Florida 'red flag' law removes hundreds of guns

A 23-year-old man who posted on Facebook, “I don't know why I don't go on a killing spree." A West Palm Beach couple who shot up their home while high on cocaine. A 31-year-old Gulf Coast man who pointed a semiautomatic rifle at a motorcyclist. All four Florida residents had their guns taken away by judges under a “red flag” law the state passed three weeks after a mentally disturbed gunman killed 17 people at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland two years ago Friday.

  • Twitter flags Trump tweet on Minneapolis protests for 'glorifying violence'
    Yahoo News

    Twitter flags Trump tweet on Minneapolis protests for 'glorifying violence'

    For the second time, Twitter flagged a message from President Trump with a warning, saying that his post-midnight tweet calling for the military to shoot protesters in Minneapolis was “glorifying violence. As protests over the death of George Floyd escalated to the burning of a police station Thursday, Trump took to Twitter after midnight to write, “I can't stand back & watch this happen to a great American City, Minneapolis. A total lack of leadership.

  • Can you contract coronavirus from a surface or object? 
    Yahoo News

    Can you contract coronavirus from a surface or object? 

    While the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says contaminated surfaces are not the main way the virus is transmitted, the agency hasn't ruled surfaces out as a possible mode of infection. “If you want a reliable way to prevent yourself from getting the coronavirus, worry less about the surfaces you touch, and worry more about how frequently you wash your hands,” says Dr. Dara Kass, a Yahoo News Medical Contributor and associate professor of emergency medicine at Columbia University Medical Center. Confusion over how the virus is transmitted was reignited last week when the CDC edited the “How COVID-19 Spreads” page on their COVID-19 website to mention contaminated surfaces and objects under a new heading entitled, “The virus does not spread easily in other ways.”

  • Caution on China from EU, West's 'soft underbelly'
    AFP

    Caution on China from EU, West's 'soft underbelly'

    The European Union's cautious response to China's clampdown on Hong Kong on Friday will not much trouble Beijing and underscores Brussels' dilemma when dealing with the increasingly confident great power. After a video conference with 27 foreign ministers, EU foreign policy chief Josep Borrell expressed "grave concern" but he could threaten no sanctions and said planning for an EU-China summit would continue. In fact, Borrell said, only one of the European countries even raised the possibly of sanctions -- a diplomatic source told AFP this was Sweden -- and he said European investment in China was not in question.

  • Long Island serial killer victim IDed 2 decades later
    Associated Press

    Long Island serial killer victim IDed 2 decades later

    A woman whose skeletal remains were found along a suburban New York beach highway, in an area where body parts of 10 other people had been strewn, was identified as a Philadelphia escort who went missing two decades ago, police said Thursday. Suffolk County police said the woman previously known as “Jane Doe No. 6” was identified through genetic genealogy technology as Valerie Mack, who also went by Melissa Taylor and was last seen in 2000 near Atlantic City, New Jersey. Determining the victim's identity has brought clarity to a long-running Long Island mystery that attracted national headlines, was featured on true-crime TV shows and was the subject of a recent Netflix film, Police Commissioner Geraldine Hart said.

  • Police officers around the country sound off on Minneapolis policing that led to George Floyd death
    Yahoo News Video

    Police officers around the country sound off on Minneapolis policing that led to George Floyd death

    Law enforcement officials around the country are publicly condemning the killing of George Floyd, an unarmed black man who was seen on video gasping for breath as a white officer held him down with a knee on his neck for close to eight minutes.

  • Republican lawmakers accused of hiding positive COVID-19 test result from Democrats, who call it 'immoral'
    Yahoo News

    Republican lawmakers accused of hiding positive COVID-19 test result from Democrats, who call it 'immoral'

    Democratic lawmakers in the Pennsylvania House of Representatives are demanding answers after learning that one of their Republican colleagues tested positive for COVID-19, shared that information with GOP leadership, but never informed them. On May 20, Republican Rep. Andrew Lewis learned he had tested positive for COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus. Two other Republican House members who came in contact with Lewis were told to self-quarantine for 14 days, but Democratic lawmakers, some of whom also had contact with Lewis or with the two other Republicans before May 20, say they first learned of the positive test result on Wednesday.

