What's on the Arizona ballot for the November 2022 election?

Arizona
Arizona

Arizona will elect a new governor, secretary of state and attorney general in the Nov. 8 election.

All three Republicans running for those offices are supporters of former President Donald Trump and question the results of the 2020 presidential election.

Other statewide elected offices on the ballot include the superintendent of public instruction, treasurer, two members of the Arizona Corporation Commission and the mine inspector.

In addition, voters will decide on 10 ballot measures.

Control of the Arizona Legislature also is up for grabs, with all 90 seats in play.

Below is a guide for voters on each significant race in the state, with information to help decide whom you want as your representative in these important roles.

Governor | Secretary of state | Attorney general | TreasurerCorporation Commission | Superintendent of public instruction | Mine inspector | Legislature | Ballot measures | Arizona judges | Central Arizona Water Conservation District

Governor

The Governor's Office is Arizona's top elected position. The governor oversees the executive branch and state agencies, signs or vetoes bills, proposes a budget and appoints Supreme Court justices, among other duties. Candidates for the four-year term are:

Katie Hobbs, the current secretary of state, a former lawmaker and Democratic candidate who has defended the 2020 election.

Kari Lake, a former television news anchor and Republican candidate who is endorsed by Donald Trump.

Kari Lake (left) and Katie Hobbs are running for Arizona governor.
Kari Lake (left) and Katie Hobbs are running for Arizona governor.

ADDITIONAL COVERAGE  

Why Hobbs won't recuse herself: Kari Lake wants Katie Hobbs to step away from election duties. That would be outside the norm

Campaign fact check: In Kari Lake's campaign for governor, misinformation and deception remain hallmarks

Kari Lake solo interview: Arizona governor candidate Kari Lake says 'I don't have faith' in election system

Katie Hobbs solo interview: After drama over governor debate, Katie Hobbs does solo interview with Arizona PBS

Candidates on education: Here’s what Lake, Hobbs want for education in Arizona

Candidates on water supply: How would Katie Hobbs, Kari Lake address Arizona's water issues as governor? Here's what they propose

Candidates on the border: What would Kari Lake and Katie Hobbs do at the border? Candidates have sharply different approaches

Candidates on abortion: As Arizona courts weigh law, where do Kari Lake and Katie Hobbs stand on abortion and birth control?

Where does she stand? How Kari Lake's position on abortion has shifted since the primary election

Targeting immigrants: Echoing Trump, Arizona governor candidate Kari Lake calls immigrants 'rapists'

Q&A with Katie Hobbs: What would a Katie Hobbs administration in the Governor's Office look like? Candidate answers questions

Governor debate: Arizona PBS, ASU under fire from Kari Lake's campaign after decision to give Katie Hobbs an interview

Off again: Kari Lake interview on Arizona PBS canceled after Clean Elections Commission backs out amid rancor

Katie Hobbs makes it official: No debate with Kari Lake in Arizona governor race

Hobbs' unreported income: Facing financial struggles, Katie Hobbs got a side gig. She didn't report the income as required

Candidates talk policy: Hobbs, Lake talk taxes, pandemic policies and how they would govern Arizona

Primary results: What primary voting patterns in Maricopa County say about Lake, Finchem and the general election ahead

Challenge to voting: Lake, Finchem lawsuit to ban voting machines tossed due to lack of evidence of problems

Get to know Katie Hobbs: Who is Katie Hobbs? 5 things to know about Arizona's Democratic governor nominee

Get to know Kari Lake: Who is Kari Lake? 5 things to know about Arizona's Republican governor nominee

Profile of Hobbs: Democrat Katie Hobbs' defense of 2020 election puts her in spotlight in Arizona governor's race despite campaign missteps

Profile of Lake: Republican Kari Lake uses false claims about 2020 as basis for Arizona Governor's Office bid

More previous coverage: Who is running for governor? Secretary of State Katie Hobbs and former news anchor Kari Lake face off

Secretary of state

The secretary of state is next in line for the Governor's Office, and Arizona has a history of secretaries of state ascending to that position. The secretary of state is Arizona's top elections official. The office registers trademarks and businesses and oversees the state library and archives, among other duties.

Candidates for the four-year term are:

Mark Finchem, a Republican member of the state House of Representatives from Oro Valley and prominent "Stop the Steal" movement proponent who is endorsed by Trump.

Adrian Fontes, a Democrat and former Maricopa County recorder, who oversaw the 2020 election in the county.

Mark Finchem and Adrian Fontes are running for Arizona secretary of state.
Mark Finchem and Adrian Fontes are running for Arizona secretary of state.

