'It's like being on eBay': Cuomo talks state struggles to purchase ventilators

Gov. Andrew Cuomo said many states are forced to bid against each other to purchase ventilators amid the coronavirus pandemic.

  • A New York police officer drew his gun on protesters. Mayor Bill de Blasio says he 'should have his gun and badge taken away.'
    INSIDER

    A New York police officer drew his gun on protesters. Mayor Bill de Blasio says he 'should have his gun and badge taken away.'

    Seth Wenig/AP Photo A New York City police officer pointed his gun at peaceful protesters in Manhattan Sunday night. After a video of the incident trended on Twitter, Mayor Bill de Blasio said the officer's actions were "unacceptable" and he should "have his gun and badge taken away." On Saturday, de Blasio was widely criticized for defending police officers who drove into a protesting crowd, before backtracking on his comments Sunday.

  • Israeli forces shot and killed an autistic Palestinian man in Jerusalem as he walked to special needs school
    The Telegraph

    Israeli forces shot and killed an autistic Palestinian man in Jerusalem as he walked to special needs school

    Israeli forces shot and killed an unarmed autistic Palestinian man on his way to a special needs school in Jerusalem's Old City on Saturday, prompting comparisons to the police violence in the US and accusations of excessive force by Israeli forces. In a statement, Israeli police said they spotted a suspect “with a suspicious object that looked like a pistol” and opened fire on 32-year-old Iyad Halak, when he failed to stop. Israel's Channel 12 news station said members of the paramilitary border forces fired at Mr Halak's legs and chased him into an alley.

  • Joe Biden issues emotional plea calling for an end to riots: ‘We are a nation enraged’
    The Independent

    Joe Biden issues emotional plea calling for an end to riots: ‘We are a nation enraged’

    The former vice president, Joe Biden, has called for an end to the violent riots and looting, which were sparked by major demonstrations throughout the United States over the death of George Floyd, in an emotional new statement. In it, Mr Biden suggested he supported protests against the death of Mr Floyd, a 46-year-old unarmed black man who died after a white police officer in Minneapolis restrained him for more than eight minutes by kneeling on his neck as he pleaded for air, according to charging documents. “These last few days have laid bare that we are a nation furious at injustice,” Mr Biden began.

  • Amsterdam anti-racism rally criticised for lack of social distancing
    Reuters

    Amsterdam anti-racism rally criticised for lack of social distancing

    Amsterdam's mayor faced criticism from politicians and health experts on Tuesday after thousands of demonstrators packed the city centre for an anti-racism rally in violation of social distancing rules put in place to ward off the coronavirus. The protesters rallied in support of George Floyd, a black American who died in police custody in the United States last week, their number swelling from an expected 200-300 to several thousands on Monday. Amsterdam Mayor Femke Halsema, of the Green Left party, said city authorities were caught off guard by the huge turnout and could not have intervened peacefully.

  • India Has Lots of Nuclear Weapons
    The National Interest

    India Has Lots of Nuclear Weapons

    India is estimated to have produced enough military plutonium for 150 to 200 nuclear warheads, but has likely produced only 130 to 140,” according to Hans Kristensen and Matt Korda of the Nuclear Information Project at the Federation of American Scientists. Nonetheless, additional plutonium will be required to produce warheads for missiles now under development, and India is reportedly building several new plutonium production facilities. In addition, “India continues to modernize its nuclear arsenal, with at least five new weapon systems now under development to complement or replace existing nuclear-capable aircraft, land-based delivery systems, and sea-based systems.

  • Cities push back as airlines seek dozens of new service cuts. Is your airport on the list?
    USA TODAY

    Cities push back as airlines seek dozens of new service cuts. Is your airport on the list?

    As cities reopen and air travel gradually picks up, the government is on the cusp of giving final approval to a lengthy list of cities that could lose some of their airline service. Airports on the list that could temporarily lose an airline or certain flights range from those in large cities like Albuquerque, New Mexico, and New Orleans, to towns like Platinum, Alaska, and Ogdensburg, New York. Most, however, fall somewhere in the middle when it comes to size, whether it's Columbus, Ohio, or Sacramento, California.

