Rail passenger injured after wave smashes through window of moving train

Joe Gamp
Contributor, Yahoo News UK
A train passes through Dawlish, Devon, on the coastal railway line as large waves hit the sea wall. (Reuters)

A rail passenger was left with minor injuries after a huge sea wave crashed through the windows of a moving train.

The 1057 Exmouth to Paignton service was travelling through Dawlish station in Devon on Thursday, when a wave crashed on to the side of the train and broke through its windows.

South Western Ambulance Service was called to Dawlish Railway Station at 12pm after it received reports reports of a train passenger being injured.

Large waves crash as a train passes through Dawlish. (Reuters)

The service confirmed they treated one passenger for minor injuries, and that they did not require hospital treatment.

Great Western Railway said “sea debris” had caused damage to the train.

A spokesperson said: “The 1057 from Exmouth to Paignton has been damaged by sea debris. The train has moved now moved forward and the damaged carriage taken out of service.

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“The 1052 Paignton to Paddington service has a train fault between Teignmouth and Dawlish. The fault which has developed on this train has yet to be investigated.”

The British Transport Police said: "We were called today at 12pm to reports of a train window being smashed by a wave at Dawlish. One person with very minor injuries was checked out at the scene as a precaution. We understand the damage caused was a couple of smashed windows. It happened on Station Road close to the station. The line has since been reopened."

Trains that are now leaving Plymouth for Exeter St Davids and beyond are running on time.

Last February it was announced that a wall would be built to protect the seafront railway line, which washed into the sea in 2014.

Up to £80m of government funding will be made available for the project.

The structure will be 2.5 metres higher than the existing five-metre tall wall, to increase protection to the railway from waves during adverse weather.