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  • One of Trump's favorite pollsters shows his approval plummeting
    Yahoo News

    One of Trump's favorite pollsters shows his approval plummeting

    President Trump's approval rating has plummeted since late February, according to the Rasmussen daily tracking poll, which the president frequently cited during his first three years in office. As of Wednesday, 42 percent of Americans told Rasmussen that they approved of the job Trump was doing as president, while 57 percent disapproved. While 42 percent approval is in line with the overall aggregation of polls tracking Trump's approval rating, it is notable from Rasmussen, which tends to show more favorable numbers for Republicans and the president.

  • Mississippi mayor refuses to resign after facing backlash for George Floyd comments: 'I didn't see anything unreasonable'
    USA TODAY

    Mississippi mayor refuses to resign after facing backlash for George Floyd comments: 'I didn't see anything unreasonable'

    Hal Marx, the mayor of Petal, Mississippi, rejected calls for his resignation after his comments in the wake of George Floyd's death in Minneapolis sparked controversy. Marx, who was first elected in 2009, said he was asking people to wait until all the facts were out before throwing stones at the police.

  • Iran outraged by 'honour killing' of 14-year-old girl Romina Ashrafi
    The Telegraph

    Iran outraged by 'honour killing' of 14-year-old girl Romina Ashrafi

    The killing of an Iranian teen by her father after she eloped with an older man sparked outrage on Wednesday, with local media denouncing "institutionalised violence" in "patriarchal" Iran. Iranian media covered the apparent "honour" crime extensively, with Ebtekar newspaper leading its front page with the headline "Unsafe father's house". According to local media, Romina Ashrafi was killed in her sleep on May 21 by her father, who decapitated her in the family home in Talesh in northern Gilan province.

  • Officer at center of George Floyd's death had history of prior complaints
    NBC News

    Officer at center of George Floyd's death had history of prior complaints

    The Minneapolis police officer seen kneeling on the neck of an unarmed black man heard saying "I can't breathe" multiple times before he died was a 19-year department veteran who was the subject of a dozen police conduct complaints that resulted in no disciplinary action. The officer, who was praised for valor during his career, also once fired his weapon during an encounter with a suspect, records show. The officer, Derek Chauvin, and three fellow officers were fired Tuesday from the Minneapolis Police Department, one day after the incident involving George Floyd, whose cries of physical pain were recorded on a cellphone video and whose death led to a wave of violent protests Wednesday nigh...

  • Canadian court rules against Huawei exec fighting extradition
    AFP

    Canadian court rules against Huawei exec fighting extradition

    Chinese Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou was dealt a legal setback Wednesday when a Canadian judge ruled that proceedings to extradite her to the United States will go ahead. The decision on so-called double criminality, a key test for extradition, found that bank fraud accusations against Meng would stand up in Canada. The interim ruling denying Meng's attempt to gain her freedom means she will continue to live in Vancouver under strict bail conditions while her case plays out.

  • More than 100,000 people have died of COVID-19 in the US, which is comparable to the number of residents in a city like Edison, New Jersey
    Business Insider

    More than 100,000 people have died of COVID-19 in the US, which is comparable to the number of residents in a city like Edison, New Jersey

    In just three months, the death toll from COVID-19 is also more than the number of "US military combat fatalities in every conflict since the Korean War," The New York Times reported. The vast majority of these deaths took place in hotspots like New York, and have disproportionately impacted black and Hispanic communities. Earlier this month, Business Insider reported that a third of all COVID-19 deaths happened in nursing homes.

  • A pharmacist known as 'the Mask Man' has been charged with hoarding $200,000 worth of N95 masks and price-gouging customers
    INSIDER

    A pharmacist known as 'the Mask Man' has been charged with hoarding $200,000 worth of N95 masks and price-gouging customers

    A New York pharmacist bought up $200,000 worth of N95 masks before the coronavirus pandemic grew severe in the US, then sold them at up to a 50% markup, prosecutors allege. The pharmacist, 66-year-old Richard Schirripa, sold more than $2,000 worth of masks to an undercover officer, and said during the transaction he felt "like a drug dealer standing out here." Schirripa has been arrested and charged with violating the Defense Production Act by hoarding and price-gouging.

  • Why India must battle the shame of period stain
    BBC

    Why India must battle the shame of period stain

    Coronavirus sparks a sanitary pad crisis in India Stripped for standing up to 'period-phobic' college Of course, period poverty does not only affect women in India. According to Plan International UK, an international development charity, one in 10 disadvantaged girls below the age of 21 cannot afford sanitary products and uses unhygienic substitutes such as newspaper, toilet paper and socks. From an early age, girls learn to live with the pain and fear and seldom do we see a girl seek help when in physical or mental discomfort due to periods.

  • Pelosi calls on Trump to 'take responsibility' for coronavirus response
    Yahoo News Video

    Pelosi calls on Trump to 'take responsibility' for coronavirus response

    In a press conference Wednesday, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi called on President Trump to “stop making excuses. Take responsibility” for his response to the coronavirus pandemic.