ADDITIONAL COVERAGE 

Mark Finchem and Jan. 6: How the secretary of state candidate was involved

A 'technicality': Mark Finchem dismisses violation of state laws on financial reports 

Candidates on key election issues: End early voting? Ban machines? Here's where Arizona's secretary of state candidates stand on elections

Finchem targets Pence: Mark Finchem accuses former VP Mike Pence of orchestrating coup against Donald Trump

Klobuchar backs Fontes: 'The threat to our democracy is still real': Minnesota senator rallies Arizona Democrats

Challenge to voting: Lake, Finchem lawsuit to ban voting machines tossed due to lack of evidence of problems

Profile of Finchem: Arizona secretary of state candidate Mark Finchem doesn't trust elections. Now he wants to run them

Profile of Fontes: Arizona secretary of state candidate Adrian Fontes: 'We've got to protect democracy'

Attorney general

The attorney general is the state's top prosecutor. The office represents most state entities in legal disputes, enforces civil rights laws and leads Arizona's efforts on consumer protection. Candidates for the four-year term are:

Abe Hamadeh, a former prosecutor in the Maricopa County’s Attorney’s Office and an Army intelligence officer endorsed by Trump. Hamadeh, a Republican, is in his first political campaign.

Kris Mayes, a former member of the Arizona Corporation Commission and Democratic nominee for attorney general who was previously a moderate Republican.

Abe Hamadeh and Kris Mayes are running for Arizona attorney general.
Abe Hamadeh and Kris Mayes are running for Arizona attorney general.

ADDITIONAL COVERAGE 

How the candidates compare: In Arizona's attorney general race, courtroom experience is an issue

Q&A with candidates: How candidates for Arizona attorney general Kris Mayes, Abe Hamadeh would lead if elected

Stock trade questions: Mayes’ stock trades before 2000 newspaper sale draw questions from opponent

Candidates respond: At forum, Republican and Democratic candidates for Arizona attorney general answer criticisms

Hamadeh omits details on family's past: Abe Hamadeh's statement on father's immigration status omitted details about deportation order, records show

A complicated stance on immigration: Abe Hamadeh has hard-line positions on immigration. The AG candidate's father once faced deportation

Did Hamadeh commit voter fraud? Abe Hamadeh has made election security an issue in AG campaign. But he may have committed voter fraud

How the candidates compare on policy: Abe Hamadeh and Kris Mayes display stark differences in Arizona attorney general race

Primary election results: Abe Hamadeh wins GOP primary race, will face Democrat Kris Mayes

Profile of Mayes: Democrat with rural roots wants to be Arizona's next attorney general

Profile of Hamadeh: Trump-endorsed Arizona attorney general candidate is tired of 'weak-kneed' Republicans

Schools chief

Arizona's superintendent of public instruction leads the public school system and executes state and federal education laws. The superintendent oversees the Arizona Department of Education.

Candidates for the four-year term are:

Democrat Kathy Hoffman, the current superintendent of public instruction and an educator who led Arizona schools through the COVID-19 pandemic.

Republican Tom Horne, a former attorney general who is running for state schools chief for the third time.

Dive deeper: Find information on the schools chief and school board races in The Republic voter guide

Kathy Hoffman and Tom Horne are running for Arizona school superintendent.
Kathy Hoffman and Tom Horne are running for Arizona school superintendent.

Treasurer

The treasurer oversees banking and investment management for the state, as well as the Permanent Land Endowment.

Candidates for the four-year term are:

Republican Kimberly Yee, current state treasurer and former state lawmaker, who seeks a second term.

Democrat Martín Quezada, an attorney and member of the Arizona Senate representing Phoenix and Glendale, who has served in leadership positions in the Senate.

Kimberly Yee and Martín Quezada are running for Arizona treasurer.
Kimberly Yee and Martín Quezada are running for Arizona treasurer.

ADDITIONAL COVERAGE

Q&A with candidates on key issues: Inflation, investing, saving: Arizona treasurer candidates Martín Quezada, Kimberly Yee answer questions

Primary election results: Arizona treasurer's race: Incumbent Kimberly Yee wins, will face Martín Quezada

Profile of Yee: Arizona state treasurer candidate Kimberly Yee says she has more work to do

Profile of Quezada: Democrat Martín Quezada says Treasurer's Office shouldn't be stepping stone for other positions

Corporation Commission

Members of the Arizona Corporation Commission oversee regulated utilities in the state, like Arizona Public Service Co. and Tucson Electric Power, deciding the fate of electric rate increases among other duties. Two seats on the five-member body are up for election this year, with Commissioner Sandra Kennedy the lone incumbent.

Four candidates are running for the two four-year terms:

Democrat Sandra Kennedy, a current commissioner seeking reelection and a former state lawmaker who helped force Arizona Public Service Co. to disclose its political spending.

