the police-related death of George Floyd. "US House Speaker Nancy Pelosi once called the violent protests in Hong Kong 'a beautiful sight to behold,'" he wrote.

  • Tear gas is banned from war — but police still shoot it at protesters, who cough and bleed as a result. At least one has lost an eye.
    INSIDER

    Tear gas is banned from war — but police still shoot it at protesters, who cough and bleed as a result. At least one has lost an eye.

    Jose Carlos Fajardo/Digital First Media/The Mercury News via Getty Images Police have fired tear gas into crowds of people protesting across the US this week, from Washington DC, to California, Minneapolis, and Illinois, as Americans speak out against the death of George Floyd. Human rights experts say the use of tear gas on civilians should be a weapon of last resort, not an everyday occurrence. Tear gas is especially dangerous for children, people with breathing issues, and the elderly.

  • Tom Cotton Floats Invoking the Insurrection Act to Quell Riots
    National Review

    Tom Cotton Floats Invoking the Insurrection Act to Quell Riots

    Senator Tom Cotton (R., Ark.) on Monday proposed invoking the Insurrection Act to quell the riots overtaking cities across the country. While use of the law is rare, then-president George H.W. Bush invoked the law in 1992 to send troops into Los Angeles during the Rodney King riots. “If local law enforcement is overwhelmed, if local politicians will not do their most basic job to protect our citizens, let's see how these anarchists respond when the 101st Airborne is on the other side of the street.”

  • 8 Minutes and 46 Seconds: How George Floyd Was Killed in Police Custody
    The New York Times

    8 Minutes and 46 Seconds: How George Floyd Was Killed in Police Custody

    On May 25, Minneapolis police officers arrested George Floyd, a 46-year-old black man, after a deli employee called 911, accusing him of buying cigarettes with a counterfeit $20 bill. Seventeen minutes after the first squad car arrived at the scene, Floyd was unconscious and pinned beneath three police officers, showing no signs of life. The day after Floyd's death, the Police Department fired all four of the officers involved in the episode, and on Friday the Hennepin County attorney, Mike Freeman, announced murder and manslaughter charges against Derek Chauvin, the officer who can be seen most clearly in witness videos pinning Floyd to the ground.

  • Phoenix's Jeri Williams is one of the nation's few black female police chiefs. She says George Floyd's death was 'disgustingly horrific.'
    USA TODAY

    Phoenix's Jeri Williams is one of the nation's few black female police chiefs. She says George Floyd's death was 'disgustingly horrific.'

    PHOENIX  Like many police chiefs across the country, Phoenix Chief Jeri Williams has denounced the death of George Floyd, the black man killed by a white police officer in Minneapolis, while at the same time she struggles to support her officers and maintain peace in the midst of the resulting protests. "The level of voice that we're seeing now is unlike anything that the world has ever seen, especially in the United States of America," Williams said.

  • Chechen leader accused of mass torture and murder offers Donald Trump human rights advice: ‘End the mayhem’
    The Independent

    Chechen leader accused of mass torture and murder offers Donald Trump human rights advice: ‘End the mayhem’

    Chechnya's gay-purging strongman Ramzan Kadyrov has made an unexpected foray into US politics by suggesting Donald Trump might have a thing or two to learn from him about human rights. In a social media post published early on Tuesday morning, the controversial leader demanded American authorities “put an end” to “mayhem” and “illegal actions against citizens.” “Police are lynching people right on the streets of American cities,” he wrote.

  • Feds Charge Two for Firebombing Minnesota Building During Protests
    The Daily Beast

    Feds Charge Two for Firebombing Minnesota Building During Protests

    The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms (ATF) made its first known intervention on Monday into the spiraling crisis in Minnesota, following the killing of George Floyd by Minneapolis Police Officer Derek Chauvin. The federal agency charged two men with firebombing a county building in the town of Apple Valley on Friday, and with possessing Molotov cocktails “not registered to them in the National Firearms Registration and Transfer.” The criminal complaint, brought against Garrett Ziegler and Fornandous Henderson, coincided with warnings from President Donald Trump and U.S. Attorney General William Barr of increased federal involvement in local law enforcement efforts to counter the violence that has wracked multiple American cities.

  • Pakistani girl dies of her injuries from Karachi plane crash
    Associated Press

    Pakistani girl dies of her injuries from Karachi plane crash

    A Pakistani girl who was critically injured on the ground last month when a passenger plane went down in a crowded neighborhood of the port city of Karachi has died at a hospital, her relatives and a doctor said Tuesday. Meanwhile, the plane's black box flight recorders were sent to France, where their data was downloaded Tuesday. The Airbus A320 crash killed 97 passengers and crew members; two passengers survived the crash.

  • Police in Naperville respond to reports of looting
    WLS – Chicago

    Police in Naperville respond to reports of looting

    Illinois Governor JB Pritzker has called in more reinforcement from the National Guard after protests in some Chicago suburbs devolved into violence and looting overnight.