  • Trump's draft executive order targeting social media companies sparks battle inside the White House
    Yahoo News

    Trump's draft executive order targeting social media companies sparks battle inside the White House

    The Trump White House has been embroiled in a vigorous internal debate over whether to issue an executive order aimed at punishing social media companies for perceived political bias, with opposition to the order coming from some of the most conservative parts of the administration. White House sources tell Yahoo News that the office of Vice President Mike Pence, National Economic Council Chairman Larry Kudlow and others are making the argument that it will set a bad precedent to signal that the federal government can go after private companies and seek to penalize them for purely political reasons. “There is pushback from a lot of people” inside the White House, an administration official told Yahoo News, saying there is “a lot of frustration” among advisers who are often some of the president's most loyal backers.

  • Petition calling for UK PM's aide to be sacked passes one million signatures
    Reuters

    Petition calling for UK PM's aide to be sacked passes one million signatures

    A petition calling for British Prime Minister Boris Johnson's closest aide to be sacked after he took a long-distance journey during the country's coronavirus lockdown has been signed by more than one million people. Dominic Cummings travelled 400 km (250 miles) from London to the northern English city of Durham in March with his four-year-old son and his wife, who was sick with suspected COVID-19 at the time, to be close to relatives. He has refused to apologise for that journey, or another to a local castle that he said he took to test his eyes and driving ability after falling ill, and which British police said may have breached lockdown rules.

  • Five UK mercenaries offered $150,000 each to fly helicopters for Gen Haftar in Libya, say UN
    The Telegraph

    Five UK mercenaries offered $150,000 each to fly helicopters for Gen Haftar in Libya, say UN

    Five British mercenaries involved in an operation to fly assault helicopters for Libya's renegade General Khalifa Haftar were offered bounties of up to $150,000 each for their role in the daring plot which went awry. The men, comprised of former Royal Marines and RAF personnel, were among 20 foreign mercenaries who traveled to Libya last June in an operation to pilot assault helicopters and speed boats to intercept Turkish ships ferrying weapons to Haftar's opponents – the UN-backed government in Tripoli. The Telegraph can reveal that the UN investigation concluded that the operation was led by Steven Lodge, a former South African Air Force officer who also served in the British military.

  • Long Island serial killer victim IDed 2 decades later
    Associated Press

    Long Island serial killer victim IDed 2 decades later

    A woman whose skeletal remains were found along a suburban New York beach highway, in an area where body parts of 10 other people had been strewn, was identified as a Philadelphia escort who went missing two decades ago, police said Thursday. Suffolk County police said the woman previously known as “Jane Doe No. 6” was identified through genetic genealogy technology as Valerie Mack, who also went by Melissa Taylor and was last seen in 2000 near Atlantic City, New Jersey. Determining the victim's identity has brought clarity to a long-running Long Island mystery that attracted national headlines, was featured on true-crime TV shows and was the subject of a recent Netflix film, Police Commissioner Geraldine Hart said.

  • Iran Guards warn US after receiving new combat vessels
    AFP

    Iran Guards warn US after receiving new combat vessels

    Iran's Revolutionary Guards on Thursday warned the United States against its naval presence in the Gulf as they received 110 new combat vessels. The vessels included Ashura-class speedboats, Zolfaghar coastal patrol boats and Taregh submarines, state television reported. "We announce today that wherever the Americans are, we are right next to them, and they will feel our presence even more in the near future," the Guards' navy chief Rear Admiral Alireza Tangsiri said during a ceremony in southern Iran.

  • This Neo-Futuristic Home Found Its Inspiration in the British Countryside
    Architectural Digest

    This Neo-Futuristic Home Found Its Inspiration in the British Countryside

    Located in the rolling hills of southeast England, the design was meant to mimic the beer-brewing structures that once dotted the landscape Originally Appeared on Architectural Digest

  • The U.S. Might Revoke Hong Kong's 'Special Status.' Here's What That Means For Business in the Global Financial Hub
    Time

    The U.S. Might Revoke Hong Kong's 'Special Status.' Here's What That Means For Business in the Global Financial Hub

    Secretary of State Mike Pompeo announced on Wednesday that Hong Kong was no longer sufficiently autonomous from mainland China — an assessment that could threaten the city's trading relationship with the U.S. and deal a blow to both American and Chinese companies operating there. The news comes following Beijing's decision late last week to draw up a national security law for Hong Kong. The move came after Hong Kong's Legislative Council failed in its obligations to enact such a law since the former British colony was handed back to China in 1997.

  • The Chinese CDC now says the coronavirus didn't jump to people at the Wuhan wet market — instead, it was the site of a super-spreader event
    Business Insider

    The Chinese CDC now says the coronavirus didn't jump to people at the Wuhan wet market — instead, it was the site of a super-spreader event

    Experts think the new coronavirus originated in bats, then jumped to humans via an intermediary animal species. Initially, authorities in Wuhan, China — where the first cases were reported— thought that jump happened at a local wet market. Now, the Chinese CDC has ruled out the market as a possible origin site for the outbreak.

