Wednesday, January 8th: A Lost Hiker and an Amazing Coincidence

A footnote to a near death experience.

  • Trump says Democrats' push for expanded voting threatens Republicans
    Yahoo News

    Trump says Democrats' push for expanded voting threatens Republicans

    President Trump on Monday criticized attempts by Democrats in Congress to expand voting access for the presidential election in the fall, saying increased voter turnout would keep Republicans from getting elected. Trump said that Democrat-proposed voting reforms to the $2.2 trillion rescue package passed last week by Congress — which were largely cut from the deal — would have led to “levels of voting, that if you ever agreed to it you'd never have a Republican elected in this country again.” Democrats have pushed to mandate that states make plans to expand early voting and mail-in balloting for the fall election, in the event that the coronavirus pandemic makes in-person voting unsafe.

  • First minor with coronavirus in New York City dies
    NBC News

    First minor with coronavirus in New York City dies

    The first death of a minor who tested positive for coronavirus in New York City was reported Monday, as the city's death toll rose to 790. Like the majority of those who have died from COVID-19, the minor had an underlying health condition. While the vast majority of COVID-19 deaths in the United States have been among people above 18-years-old, this is not the first U.S. death of a minor.

  • Senior Italian cardinal, papal vicar for Rome, has coronavirus
    Reuters

    Senior Italian cardinal, papal vicar for Rome, has coronavirus

    Cardinal Angelo De Donatis, Pope Francis' vicar for the diocese of Rome, on Monday became the highest-ranking Catholic official known to test positive for coronavirus. De Donatis' office said he was tested for the virus after feeling unwell and was admitted to a Rome hospital. A pope is also the bishop of Rome but appoints someone to act as his vicar to administrate the vast diocese.

  • Mexico's president defends his handshake with 'El Chapo' Guzman's mother — a 'respectable old lady'
    Business Insider

    Mexico's president defends his handshake with 'El Chapo' Guzman's mother — a 'respectable old lady'

    Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador on Monday defended his weekend handshake with the mother of drug lord Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman, calling her a "respectable old lady" and seeking to cast his critics as the principal menace to the country. In a 30-second video posted on Twitter on Sunday, Lopez Obrador could be seen approaching Maria Consuelo Loera's car, parked on a dirt road on the outskirts of Badiraguato, a mountainous municipality in the northwestern state of Sinaloa. Surrounded by onlookers, Lopez Obrador told Loera she need not get out of the car, they shook hands and after a brief exchange he told her he had "received her letter."

  • 29 Best Closet Organization Ideas to Maximize Space and Style
    Architectural Digest

    29 Best Closet Organization Ideas to Maximize Space and Style

    How to organize your closet like a pro Originally Appeared on Architectural Digest

  • Bloomberg

    Venezuela’s Guaido Seeks Coalition to Oust Maduro Regime

    Venezuela National Assembly President Juan Guaido called for a broad coalition to form a “national emergency government” to replace Nicolas Maduro's regime and get financing to save lives as the coronavirus crisis spreads. Such a government “must be broad and include all the necessary political and social sectors to confront this severe emergency,” Guaido said in a video message published on his Twitter account on Saturday night. Guaido said his team has developed what's being called the Jose Maria Vargas plan to deal with the coronavirus response.

  • Police commander killed, 2 officers wounded in Phoenix shooting
    USA TODAY

    Police commander killed, 2 officers wounded in Phoenix shooting

    PHOENIX – A 31-year Phoenix police veteran was killed and two other officers were injured when a man opened fire on them during a call about a disturbance between roommates in northwest Phoenix Sunday night, authorities said. Commander Greg Carnicle has died after being shot, police said. The shooting drew a massive police response at the scene, with dozens of police vehicles and tactical trucks.

  • Fit, healthy 33-year-old recounts falling ill to coronavirus
    Associated Press

    Fit, healthy 33-year-old recounts falling ill to coronavirus

    Still, Napoli, a lawyer in Rome, developed a cough and fever less than a week after Italy's premier locked down the entire nation, including the capital which had continued life as usual while the virus raged in the north. Until that day, Napoli was following his routine of work, jogging and swimming. He received a positive diagnosis for COVID-19 three days later.

  • US man teaching dog how to drive arrested after high-speed chase
    AFP

    US man teaching dog how to drive arrested after high-speed chase

    A resident of the western US state of Washington was arrested following a high-speed chase that left officers dumbfounded after they found the man's pit bull behind the wheel. The incident unfolded Sunday afternoon after police received calls about a driver hitting two vehicles in an area south of Seattle and then speeding away, state trooper Heather Axtman told AFP. Axtman said that as officers gave chase, they got close to the vehicle -- a 1996 Buick -- and were shocked to see a pit bull in the driver's seat and a man steering and pushing the gas pedal from the passenger side.

