Defense lawyer: Biker at fault for fatal crash that killed 7

A defense lawyer said in a document made public on Tuesday that a motorcyclist was at fault for a crash that killed him and six of his fellow bikers on a New Hampshire highway in June of last year.

  • Downtown D.C. burns after another night of protests and provocation near the White House
    Yahoo News

    Downtown D.C. burns after another night of protests and provocation near the White House

    The capital was awash with anger and pain as tear gas blew along the streets and rubber bullets flew Sunday night and into the early hours of Monday morning. Protesters clashed with law enforcement for the third straight evening outside the White House, and numerous businesses were vandalized by rioters defying a citywide curfew. Protesters gathered throughout Sunday in Lafayette Park, which is across the street from the White House and has been a focal point of the demonstrations that began here Friday evening.

  • Leaked documents reveal China withheld crucial information about the coronavirus at the start of the outbreak
    Business Insider

    Leaked documents reveal China withheld crucial information about the coronavirus at the start of the outbreak

    Xinhua via REUTERS China delayed the release of information about the coronavirus, according to a new investigation. Its health officials did not share the coronavirus genome until over a week after scientists in Chinese laboratories decoded it at the beginning of January. Beijing did not warn the World Health Organization that the virus passed between people until two weeks later.

  • Judge: Justice Department reversal in Flynn case 'unusual'
    Associated Press

    Judge: Justice Department reversal in Flynn case 'unusual'

    A federal judge on Monday defended his decision not to quickly approve the Justice Department's request to dismiss its own criminal case against former Trump administration national security adviser Michael Flynn, saying that the department's reversal was unusual and he wanted to consider the request carefully before ruling on it. The brief from U.S. District Judge Emmet Sullivan offers the most detailed explanation for his refusal to immediately sign off on the department's decision to drop its case against Flynn, who pleaded guilty as part of special counsel Robert Mueller's Russia investigation. It raises the prospect of a drawn-out clash between two branches of government over whether a judge can be forced to unwind a guilty plea at the Justice Department's behest.

  • A New York police officer drew his gun on protesters. Mayor Bill de Blasio says he 'should have his gun and badge taken away.'
    INSIDER

    A New York police officer drew his gun on protesters. Mayor Bill de Blasio says he 'should have his gun and badge taken away.'

    Seth Wenig/AP Photo A New York City police officer pointed his gun at peaceful protesters in Manhattan Sunday night. After a video of the incident trended on Twitter, Mayor Bill de Blasio said the officer's actions were "unacceptable" and he should "have his gun and badge taken away." On Saturday, de Blasio was widely criticized for defending police officers who drove into a protesting crowd, before backtracking on his comments Sunday.

  • Amsterdam anti-racism rally criticised for lack of social distancing
    Reuters

    Amsterdam anti-racism rally criticised for lack of social distancing

    Amsterdam's mayor faced criticism from politicians and health experts on Tuesday after thousands of demonstrators packed the city centre for an anti-racism rally in violation of social distancing rules put in place to ward off the coronavirus. The protesters rallied in support of George Floyd, a black American who died in police custody in the United States last week, their number swelling from an expected 200-300 to several thousands on Monday. Amsterdam Mayor Femke Halsema, of the Green Left party, said city authorities were caught off guard by the huge turnout and could not have intervened peacefully.

  • India Has Lots of Nuclear Weapons
    The National Interest

    India Has Lots of Nuclear Weapons

    India is estimated to have produced enough military plutonium for 150 to 200 nuclear warheads, but has likely produced only 130 to 140,” according to Hans Kristensen and Matt Korda of the Nuclear Information Project at the Federation of American Scientists. Nonetheless, additional plutonium will be required to produce warheads for missiles now under development, and India is reportedly building several new plutonium production facilities. In addition, “India continues to modernize its nuclear arsenal, with at least five new weapon systems now under development to complement or replace existing nuclear-capable aircraft, land-based delivery systems, and sea-based systems.

  • Biden: ‘I know I’ve made mistakes’
    Yahoo News Video

    Biden: ‘I know I’ve made mistakes’

    Former Vice President Joe Biden on Monday attended a campaign event in Delaware and addressed criticism by saying, “I know I've made mistakes.

  • Cities push back as airlines seek dozens of new service cuts. Is your airport on the list?
    USA TODAY

    Cities push back as airlines seek dozens of new service cuts. Is your airport on the list?

    As cities reopen and air travel gradually picks up, the government is on the cusp of giving final approval to a lengthy list of cities that could lose some of their airline service. Airports on the list that could temporarily lose an airline or certain flights range from those in large cities like Albuquerque, New Mexico, and New Orleans, to towns like Platinum, Alaska, and Ogdensburg, New York. Most, however, fall somewhere in the middle when it comes to size, whether it's Columbus, Ohio, or Sacramento, California.

  • Cuomo: "Don't snatch defeat from the jaws of victory" in virus fight
    CBS News

    Cuomo: "Don't snatch defeat from the jaws of victory" in virus fight

    Governor Andrew Cuomo on Monday warned New Yorkers gathering in ongoing protests that "we don't know the consequences of the COVID virus in mass gatherings." As parts of the state continue to move ahead with reopening and New York City set to reopen on June 8, Cuomo said "don't snatch defeat from the jaws of victory." "It took us 93 days to get here," Cuomo said.