  • China delayed releasing coronavirus info, frustrating WHO
    Associated Press

    China delayed releasing coronavirus info, frustrating WHO

    Chinese government labs only released the genome after another lab published it ahead of authorities on a virologist website on Jan. 11. Even then, China stalled for at least two weeks more on providing WHO with detailed data on patients and cases, according to recordings of internal meetings held by the U.N. health agency through January — all at a time when the outbreak arguably might have been dramatically slowed. WHO officials were lauding China in public because they wanted to coax more information out of the government, the recordings obtained by the AP suggest.

  • Sweden is rushing to launch a formal inquiry into its no-lockdown coronavirus strategy, as its death rate remains among the world's highest
    Business Insider

    Sweden is rushing to launch a formal inquiry into its no-lockdown coronavirus strategy, as its death rate remains among the world's highest

    HENRIK MONTGOMERY/TT News Agency/AFP via Getty Images Sweden is accelerating its review into the success of its coronavirus strategy, which controversially did not involve a lockdown and kept many businesses open. Prime Minister Stefan Löfven previously said Sweden would hold an inquiry after the outbreak, but told the Aftonbladet newspaper on Monday that a commission would be appointed sooner. Sweden is facing criticism as its death toll rises to one of the world's highest.

  • Wife of Derek Chauvin says in divorce filing she wants to change her name
    NBC News

    Wife of Derek Chauvin says in divorce filing she wants to change her name

    The estranged wife of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin intends to change her name and doesn't want any spousal support, her divorce petition revealed on Monday. Kellie May Chauvin, 45, filed for divorce on Saturday, a day after her 44-year-old husband of nearly 10 years, was arrested and charged with third-degree murder in the death of George Floyd, who died in police custody last week. The eight-page divorce petition, which was made public on Monday, revealed few details of the union, beyond basic language that "there has been an irretrievable breakdown of the marriage relationship of the parties within the definition of" Minnesota statutes.

  • The head of the Minneapolis police union called protests a 'terrorist movement' and blamed politicians for unrest in a leaked email
    INSIDER

    The head of the Minneapolis police union called protests a 'terrorist movement' and blamed politicians for unrest in a leaked email

    Tayfun Coskun/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images In a leaked email, the president of the Minneapolis Federation of Police said the ongoing protests over the death of George Floyd were a "terrorist movement" that has occurred following a "long time build up which dates back years." Lt. Bob Kroll blamed politicians for the ongoing tension, specifically targeting Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz and Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey. The former police chief of Minneapolis called on Kroll to resign, and Frey said Kroll was "shockingly indifferent to his role in undermining that trust and support" of the police force.

  • Trump: "I am your president of law and order"
    CBS News Videos

    Trump: "I am your president of law and order"

    President Trump spoke from the White House Rose Garden Monday evening after days of sometimes violent protests following the death of George Floyd. He said he supports peaceful protests but would mobilize federal resources, even the military if necessary, to stop "rioting and looting." Watch his remarks.

  • White supremacists attending George Floyd protests, Minnesota officials believe
    The Independent

    White supremacists attending George Floyd protests, Minnesota officials believe

    Officials in Minnesota believe that white supremacist “agitators” were inciting chaos at protests against police brutality and the killing of George Floyd. The Minnesota state corrections department said on Sunday that white supremacists were thought to be attending demonstrations in the Twin Cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul, and making chaos. “They're agitators,” said Department of Corrections Commissioner Paul Schnell on those who have caused destruction during demonstrations.

