Wednesday evening UK news briefing: Four ways to beat Rishi Sunak's Budget tax raid

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Chris Price
·6 min read
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Your evening briefing from the Telegraph
Your evening briefing from the Telegraph

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Five years of tax pain set out in Rishi Sunak's Budget

Rishi Sunak braced the public for five years of tax pain as he announced hikes in corporation tax, duties and freezes in personal allowances. Setting out his long-term plan to get the public finances under control, the Chancellor revealed that corporation tax would rise from 19pc to 25pc from 2023, although smaller businesses will be exempt. Amid a raft of hikes, Mr Sunak told the Commons his tax rises "might not be popular but they are honest", as he was warned the total cost of Britain's Covid response will reach £407bn by the end of next year. At a Downing Street press briefing, he insisted the Government "believes in supporting business". Read everything the Chancellor announced and use our tax calculator to work out if you are a winner or loser from his fiscal plan. If you may struggle, read on for four ways to beat Mr Sunak's tax raid.

There was good news on the cost of living, with fuel and alcohol duties frozen and the stamp duty holiday extended by six months in a massive victory for the Telegraph's Stamp out the Duty campaign. Hundreds of jobs will be relocated from London to Darlington under the Chancellor's Treasury North project. Perhaps the most novel announcement was that of "super deductions" of 130pc against profits for business investment. Telegraph writers give their verdicts on a Chancellor in campaign mode while Jonathan Saxty and Ben Habib argue that extending furlough until September will choke the post-Covid economic recovery.

Sturgeon was not out to 'get' Salmond, she tells inquiry

Nicola Sturgeon has come out fighting in her long-awaited appearance at the Holyrood inquiry into her government's unlawful investigation of Alex Salmond. In a mammoth evidence session lasting more than eight hours, the First Minister apologised for the "serious mistakes" made in the handling of Mr Salmond's alleged sexual harassment claims, but insisted that she was not out to "get" her predecessor. In the middle of her evidence, Mr Salmond lodged a formal complaint about a Scottish Government official who allegedly leaked the name of a woman who complained about him to his former chief of staff. Gareth Davies has a blow by blow account of Ms Sturgeon's appearance while Tom Harris reckons the First Minister's spin and deflection isn't fooling anyone.

Sussexes 2018 tour 'stressful' for staff and left one upset

The Duchess of Sussex has claimed she is a victim of a "smear campaign" over allegations that she faced several complaints of bullying from members of her staff. Yet there are fresh claims the Duke and Duchess of Sussex's autumn 2018 tour of Australia, New Zealand, Fiji and Tonga was "stressful" for staff, with at least one aide visibly upset after a discussion with the Duchess. The bullying allegations appear completely at odds with Harry and Meghan's "compassion and kindness" agenda. Camilla Tominey analyses why the timing could not be worse for Brand Harry and Meghan as ITV reveals it has won the rights to air the Duke and Duchess of Sussex's interview with Oprah Winfrey in the UK.

At a glance: More coronavirus headlines

Also in the news: Today's other headlines

PM risks fresh row with EU | Boris Johnson will act unilaterally to give supermarkets and their suppliers more time to adapt to post-Brexit trade arrangements in Northern Ireland, risking a major escalation of tensions with Brussels. Read on for details as James Crisp and Harry Yorke analyse how Lord Frost has wasted no time in ruffling Brussels' feathers.

Around the world: More dead in Myanmar crackdowns

In one photo, a young woman crouches among fellow protesters against the coup in Myanmar, looking defiantly towards security forces, wearing a black T-shirt that says "everything will be ok". Minutes later, she was dead - another young life suddenly snuffed out simply for demanding democracy. A second photo of her lifeless body, stretched out on a gurney with blood oozing from her head, joined many other horrific images flooding out of Myanmar today, documenting at least 18 more victims of violent military crackdowns on peaceful rallies.

Wednesday interview

'I wrote some songs that were so sickly I threw them in the bin'

Rory Graham, aka Rag’n’Bone Man
Rory Graham, aka Rag’n’Bone Man

Singer-songwriter Rag'n'Bone Man on getting divorced, becoming a father and making his long-awaited second album, Life By Misadventure

Read the full interview

Comment and analysis

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  3. The lockdown libido slump | Why the pandemic has put us off sex

Business and money briefing

Hot air | Ryanair boss Michael O'Leary has launched a searing attack on a Global Travel Taskforce set up by Boris Johnson with the aim of allowing millions of Britons to jet off on overseas holidays this summer.

Sport briefing

Premier League | Manchester City's highly impressive 21-game winning streak means the quadruple is a stronger prospect than ever before. Luke Edwards analysis why such an outcome would not be good for English football. Meanwhile, JJ Bull sets out why Thomas Tuchel and Jurgen Klopp are not as similar as their reputations suggest.

Three things for tonight

And finally... for this evening's downtime

The unstoppable rise of woke toys | The renaming of Hasbro's bestseller Mr Potato Head is part of a growing trend to remove gender-specific labels from children's toys. Poppie Platt looks at other brands being sucked into the "online culture war".