  • Minnesota Riots Hurt Klobuchar’s VP Nomination Prospects, According to Biden Ally
    National Review

    Minnesota Riots Hurt Klobuchar’s VP Nomination Prospects, According to Biden Ally

    The ongoing riots in Minnesota hurt Senator Amy Klobuchar's prospects for Democratic nomination as vice president, House Majority Whip James Clyburn (D., S.C.) said on Friday. Klobuchar declined to bring charges against multiple Minneapolis police officers involved in shootings over the course of her seven-year tenure as attorney for Hennepin County. Minneapolis has seen four days of riots after resident George Floyd, an African-American man, died following his arrest at the hands of white officers.

  • Reuters

    Attack in northern Burkina Faso kills at least 15

    At least 15 people were killed following an attack on a convoy transporting traders in a town in northern Burkina Faso on Friday, the government said on Saturday. Many more were still unaccounted for, the government said in a statement. Burkina Faso has been battling armed combatants with links to al Qaeda and the Islamic State since 2017.

  • Cemeteries braced for surge in Covid-19 dead as Mexico readies to reopen
    The Guardian

    Cemeteries braced for surge in Covid-19 dead as Mexico readies to reopen

    Yet as Mexico's daily death toll rises to become one of the highest in the world – a record 501 fatalities were reported on Tuesday alone – the country is simultaneously preparing to reopen and weathering a politically charged battle over the true scale of the crisis. We're doing well, the pandemic has been tamed,” Mexico's populist president, Andrés Manuel López Obrador, claimed on Thursday as he announced he would resume touring the country when a period of nationwide quarantine was wound down next week. Alejandro Macías, a leading infectious diseases specialist, said he understood and supported the need to plot out a return to some kind of normality for Mexico's 129 million citizens.

  • White House encourages hydroxychloroquine use for coronavirus again
    Yahoo News

    White House encourages hydroxychloroquine use for coronavirus again

    The White House continued on Thursday to promote the use of hydroxychloroquine, the antimalarial drug that President Trump and some of his supporters have held out as a treatment for the coronavirus, against the advice of the Food and Drug Administration and in the face of studies that have shown it can be harmful in some cases. Routinely touted by prominent conservative allies of the president, including primetime Fox News anchor Laura Ingraham, it has been denounced by members of the medical establishment as an unproven therapy that poses the risk of potentially fatal heart complications. The FDA recommends that COVID-19 patients, if they choose to use it, do so only in a hospital or under medical supervision in a clinical trial.

  • ‘If you can say you can’t breathe, you’re breathing’: Mississippi mayor faces backlash over George Floyd comments
    The Independent

    ‘If you can say you can’t breathe, you’re breathing’: Mississippi mayor faces backlash over George Floyd comments

    A mayor in Mississippi is facing fierce backlash and calls to resign after saying that he “didn't see anything unreasonable” about the death of George Floyd. Mr Floyd, who was black, died while in police custody in Minneapolis after a white officer was filmed pinned him to the ground by his neck for a prolonged period of time. In the footage, Floyd can be heard saying “I can't breathe” to officers multiple times.

  • Israel police kill Palestinian they mistakenly thought was armed
    AFP

    Israel police kill Palestinian they mistakenly thought was armed

    Israeli police in annexed east Jerusalem on Saturday shot dead a disabled Palestinian they mistakenly thought was armed with a pistol, prompting furious condemnation from the Palestinians. The incident happened in the alleys of the walled Old City near Lions' Gate, an access point mainly used by Palestinians. "Police units on patrol there spotted a suspect with a suspicious object that looked like a pistol," an Israeli police statement said.