Democrat Lauren Kuby, a member of the Tempe City Council and a sustainability scientist at Arizona State University who is known for her environmental work.

Republican Nicholas Myers, a policy adviser to current Commissioner Justin Olson, who battled Johnson Utilities as a private citizen.

Republican Kevin Thompson, a member of the Mesa City Council who previously worked for Southwest Gas.

Sandra Kennedy (from left), Lauren Kuby, Nicholas Myers and Kevin Thompson are vying for the Arizona Corporation Commission.
Sandra Kennedy (from left), Lauren Kuby, Nicholas Myers and Kevin Thompson are vying for the Arizona Corporation Commission.

ADDITIONAL COVERAGE

Q&A with the candidates: Republicans, Democrats running for Arizona Corporation Commission give stances on key issues

Candidates debate issues: Help for coal communities, renewable energy debated by candidates for Arizona Corporation Commission

Profile of Kennedy: Arizona Corporation Commission candidate Sandra Kennedy: More work to do as 'voice for the people'

Profile of Kuby: Arizona Corporation Commission candidate Lauren Kuby wants to push for consumer protection

Profile of Myers: Arizona Corporation Commission candidate Nick Myers cites experience dealing with Johnson Utilities

Profile of Thompson: Arizona Corporation Commission candidate Kevin Thompson wants to end subsidies and mandates

Mine inspector

Only one candidate, a Republican, filed to run for mine inspector. That is Paul Marsh, a former cement company executive who was appointed as mine inspector by Gov. Doug Ducey in 2021 after then-Inspector Joe Hart resigned.

Legislature

All 90 seats in the Arizona Legislature are on the ballot this year, as they are every two years.

ADDITIONAL COVERAGE 

Post-election plan: Hard-line conservatives making big push for control of Arizona Legislature

House race with broad implications: This race for the Arizona House is among the most competitive. The result could shape future elections

Senate race to watch: In perhaps the most competitive race for AZ Legislature, candidates face off over Trump and abortion

Candidate controversy: Legislative candidate Mary Ann Mendoza silent on whether she wore blackface in photos

Control of Legislature: Which party will control the Arizona Legislature after November's election? These are the races to watch

Candidates with extreme views: Arizona candidates openly support flipping elections. How voters could put them in control

Surprise resignation for Democrats: Sen.-elect Diego Espinoza resigns, opening recently won seat to write-in candidates

Candidate's residency challenged: Arizona Senate candidate accused of living in wrong district says 'antifa' drove her from home

Incumbents get the boot: Arizona voters tossed out many current lawmakers in primary election. Here's what led to their losses

What primary means for general: Want to know what the Arizona Legislature will look like next year? The primary election will give answers

Ballot measures

Arizona voters will have 10 ballot measures to decide this Election Day.

Given the mountain of information to sort through with this many measures, The Arizona Republic has prepared a summary of each proposition, as well as the people who are supporting and opposing the proposals. Find information on the ballot measures in The Arizona Republic voters' guide.

Arizona judges

Here's what to know about all 55 judges up for retention in Maricopa County: Three on the Arizona Supreme Court, five on the Arizona Court of Appeals and 47 in Maricopa County Superior Court.

The Arizona Commission on Judicial Performance Review evaluates justices and judges to assist voters with their choices. It recommended against retaining only one judge, Maricopa County Superior Court Judge Stephen Hopkins. However, Supreme Court Justice Bill Montgomery received notably low marks.

Water board

The Central Arizona Project Canal stretches 336 miles from the Colorado River to Pima County. It's a critical source of water for residents of three Arizona counties. The Central Arizona Water Conservation District runs the massive delivery network, and its 15-member board of directors sets policy for the district.

Every other year, five seats on the board — which includes members from Maricopa, Pinal and Pima counties — open up for election to six-year terms. In 2022, all five of the seats on the ballot are for Maricopa County representatives.

Incumbents Alexandra Arboleda and Ben Graff are seeking reelection, while Jennifer Brown, Jim Holway and Mark Lews are not. That means at minimum, the board will include three new members come January.

On the ballot are Alexandra Arboleda, Ben Graff, Ylenia Aguilar, Lisa Bullington, Alan Dulaney, Shelby Duplessis, Jason Lundgren, Cory Mishkin, Amanda Monize, Donovan Neese, Jim Pederson, Karen Peters, Barbara Seago and Daniel Cirignani Wood.  Find more information about the 14 people running in this article.

What to expect: The Republic's coverage of the general election

Opinion: Find more on the races from The Republic and azcentral.com’s opinion journalists

This article originally appeared on Arizona Republic: What's on the Arizona ballot for November 2022?