Want $125k? Just Donate Your Face to Some Humanoid Robots

Courtney Linder
Photo credit: gremlin - Getty Images

From Popular Mechanics

  • Additive manufacturing company Geomiq is asking for volunteers to send in photos of their face to be considered for a new line of humanoid robots.
  • If selected, the person signing over the rights to their likeness will receive over $125,000 in compensation.
  • The client is mysterious, but Geomiq says the company is working on robots for elderly care, and those prototypes will be produced next year.

Need a pile of cash, fast? Have a face? Then step right up to waive the copyrights to it. In exchange, you'll receive about $125,000. And best of all, one day you'll see your mug on an army of humanoid robots.

Geomiq, an additive manufacturing and machining startup based in London, is looking for a person to fork over their face for a new line of human-looking robots. Full stop.

The star search came through a blog post the company published earlier this month. Geomiq isn't the brains behind the operation, according to the post, but will be working on behalf of a mysterious client looking for a "kind and friendly" face for its robots.

"A few weeks ago we were approached by a robotics company asking if we could help it with the finishing touches of a state-of-the-art humanoid robot it’s been working on," the company wrote. "Details of the project are scarce due to a non-disclosure agreement we’ve signed with the designer and his investors, but this is what we do know."

While the details are tight under wraps, we do know there's potential for said face to be mass produced on thousands of robots. In terms of the client, little was disclosed outside the fact that the company is privately funded and has taken investments from venture capitalists and a fund in Shanghai.

The robot is meant to work as a "virtual friend" for elderly people, so there's a good chance this client works in the medical field. The project has been underway for five years and is expected to go into production next year.

As for the secretiveness? The company in question said it wants anonymity due to the nature of the product. But the robot will soon be "readily available" to the public, and the company thinks this campaign will create some buzz ahead of the official release.

The good news: If your face is indeed selected, you'll at least be fully debriefed on the details. But you won't be contacted if you aren't chosen.

"We know that this is an extremely unique request, and signing over the licenses to your face is potentially an extremely big decision," Geomiq wrote in the blog post.

No kidding.

If you're still interested, you can send an email with a photo of your face to faces@geomiq.com.

Good luck, I guess?

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