  • Well-preserved Roman mosaic unearthed in Italian vineyard
    Associated Press

    Well-preserved Roman mosaic unearthed in Italian vineyard

    Archaeologists have briefly revealed a well-preserved mosaic floor of an ancient Roman villa first discovered almost a century ago near the northern Italian city of Verona. The mosaic in bright shades of red, pink, orange, purple and yellow appeared to be ''in a good state of conservation,'' from what archaeologists observed after gingerly digging a trench between vineyards in the hills of Valpolicella, Gianni de Zuccato, the official in charge of archaeology in Verona province, said Friday. Mosaics revealing the site of an ancient villa were first discovered in 1922.

  • IKEA manager in Poland charged for firing worker over anti-gay comments
    NBC News

    IKEA manager in Poland charged for firing worker over anti-gay comments

    A Polish prosecutor has charged an IKEA manager with religious discrimination for firing an employee who called homosexuality "an abomination" on the company's internal website. The employee at IKEA's Krakow store was fired last year after quoting passages from the Bible referring to homosexuality on the company's intranet and refusing to remove his comments, a spokesman for the Warsaw prosecutor's office said. "As an employer, we will provide all the help and support to our charged employee," said a spokeswoman from Ingka Group, which owns most IKEA stores including those in Poland.

  • Defense secretary says coronavirus vaccine will be available within months, but experts skeptical
    Yahoo News

    Defense secretary says coronavirus vaccine will be available within months, but experts skeptical

    Pentagon leaders expressed strong confidence Thursday that a coronavirus vaccine will be available by January, and perhaps as early as this fall — claims that were met with skepticism by scientific experts. Defense Secretary Mark Esper said that he and Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar “will be co-chairing Operation Warp Speed,” the effort by the administration of President Trump to produce 300 million vaccine doses by January. “I'm confident that we will be able to deliver a vaccine at scale in time” by partnering with other government agencies and the private sector, Esper said.

  • Revealed: the worrying links between Huawei, our universities and China
    The Telegraph

    Revealed: the worrying links between Huawei, our universities and China

    With its cast iron replica of Budapest's Liberty Bridge and its pale-stoned version of Versailles, visitors to Huawei's research centre in Dongguan could be forgiven for thinking they were in Europe. The Telegraph can disclose today that the controversial Chinese telecoms giant backed 17 scientific papers with UK universities, about cutting-edge “dual use” technologies – which can have civilian applications but can also be used in military technology. At least 15 of the papers focused on technology that experts claim could be used to communicate with swarms of drones or on highly advanced image recognition software that experts claim could be used for extreme levels of surveillance.

  • Fire and Fury: Crowd Attacks CNN Center in Atlanta
    The Daily Beast

    Fire and Fury: Crowd Attacks CNN Center in Atlanta

    CNN Center, the cable network's Atlanta headquarters, came under attack Friday night during protests over police brutality sparked by the death of an unarmed black man in Minneapolis. A largely peaceful demonstration erupted first in vandalism, then in violence. Cops used pepper spray, and then some in the crowd were seen smashing windows and defacing the giant CNN sign with spray-paint.

  • A partygoer who attended the now-infamous Lake of the Ozarks pool party has tested positive for COVID-19, meaning hundreds could have been exposed
    Business Insider

    A partygoer who attended the now-infamous Lake of the Ozarks pool party has tested positive for COVID-19, meaning hundreds could have been exposed

    A Missouri resident who attended a crowded pool party at the Lake of the Ozarks has tested positive for the coronavirus, local outlet KMBC reported. A Missouri citizen who attended a crowded pool party at the Lake of the Ozarks in Missouri over Memorial Day weekend has tested positive for the coronavirus, local outlet KMBC reported.