  • Hong Kong's Tiananmen commemoration banned by police for first time in three decades
    The Telegraph

    Hong Kong's Tiananmen commemoration banned by police for first time in three decades

    Hong Kong police on Monday banned an upcoming vigil marking the Tiananmen crackdown anniversary citing the coronavirus pandemic, the first time the gathering has been halted in three decades. The candlelight June 4 vigil usually attracts huge crowds and is the only place on Chinese soil where such a major commemoration of the anniversary is still allowed. Last year's gathering was especially large and came just a week before seven months of pro-democracy protests and clashes exploded onto the city's streets, sparked initially by a plan to allow extraditions to the authoritarian mainland.

  • Cops Beaten, Shot, Rammed by SUVs as George Floyd Protests Boil Over
    The Daily Beast

    Cops Beaten, Shot, Rammed by SUVs as George Floyd Protests Boil Over

    Violent factions attacked police officers across the U.S. over the last 24 hours as demonstrations against the death of an unarmed black man in police custody have spiraled out of control. George Floyd, 46, died after former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin was caught on video kneeling on his neck for nearly nine minutes while he was handcuffed on Memorial Day. County Sheriff Joe Lombardo told the Las Vegas Review Journal that the officer survived.

  • Brazil's Supreme Court judge shelves request to seize Bolsonaro's cellphone
    Reuters

    Brazil's Supreme Court judge shelves request to seize Bolsonaro's cellphone

    Brazil's Supreme Court Judge Celso de Mello shelved on Monday night a request made by political parties to seize President Jair Bolsonaro's cellphone as part of an investigation on whether or not he tried to meddle with law enforcement for personal reasons. De Mello agreed with a statement made by the government's Attorney General Augusto Aras that it is up to public prosecutors to request due diligence within a probe, adding that political parties have no legitimacy to do so. But the Supreme Court judge criticized Bolsonaro's recent remarks that he would not comply with an possible court order determining the seizure of his cellphone.

  • Cuomo Cooks Coronavirus Numbers to Defend Controversial Nursing Home Policy
    The National Interest

    Cuomo Cooks Coronavirus Numbers to Defend Controversial Nursing Home Policy

    Democratic New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo touted misleading statistics on nursing home deaths Wednesday to defend his approach to nursing homes during the coronavirus pandemic. Cuomo has faced criticism for a March 25 order requiring nursing homes and other adult care facilities to accept recovering coronavirus patients — an order that the governor took six weeks to undo. “In general, you look at how New York did, we're in Washington, you look how New York did on nursing homes vis-a-vis the nation, we did better than 33 States in the nation, per capita on nursing homes,” Cuomo asserted at Wednesday's press conference.

  • The coronavirus is disappearing in Italy, according to Italian doctors
    Business Insider

    The coronavirus is disappearing in Italy, according to Italian doctors

    PIERO CRUCIATTI/AFP via Getty Images Italy has been one of the worst-affected countries in the global coronavirus pandemic. However, the COVID-19 virus is now disappearing in the country according to Italian doctors Alberto Zangrillo, who heads a hospital in Milan, said that "in reality, the virus clinically no longer exists in Italy." A leading doctor in Genoa said that "the strength the virus had two months ago is not the same strength it has today."

  • Ohio woman still missing months after mysterious disappearance from grandparents' house on Christmas Day
    NBC News

    Ohio woman still missing months after mysterious disappearance from grandparents' house on Christmas Day

    Five months have passed since Parris Hopson left her grandparents' house in Massillon, Ohio on Christmas Day in 2019 to go for a walk. “I just don't want to lose hope,” Rochelle said. Parris, who lives in Columbus, Ohio, with her mother, walked away from the Christmas Day family gathering at her grandparents' house on Shriver Avenue in Massillon.

  • Iran says scientist jailed in US flying home
    AFP

    Iran says scientist jailed in US flying home

    Iranian scientist Sirous Asgari has flown out of the United States after being released from prison and will return to the Islamic republic on Wednesday, the foreign ministry said. A US court had in November cleared Asgari of charges of stealing trade secrets in 2016 while he was on an academic visit to Ohio from Tehran's Sharif University of Technology. The 59-year-old told British newspaper The Guardian in March that the Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agency was holding him at a Louisiana detention centre without basic sanitation and refusing to let him return to Iran despite his exoneration.