  • Coronavirus: 'Millions' of Americans could be infected, expert warns
    BBC

    Coronavirus: 'Millions' of Americans could be infected, expert warns

    Dr Anthony Fauci, the face of the Trump administration's coronavirus task force, made the prediction on Sunday. Dr Fauci added that the US, which now has the most recorded cases of the virus in the world, was the "focus" of the global outbreak. "We've got a serious problem in New York, we have a serious problem in New Orleans, and we're going to be developing serious problems in other areas," he said.

  • U.S. is swiftly deporting migrant children at the border
    CBS News

    U.S. is swiftly deporting migrant children at the border

    Citing a public health order to curb the coronavirus pandemic, the Trump administration is swiftly deporting unaccompanied migrant minors apprehended near the U.S.-Mexico border, upending a long-standing practice required under a federal law designed to protect children from violence and exploitation. Despite initially maintaining that the new measures would not apply to unaccompanied minors, Customs and Border Protection on Monday said its officials could deny entry to children who cross the southern border alone under an order by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or CDC. The agency said some minors could be excluded from the CDC directive if a border official "suspects trafficking or sees signs of illness."

  • U.S. spies find coronavirus spread in China, North Korea, Russia hard to chart
    Reuters

    U.S. spies find coronavirus spread in China, North Korea, Russia hard to chart

    As U.S. spy agencies seek to assemble a precise picture of the world's coronavirus outbreaks, they are finding serious gaps in their ability to assess the situation in China, Russia and North Korea, according to five U.S. government sources familiar with the intelligence reporting. The agencies also have limited insight into the full impact of the pandemic in Iran, although information on infections and deaths among the ruling class and public is becoming more available on official and social media, two sources said.

  • 'I know without any doubt that I'm going to lose colleagues': New York hospital workers at the front line describe the stark reality of their working conditions, comparing facilities to a 'petri dish'
    Business Insider

    'I know without any doubt that I'm going to lose colleagues': New York hospital workers at the front line describe the stark reality of their working conditions, comparing facilities to a 'petri dish'

    Hospital workers in New York — the epicenter of the US coronavirus outbreak — describe the stark reality of treating patients amid a shortage of personal protective equipment (PPE). One doctor described working conditions like a "petri dish" as coronavirus patients flood hospital hallways, The New York Times reported. As of March 30, the coronavirus has infected at least 67,384 people in New York, and the death toll in the state has surpassed 2,700.

  • Pelosi on virus: ‘As the president fiddles, people are dying’
    Yahoo News Video

    Pelosi on virus: ‘As the president fiddles, people are dying’

    As the president fiddles, people are dying,” said House Speaker Nancy Pelosi during an interview on Sunday morning.

  • Mexico's president shifts tone on coronavirus, urges people to stay home, warns of dire consequences
    LA Times

    Mexico's president shifts tone on coronavirus, urges people to stay home, warns of dire consequences

    As the coronavirus pandemic spreads, Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador has been criticized for what many called a lackadaisical posture — urging people to hug, shaking hands and kissing well-wishers as he stumped and extolling his personal talismans: Catholic scapulars, a shamrock and $2 bill. “Continue bringing the family to eat in restaurants,” López Obrador advised compatriots, arguing that such activity bolsters “the popular economy.” Although still avoiding curfews and mandatory stay-at-home orders, Mexican authorities are now abruptly citing a final chance to avert a national catastrophe that would inundate the country's limited healthcare infrastructure and probably result in many deaths.

  • Wuhan Residents Dismiss Official Coronavirus Death Toll: ‘The Incinerators Have Been Working Around the Clock’
    National Review

    Wuhan Residents Dismiss Official Coronavirus Death Toll: ‘The Incinerators Have Been Working Around the Clock’

    Wuhan residents are increasingly skeptical of the Chinese Communist Party's reported coronavirus death count of approximately 2,500 deaths in the city to date, with most people believing the actual number is at least 40,000. “Maybe the authorities are gradually releasing the real figures, intentionally or unintentionally, so that people will gradually come to accept the reality,” a Wuhan resident, who gave only his surname Mao, told Radio Free Asia. A city source added that, based on the aggregation of funeral and cremation numbers, authorities likely know the real number and are keeping it under wraps.

  • Associated Press

    Europe's trade system with Iran finally makes first deal

    European countries trying to keep Iran's nuclear deal with world powers alive said Tuesday that a system they set up to enable trade with Tehran has finally concluded its first transaction, facilitating the export of medical goods. Britain, France and Germany conceived the complex barter-type system dubbed INSTEX, which aims to protect companies doing business with Iran from American sanctions, in January 2019. The move came months after President Donald Trump unilaterally withdrew the United States from the nuclear deal that Tehran struck with world powers in 2015 and reimposed sanctions.

