Watch: Struggling Tom Brady holes approach shot for a birdie

Golf Channel Digital

Tom Brady says he’s an 8.1 handicap – just like JaMarcus Russell claimed to be an NFL quarterback.

Technically, both statements hold truth, but Brady looked more Russell than G.O.A.T. on the golf course Sunday.

Brady, teaming with Phil Mickelson against Tiger Woods and Peyton Manning in The Match: Champions for Charity, started horribly on the front nine at Medalist Golf Club in Hobe Sound, Florida.

Brady was playing so poorly in the better-ball format, that Medalist member Brooks Koepka offered to donate $100,000 to Koepka’s own charity if Brady – a single-digit handicap – could make a par on the front nine. A single par.

Brady didn’t make a par. But, after slapping it around on the par-5 seventh, he holed this approach shot for birdie.

The shot was so good, Brady split his pants.

Unfortunately, it wasn’t enough to win the hole – and Woods and Manning almost won it when Woods horseshoed a 35-footer for eagle.

It was a hard-earned tie, to keep Brady and Mickelson 2 down. But it was good enough for $100,000 to go to the Brooks Koepka Charity Foundation.

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