  • Obama to George Floyd protesters: Channel 'justifiable anger' into action
    Yahoo News

    Obama to George Floyd protesters: Channel 'justifiable anger' into action

    Former President Barack Obama on Monday addressed the nationwide protests over the death of George Floyd, praising the “overwhelming majority” of peaceful demonstrators, condemning the violence brought on by a “small minority” and calling on a “new generation of activists” to “bring about real change.” “The waves of protests across the country represent a genuine and legitimate frustration over a decades-long failure to reform police practices and the broader criminal justice system in the United States,” Obama wrote in an essay published on Medium.com. The former president then lauded police in Camden, N.J., and Flint, Mich., for publicly supporting peaceful protests before he criticized demonstrators who have been acting violently.

  • 'The Bible is not a prop': Religious leaders, lawmakers outraged over Trump church visit
    NBC News

    'The Bible is not a prop': Religious leaders, lawmakers outraged over Trump church visit

    Lawmakers and religious leaders — including the bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Washington — voiced outrage after police used tear gas against peaceful protesters outside the White House before President Donald Trump's photo-op at nearby St. John's Episcopal Church on Monday evening. The Rev. Mariann Budde, bishop of the Washington diocese, said Tuesday that Trump held up the Bible in front of St. John's "as if it were a prop or an extension of his military and authoritarian position." Budde, in an interview with Craig Melvin on NBC's "TODAY" show, said that what Trump did in front of the church she oversees "was an abuse of the spiritual tools and symbols of our traditions and of our sacred space."

  • Minneapolis police chief filed a civil suit against the department in 2007 alleging discrimination against people of color, including black officers
    INSIDER

    Minneapolis police chief filed a civil suit against the department in 2007 alleging discrimination against people of color, including black officers

    The Minneapolis Police Department Chief filed a civil suit against the department alleging discrimination against people of color including black officers in 2007, CNN reported. Excessive force complaints against Minneapolis officers were common, specifically from African-American residents, The New York Times reported. Derek Chauvin, the ex-police officer charged with third-degree murder and manslaughter tied to George Floyd's death had 18 complaints against him prior to the incident.

  • Hong Kong's Tiananmen commemoration banned by police for first time in three decades
    The Telegraph

    Hong Kong's Tiananmen commemoration banned by police for first time in three decades

    Hong Kong police on Monday banned an upcoming vigil marking the Tiananmen crackdown anniversary citing the coronavirus pandemic, the first time the gathering has been halted in three decades. The candlelight June 4 vigil usually attracts huge crowds and is the only place on Chinese soil where such a major commemoration of the anniversary is still allowed. Last year's gathering was especially large and came just a week before seven months of pro-democracy protests and clashes exploded onto the city's streets, sparked initially by a plan to allow extraditions to the authoritarian mainland.

  • Exclusive: U.S. small business program handed out virus aid to many borrowers twice
    Reuters

    Exclusive: U.S. small business program handed out virus aid to many borrowers twice

    A technical snafu in a U.S. government system caused many small businesses to receive loans twice or more under a federal aid program to help businesses hurt by the COVID-19 pandemic, nearly a dozen people with knowledge of the matter said. The money mistakenly handed out could amount to hundreds of millions of dollars that the government and lenders - which made the loans - have been trying to identify and recover in recent weeks, one of the people briefed on the matter said. The technical issue and scale of the resulting duplicate deposits made under the Small Business Administration's $660 billion Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) have not been previously reported.

  • Police disperse anti-Bolsonaro protesters in Brazil
    Associated Press

    Police disperse anti-Bolsonaro protesters in Brazil

    Police say they used tear gas to disperse hundreds of demonstrators in Brazil's largest city on Sunday as groups protesting and supporting President Jair Bolsonaro neared a clash. The demonstration by several hundred black-clad members of football fan groups in Sao Paulo appeared to be the largest anti-Bolsonaro street march in months in a country that has become an epicenter of the spreading COVID-19 pandemic. Many of the protesters chanted “Democracy!” as they marched.

  • Biden Proposes Training Cops to Shoot Attackers in the Leg to Reduce Fatalities
    National Review

    Biden Proposes Training Cops to Shoot Attackers in the Leg to Reduce Fatalities

    Joe Biden on Monday suggested that police forces could train officers to shoot attackers in the legs in order to reduce potential fatalities. There is “the idea that instead of standing there and teaching a cop when there's an unarmed person, coming at him with a knife or something, to shoot him in the leg instead of in the heart,” Biden said. Biden made his remarks while meeting with African American community leaders at the Bethel AME Church in Wilmington, Del. The former vice president was discussing the widespread protests touched off by the killing of George Floyd, an African American man, at the hands of white police officers in Minneapolis, Minn.

