Have vaccine, can travel (to Canada)

·6 min read

Canada opens its borders to vaccinated Americans. An accuser of New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo publicly speaks out. And the smoke is clearing over the Dixie Fire, but that could cause more trouble.

👋 Hey y'all! It's Laura here, with Monday's news, just for you.

But first, load up the moving truck! 🏡 Work remotely – and itching for a new city? A number of places are dangling up to $20,000 to lure remote workers and boost their economies. Here's where.

The Short List is a snappy USA TODAY news roundup. Subscribe to the newsletter here or text messages here.

Canada opens border to vaccinated Americans

American tourists can visit Canada for the first time since the pandemic. Canada flung open its borders to fully vaccinated U.S. citizens and permanent residents at 12:01 a.m. Monday. The moment couldn't arrive any sooner for loved ones who've been apart for more than a year. “We were all so eagerly waiting for that day,” Asawari Kaur of Indiana said while waiting in Detroit's duty-free shop minutes before midnight. To get into the country, travelers must test negative for the coronavirus and submit proof of vaccination and other travel details at least 72 hours before arriving, whether by land or air. The United States extended its closure to all Canadians making nonessential trips until at least Aug. 21. The same date applies to the Mexican border.

TTerri Mills and her dog, Carlos, walk past a line of vehicles waiting to enter Canada at the Peace Arch border crossing in Blaine, Wash., on Aug. 9. Mills, an American from Grizzly Flats, Calif., headed to visit her Canadian husband after Canada opened its border to nonessential travel.
TTerri Mills and her dog, Carlos, walk past a line of vehicles waiting to enter Canada at the Peace Arch border crossing in Blaine, Wash., on Aug. 9. Mills, an American from Grizzly Flats, Calif., headed to visit her Canadian husband after Canada opened its border to nonessential travel.

A stark warning on climate change

Hundreds of top scientists released a devastating report Monday on the danger that human-caused climate change poses to the world. Calling it "code red for humanity," the landmark report was released in Geneva by the United Nations' Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). Many of the changes seen in the world's climate are unprecedented in thousands, if not hundreds of thousands, of years, and some of the changes set in motion – such as a rise in sea levels – are irreversible over hundreds to thousands of years, according to the report. Wild weather events, such as storms and heat waves, are expected to worsen and become more frequent. The 3,000-page report says the evidence is clear that carbon dioxide is the main driver of climate change, even though other greenhouse gases and air pollutants play a role.

People and pets gather on the beach during a wildfire at Pefki village on Evia island, about 118 miles north of Athens, Greece, on Aug. 9. Firefighters and residents battled a massive forest fire on Greece's second-largest island, fighting to save what they could from flames that destroyed vast tracts of pristine forest, homes and businesses and sent thousands fleeing.
People and pets gather on the beach during a wildfire at Pefki village on Evia island, about 118 miles north of Athens, Greece, on Aug. 9. Firefighters and residents battled a massive forest fire on Greece's second-largest island, fighting to save what they could from flames that destroyed vast tracts of pristine forest, homes and businesses and sent thousands fleeing.

What everyone's talking about

Pediatric hospitals fill up as kids go back to school

Schools are filling up with kids going back to school – and pediatric hospitals are, too. Amid the latest surge in infections, this one driven by the highly contagious delta variant, children's hospitals in COVID-19 hot spots are seeing record numbers of pediatric patients. Schools are allowing students, with or without masks, back into the classroom. Some closed again shortly after they opened heir doors. The American Academy of Pediatrics sent a letter to acting FDA Commissioner Janet Woodcock last week, urging the agency to work aggressively toward authorizing vaccines for children under 12.

Students return from summer break Monday, July 26, 2021, at Southport Middle School in Indianapolis. Perry Township Schools have returned to full-time in-person learning. Mask-wearing is optional for students, regardless of COVID-19 vaccination status.
Students return from summer break Monday, July 26, 2021, at Southport Middle School in Indianapolis. Perry Township Schools have returned to full-time in-person learning. Mask-wearing is optional for students, regardless of COVID-19 vaccination status.

High winds, heat could spark even more wildfires

The smoke from the Dixie Fire is clearing – but that might not be a good thing. Scores of wildfires racing across much of the Northwest could be energized this week by a resurgence of high winds and heat, forecasters warned Monday. The historic Dixie Fire has destroyed at least 627 buildings and threatens thousands of others across four Northern California counties. AccuWeather said Seattle and Portland, Oregon, got a sprinkling of rain late last week after long dry spells, but hot, gusty and smoky conditions are on the way. The Dixie Fire grew to more than 750 square miles late Sunday and remained just 21% contained after scorching an area larger than Los Angeles. More than 100 major blazes are raging through 15 Western states.

A deer wanders in heavy smoke in front of a row of burned cars during the Dixie Fire in Greenville, Calif., on Aug. 6.
A deer wanders in heavy smoke in front of a row of burned cars during the Dixie Fire in Greenville, Calif., on Aug. 6.

Real quick

Cuomo accuser: 'He broke the law'

A former executive assistant who accused New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo of groping her at the Governor's Mansion last year said she believes the incident "was a crime. He broke the law." Brittany Commisso, listed as “Executive Assistant #1” in the state attorney's general investigation into alleged sexual harassment by Cuomo in the workplace, came forward in an interview Monday, saying the governor needs to be held accountable. Commisso is one of 11 women, nine of them state workers, who were interviewed in the report claiming Cuomo inappropriately touched them or made inappropriate comments. The report has led to calls for Cuomo to resign, including from President Joe Biden. Sunday night, Cuomo took another hit: His top aide, Melissa DeRosa, quit. The state Assembly's judiciary committee plans to meet Monday to discuss how to wrap up an investigation into whether there are grounds to impeach Cuomo. The governor has denied touching anyone appropriately.

Brittany Commisso, left, tells Jericka Duncan of "CBS This Morning" about how she was treated by Gov. Andrew Cuomo in an interview Aug. 8 in New York.
Brittany Commisso, left, tells Jericka Duncan of "CBS This Morning" about how she was treated by Gov. Andrew Cuomo in an interview Aug. 8 in New York.

A break from the news

This is a compilation of stories from across the USA TODAY Network. Want this news roundup in your inbox every night? Sign up for The Short List newsletter here.

This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: Canada's border, climate change, Dixie Fire, COVID-19 in kids, Gov. Andrew Cuomo. It's Monday's news.

Our goal is to create a safe and engaging place for users to connect over interests and passions. In order to improve our community experience, we are temporarily suspending article commenting