  • Open coffins are left on roads to remind people to stay inside while soldiers shoot disinfectant from water cannons. Here's what lockdown for 57 million people in the Philippines looks like.
    INSIDER

    Open coffins are left on roads to remind people to stay inside while soldiers shoot disinfectant from water cannons. Here's what lockdown for 57 million people in the Philippines looks like.

    Ezra Acayan/Getty The Philippines' main island Luzon, which has a population of more than 57 million, is on lockdown. Along with people's movements being restricted, soldiers are covering residents and the streets in disinfectant, and open coffins have been left on the roads as a warning to people to stay inside. On Sunday, the Philippines reported 343 new coronavirus cases in a day — its highest one day increase yet.

  • Coronavirus: Aldi, Morrisons, Waitrose and Asda lift some restrictions
    BBC

    Coronavirus: Aldi, Morrisons, Waitrose and Asda lift some restrictions

    Aldi, Morrisons, Waitrose and Asda are easing restrictions on some of their products which were imposed in the wake of stockpiling earlier this month. Aldi is now scrapping limits completely on all but a few items, while Morrisons, Waitrose and Asda have also removed some limits and changed others. Meanwhile, grocery sales in the UK were at record levels in March.

  • Check Out the First Photos from the Navy's Hospital Ship in Los Angeles
    Military.com

    Check Out the First Photos from the Navy's Hospital Ship in Los Angeles

    USNS Mercy, one of the U.S. Navy's two seaborne floating hospitals, has deployed all over the world in support of humanitarian operations and training exercises. Mercy is not the only help sought by the city. Mayor Eric Garcetti announced via Twitter that the LA Convention Center will be converted to a federal field hospital and that the California National Guard will also be mobilized to help local hospitals.

  • Trump in Close Race With Biden, ABC Poll Shows: Campaign Update
    Bloomberg

    Trump in Close Race With Biden, ABC Poll Shows: Campaign Update

    Donald Trump and Joe Biden are in a tight race for the White House, as Americans focus on the response to the coronavirus pandemic, according to a Washington Post-ABC News poll released Sunday. Trump has closed a 7-point deficit from February and is in a statistical tie with the former vice president, 47% to 49%, among registered voters. Biden, the front-runner for the Democratic presidential nomination, is more trusted by voters on health care and Trump more trusted on the economy, according to the poll.

  • After more than 10,000 coronavirus deaths — the worst in the world — Italy is showing signs that its 3-week lockdown is working
    Business Insider

    After more than 10,000 coronavirus deaths — the worst in the world — Italy is showing signs that its 3-week lockdown is working

    Remo Casilli/Reuters Italy is showing very early signs that it's turning a corner with the coronavirus outbreak as the numbers of new reported deaths and cases have slowed, according to multiple reports. The country's strict three-week lockdown is due to be lifted on Friday, but officials have said it's likely to be extended. It's a sign that those under lockdown "save lives" by staying home, Luca Richeldi, a government health adviser, said on Sunday.

  • France moves patients from swamped hospitals as death toll climbs
    Reuters

    France moves patients from swamped hospitals as death toll climbs

    France used two high-speed trains and a German military plane to move more than three dozen critically ill coronavirus patients on Sunday to ease the pressure on overwhelmed hospitals in eastern France. The Grand Est region was the first in France to be hit by a wave of coronavirus infections that has rapidly moved westwards to engulf the greater Paris region, where hospitals are desperately adding intensive care beds to cope with the influx. The number of coronavirus deaths in France since March 1 climbed 13% to 2,606 on Sunday, while the total number of confirmed infections rose above 40,000.

  • What does furlough mean? Can I leave my home under shelter-in-place? Coronavirus terms, explained
    USA TODAY

    What does furlough mean? Can I leave my home under shelter-in-place? Coronavirus terms, explained

    And do health care professionals say they need ventilators or respirators – or both? Three weeks ago, USA TODAY published a guide to new vocabulary words popping up as the new coronavirus spreads globally. As the situation around the world changes, new words have entered dinner table conversations and social media feeds.

  • Fact check: will Covid-19 fade in the summer – then return later like the flu?
    The Guardian

    Fact check: will Covid-19 fade in the summer – then return later like the flu?

    Dr Marc Lipsitch: What makes seasonal viruses seasonal is a combination of opportunities for transmission – whether school is in term, which facilitates transmission – and what proportion of the population is immune, combined with weather. Humidity is lower in the winter, which is good for transmission. Low humidity makes [virus-carrying] droplets settle more slowly because they shrink to smaller sizes and then friction keeps them in the air, whereas high humidity doesn't do that.