  • Senate Democrats take on GOP court-packing in blistering new report
    NBC News

    Senate Democrats take on GOP court-packing in blistering new report

    Senate Democrats on Wednesday unveiled a new report on Republican efforts to pack the courts with conservative-leaning judges and the outsized influence of one conservative activist. "Our report exposes a twisted web of dark money, and special interest groups who behind the scenes are investing millions and millions to plant ideological activist judges completely remake the courts, and ultimately rewrite the Constitution," said Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y. As part of their report, the senators pointed to activist Leonard Leo, the former head of the conservative Federalist Society, as the driving force behind the many of the president's appointments, including Supreme Court Justices Brett Kavanaugh and Neil Gorsuch.

  • Coronavirus deaths in US top 100,000
    BBC

    Coronavirus deaths in US top 100,000

    Globally there have been 5.6 million people recorded as infected and 354,983 deaths since the virus emerged in the Chinese city of Wuhan last year. The US death toll stands at 100,276, according to Johns Hopkins University in Maryland, which has been tracking the pandemic. It means that around as many Americans have died from Covid-19 as from the Korea, Vietnam, Iraq and Afghanistan wars combined.

  • EU can move on Brexit, but needs UK to budge, EU trade chief says
    Reuters

    EU can move on Brexit, but needs UK to budge, EU trade chief says

    The European Union is willing to move in negotiations on future EU-UK relations, but Britain must make a bigger effort to do the same in talks next week, the EU trade chief said on Thursday. EU trade commissioner Phil Hogan told EU lawmakers that the negotiations had not made much progress to date. Britain told the EU on Wednesday it needed to break a fundamental impasse to clinch a Brexit trade deal by the end of the year and said an agreement on fisheries might not be ready by July.

  • The police officer who knelt on George Floyd's neck has been involved in shootings and was the subject of 10 complaints
    INSIDER

    The police officer who knelt on George Floyd's neck has been involved in shootings and was the subject of 10 complaints

    Richard Tsong-Taatarii/Star Tribune via Getty Images Derek Chauvin, the white Minneapolis police officer who was fired after a video showed him kneeling on the neck of a black man, George Floyd, who later died, has a history of involvement in violent incidents and police shootings. He's been involved in several police shootings and has been the subject of complaints by the city's Civilian Review Authority and the Office of Police Conduct reviews on 10 occasions. As Chauvin knelt on Floyd's neck, another since-ousted officer, Tou Thao, stood guard.

  • Mexican drug lord pleads poverty in bid to escape arrest
    Associated Press

    Mexican drug lord pleads poverty in bid to escape arrest

    Drug lord Rafael Caro Quintero, a notorious underworld figure who is on the FBI's most wanted list for the murder of a federal agent over three decades ago, said in a legal appeal that he has no money, is too old to work and has no pension. The odd plea was filed Tuesday by Caro Quintero's lawyer seeking an injunction against his arrest or extradition to the United States for the kidnapping and murder of DEA Special Agent Enrique Camarena in Mexico in 1985. The court papers state: “The plaintiff argues insolvency, because he says he is more than 60 years old, is neither retired nor has a pension, and given the fact that he is a fugitive from the law, cannot work or perform any activity to ea...

  • Russia slams 'dangerous' US foreign policy moves
    AFP

    Russia slams 'dangerous' US foreign policy moves

    Russia said on Thursday the United States was acting in a dngerous and unpredictable way, after Washington withdrew from a key military treaty and moved to ramp up pressure on Iran. Foreign ministry spokeswoman Maria Zakharova made the comments after Washington announced it would end sanctions waivers for nations that remain in a nuclear accord signed with Iran. The remaining parties to the deal include Britain, China, France, Germany and Russia.

  • Marauding monkeys attack lab technician and steal Covid-19 tests
    The Telegraph

    Marauding monkeys attack lab technician and steal Covid-19 tests

    A band of marauding monkeys has attacked a laboratory technician and stolen three Covid-19 test samples, raising fears they will infect themselves and then spread the deadly disease to humans. The worker was attacked outside a medical college in Meerut, northern India, while transporting samples from patients suspected of having coronavirus. Others saw the funny side of the monkey attack, with the incident coming days after the Indian authorities detained a pigeon in Jammu & Kashmir on suspicion of spying for Pakistan.

  • The next 100 days: How the coronavirus will continue to change your life at home, at work, at school and beyond
    USA TODAY

    The next 100 days: How the coronavirus will continue to change your life at home, at work, at school and beyond

    It didn't take much longer than 100 days for the coronavirus to claim the lives of 100,000 Americans, an unimaginable toll when the first person in the U.S. died of COVID-19, believed to have happened Feb. 6 in California. The social distancing measures widely adopted throughout the country succeeded in slowing down the virus' spread, as borne out by the diminished rates of new infections and deaths in May – but not enough to keep the U.S. from reaching the grim milestone of 100,000 deaths Wednesday, according to the Johns Hopkins University data dashboard. USA TODAY consulted experts in a variety of fields, including public health, business, history, social sciences and the hospitality industry, to get an assessment of what the new normal may look like in the next 100 days.