  • New York mayor Bill de Blasio defends daughter after protest arrest
    NBC News

    New York mayor Bill de Blasio defends daughter after protest arrest

    New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio defended his daughter on Monday following her arrest during weekend protests and insisted she didn't "commit any violence." Chiara de Blasio, 25, was taken into custody late Saturday night at East 12th Street and Broadway in Manhattan for alleged unlawful assembly during protests against police brutality. De Blasio said he didn't know his own daughter got arrested until a reporter called City Hall.

  • George Floyd was killed in a homicide caused by asphyxia due to neck and back compression, an independent autopsy found
    INSIDER

    George Floyd was killed in a homicide caused by asphyxia due to neck and back compression, an independent autopsy found

    George Floyd died on May 25 of asphyxia due to compression of the neck and back, an independent autopsy found. A video that has sparked outrage across the nation showed a white Minneapolis police officer pinning the handcuffed 46-year-old black man's neck on the ground beneath his knee. The way he was restrained restricted not only "blood flow into his brain, but also airflow into his lungs," said Antonio Romanucci, an attorney working with the Floyd family.

  • In a new post, former President Barack Obama says 'the choice isn't between protest and politics. We have to do both'
    Business Insider

    In a new post, former President Barack Obama says 'the choice isn't between protest and politics. We have to do both'

    Former President Barack Obama posted a blog post on Medium on Monday morning, offering suggestions and ideas for achieving "real change" stemming from the George Floyd protests. "Ultimately, it's going to be up to a new generation of activists to shape strategies that best fit the times," Obama wrote. "But eventually, aspirations have to be translated into specific laws and institutional practices — and in a democracy, that only happens when we elect government officials who are responsive to our demands," Obama said.

  • ‘Wanton thuggery’: Australian reporter knocked down by police live on air as she covered George Floyd protests in DC
    The Independent

    ‘Wanton thuggery’: Australian reporter knocked down by police live on air as she covered George Floyd protests in DC

    US riot police were broadcast live on air using aggressive force to push and knock down an Australian reporter and her cameraman as they covered the Black Lives Matter protests in Washington DC, prompting an investigation by the Australian embassy. Amelia Brace, a reporter for Australian television network Channel 7, was broadcasting from the White House with cameraman Timothy Myers when police plouged into the crowd with riot shields, firing rubber bullets and tear gas to disperse them. Footage of the police barrelling at the camera and shoving the news team was viewed over a million times in a matter of hours.

  • Brit Hume: President Trump has aligned himself with those who feel the restoration of law and order is job one
    FOX News Videos

    Brit Hume: President Trump has aligned himself with those who feel the restoration of law and order is job one

    Fox News senior political analyst Brit Hume joins Bret Baier on 'Special Report.

  • Cops Beaten, Shot, Rammed by SUVs as George Floyd Protests Boil Over
    The Daily Beast

    Cops Beaten, Shot, Rammed by SUVs as George Floyd Protests Boil Over

    Violent factions attacked police officers across the U.S. over the last 24 hours as demonstrations against the death of an unarmed black man in police custody have spiraled out of control. George Floyd, 46, died after former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin was caught on video kneeling on his neck for nearly nine minutes while he was handcuffed on Memorial Day. County Sheriff Joe Lombardo told the Las Vegas Review Journal that the officer survived.

  • Pompeo says U.S. considers welcoming Hong Kong people, entrepreneurs
    Reuters

    Pompeo says U.S. considers welcoming Hong Kong people, entrepreneurs

    The United States is considering the option of welcoming people from Hong Kong in response to China's push to impose national security legislation in the former British colony, U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said in remarks released on Monday. Influential Republican Senate leader Mitch McConnell also said on Monday he hoped the Trump administration would soon identify specific ways to "impose costs on Beijing" for curbing freedoms in Hong Kong. McConnell said the United States should mirror the response of other democracies and open its doors to people from the territory.

  • 8 Minutes and 46 Seconds: How George Floyd Was Killed in Police Custody
    The New York Times

    8 Minutes and 46 Seconds: How George Floyd Was Killed in Police Custody

    On May 25, Minneapolis police officers arrested George Floyd, a 46-year-old black man, after a deli employee called 911, accusing him of buying cigarettes with a counterfeit $20 bill. Seventeen minutes after the first squad car arrived at the scene, Floyd was unconscious and pinned beneath three police officers, showing no signs of life. The day after Floyd's death, the Police Department fired all four of the officers involved in the episode, and on Friday the Hennepin County attorney, Mike Freeman, announced murder and manslaughter charges against Derek Chauvin, the officer who can be seen most clearly in witness videos pinning Floyd to the ground.

  • Deadlock as Qatar embargo marks three-year anniversary
    AFP

    Deadlock as Qatar embargo marks three-year anniversary

    In June 2017, Saudi Arabia led its Gulf allies the United Arab Emirates and Bahrain, along with Egypt, to cut all ties with Qatar, accusing it of backing radical Islamist movements and Iran -- a charge denied by Doha. On May 24, 2017, a statement attributed to Qatar's ruler appears on the state news agency's website, apparently endorsing Islamist movements and criticising US President Donald Trump. Qatar says the site has been hacked and that the statement is fake, but it is picked up and published in regional media.