  • G7 leaders reject Russia's return after Trump summit invite
    BBC

    G7 leaders reject Russia's return after Trump summit invite

    The UK and Canada have opposed Russia's return to the G7, deepening a rift over US President Donald Trump's wish for the country to rejoin. Mr Trump said on Saturday he would postpone the G7 summit scheduled to take place this month until September. The president said the G7's "outdated group of countries" should be expanded to include others, including Russia.

  • A black congresswoman was pepper-sprayed by police while marching with George Floyd protesters in Ohio
    INSIDER

    A black congresswoman was pepper-sprayed by police while marching with George Floyd protesters in Ohio

    Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images Congresswoman Joyce Beatty represents Ohio's 3rd Congressional District in the House of Representatives. While marching in a protest regarding the death of George Floyd, Beatty, who is black, tried to deescalate a confrontation between protesters and police and was hit with pepper spray. "While it was peaceful, there were times when people got off the curb, into the streets, but too much force is not the answer to this," Beatty said.

  • Black Liberty U. alums rebuke Falwell after blackface tweet
    Associated Press

    Black Liberty U. alums rebuke Falwell after blackface tweet

    Nearly three dozen black alumni of Liberty University denounced school President Jerry Falwell Jr. on Monday, suggesting he step down after he mocked Virginia's mask-wearing requirement by invoking the blackface scandal that engulfed the state's governor last year. In a letter to Falwell, shared with The Associated Press, 35 faith leaders and former student-athletes told Falwell that his past comments “have repeatedly violated and misrepresented" Christian principles. “You have belittled staff, students and parents, you have defended inappropriate behaviors of politicians, encouraged violence, and disrespected people of other faiths,” they wrote, advising Falwell that “your heart is in politics more than Christian academia or ministry.”

  • One officer at George Floyd's fatal arrest spotlights another racial divide
    NBC News

    One officer at George Floyd's fatal arrest spotlights another racial divide

    The image of then-Minneapolis police Officer Tou Thao, a Hmong American, standing with his back turned as a white officer knelt on George Floyd's neck has ignited a discussion about how to approach the topic of anti-blackness in the Asian American community. Thao, who has a history of being involved in use-of-force incidents, is being described by activists as a symbol of Asian American complicity in anti-blackness following the death of Floyd, a black man who begged for his life while then-Officer Derek Chauvin dug his knee into his neck for more than eight minutes. Several experts expressed that this is a pivotal moment for Asian Americans to tackle the subject of anti-blackness in a productive way, beginning with unpacking the biases in their own communities by first confronting the historical context behind it.

  • Special Report: U.S. school closures dramatically shrinking public education, Reuters finds
    Reuters

    Special Report: U.S. school closures dramatically shrinking public education, Reuters finds

    Panditaratne is left to download her daughter's special education material and sit with her as she does her school work—in between her own calls as a maritime lawyer in South Florida. More than two months after schools across the United States began closing in an effort to slow the spread of the coronavirus, the shutdown is taking a profound toll on the nation's system of education, Reuters found by surveying nearly 60 school districts serving some 2.8 million students. Almost overnight, public education in the United States has shrunk to a shell of its former self, the review found, with teacher instruction, grading, attendance, special education and meal services for hungry children slashed back or gutted altogether.

  • Cuomo: "Don't snatch defeat from the jaws of victory" in virus fight
    CBS News

    Cuomo: "Don't snatch defeat from the jaws of victory" in virus fight

    Governor Andrew Cuomo on Monday warned New Yorkers gathering in ongoing protests that "we don't know the consequences of the COVID virus in mass gatherings." As parts of the state continue to move ahead with reopening and New York City set to reopen on June 8, Cuomo said "don't snatch defeat from the jaws of victory." "It took us 93 days to get here," Cuomo said.