  • SpaceX, NASA to try again for landmark launch of two astronauts from Florida
    Reuters

    SpaceX, NASA to try again for landmark launch of two astronauts from Florida

    Elon Musk's private rocket company SpaceX was set for a repeat attempt at launching two Americans into orbit on Saturday from Florida for a mission that would mark the first spaceflight of NASA astronauts from U.S. soil in nine years. The mission's first launch try on Wednesday was called off with less than 17 minutes remaining on the countdown clock due to stormy weather around the Kennedy Space Center at Cape Canaveral. "Back-to-back wet dress rehearsals" disrupt the astronauts' sleep cycles, NASA chief Jim Bridenstine told a Friday news conference.

  • It's a bad week to be named Amy Cooper
    INSIDER

    It's a bad week to be named Amy Cooper

    Several women named Amy Cooper have found themselves on the receiving end of online hate this week. People have mistaken those women for the Amy Cooper who called the police on a Central Park bird-watcher. Two women named Amy Cooper told Insider that when the messages started rolling in, they weren't yet familiar with the now-infamous incident.

  • Trump announces probe of Chinese companies listed in US
    AFP

    Trump announces probe of Chinese companies listed in US

    US President Donald Trump on Friday ordered a probe into the actions of Chinese companies listed on American financial markets as tensions flared anew between the world's two biggest economies. The announcement followed Beijing's move to implement a new security law on semi-autonomous Hong Kong that critics say would stifle freedom, as well as with Trump's claims that China obfuscated the origins of the coronavirus that has killed more than 100,000 people in the United States. "I'm instructing my presidential working group on financial markets to study the differing practices of Chinese companies listed on the US financial markets with the goal of protecting American investors," Trump said, without providing details on what steps his administration might take.

  • NSA: Russian agents have been hacking major email program
    Associated Press

    NSA: Russian agents have been hacking major email program

    The U.S. National Security Agency says the same Russian military hacking group that interfered in the 2016 presidential election and unleashed a devastating malware attack the following year has been exploiting a major email server program since last August or earlier. The timing of the agency's advisory Thursday was unusual considering that the critical vulnerability in the Exim Mail Transfer Agent — which mostly runs on Unix-type operating systems — was identified 11 months ago, when a patch was issued. Exim is so widely used — though far less known than such commercial alternatives as Microsoft's proprietary Exchange — that some companies and government agencies that run it may still not have patched the vulnerability, said Jake Williams, president of Rendition Infosec and a former U.S. government hacker.

  • Derek Chauvin, officer arrested in George Floyd's death, has a record of shootings and complaints
    LA Times

    Derek Chauvin, officer arrested in George Floyd's death, has a record of shootings and complaints

    In 2005, two people died when their car was hit by a vehicle being chased by Chauvin and Officer Terry Nutter, according to a report by Communities United Against Police Brutality, a Minneapolis nonprofit that monitors police conduct. Another person who had been riding in the car died a few days later, the report said. The next year, Chauvin was among six officers who opened fire on Wayne Reyes, a stabbing suspect, after a chase that ended when he pointed a sawed-off shotgun at them, the St. Paul Pioneer Press reported.

  • Rudy Giuliani calls for resignations of mayor of Minneapolis, governor of Minnesota
    FOX News Videos

    Rudy Giuliani calls for resignations of mayor of Minneapolis, governor of Minnesota

    Don't elect progressive Democrats if you want to be safe, says former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani on 'Hannity.

  • Denmark and Norway cut coronavirus-hit Sweden out of free travel deal
    The Telegraph

    Denmark and Norway cut coronavirus-hit Sweden out of free travel deal

    The governments of Denmark and Norway have cut Sweden out of a deal allowing each other's tourists to travel freely between the two countries — citing their Nordic neighbour's higher levels of coronavirus infection. The deal, announced at parallel press conferences in Oslo and Copenhagen on Friday afternoon, showed Sweden has failed in its diplomatic efforts to be included in the first stage of a Nordic travel bubble. Under the deal, people from Denmark will from June 15 be allowed to enter Norway without needing to quarantine, while tourists from Norway will be able to enter Denmark, so long as they have booked accommodation for at least six days.