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Where is Brian Laundrie?

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Megan Rapinoe is among more than 500 female athletes calling on the Supreme Court to reject a Mississippi abortion law. Thousands of Haitian migrants are gathered at the border of the USA and Mexico. And Pfizer-BioNTech said a low dose of its vaccine is safe for kids.

👋 It's Laura. It's Monday. We've got a lot of news, so let's get to it!

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FBI searches family home of Brian Laundrie

FBI agents searched the Florida home of Gabby Petito and her fiancé Brian Laundrie on Monday, the day after authorities announced that remains found in Wyoming's Bridger-Teton National Forest are probably those of Petito, the 22-year-old blogger. Petito and Laundrie, 23, lived at his parents' Florida home before leaving in July on a weeks-long, cross-country adventure. Laundrie, who returned to Florida alone Sept. 1, intensified the mystery by refusing to discuss Petito's whereabouts with authorities, then disappearing himself last week. Petito's family, living on Long Island, filed a missing persons report Sept. 11 after not hearing from their daughter since late August. Police described Laundrie as a person of interest in the case. Laundrie and his family repeatedly declined to discuss Petito's disappearance with law enforcement.

In this photo provided by North Port Police Department, law enforcement officials conduct a search of the vast Carlton Reserve in the Sarasota, Fla., area for Brian Laundrie on Saturday, Sept. 18, 2021.  Laundrie is a person of interest in the disappearance of his girlfriend, Gabrielle “Gabby” Petito.
In this photo provided by North Port Police Department, law enforcement officials conduct a search of the vast Carlton Reserve in the Sarasota, Fla., area for Brian Laundrie on Saturday, Sept. 18, 2021. Laundrie is a person of interest in the disappearance of his girlfriend, Gabrielle “Gabby” Petito.

Haitian migrant crisis continues

More than 14,500 migrants – the majority of whom are Haitian, according to officials – face high temperatures and poor conditions at a camp under a bridge at the border in Del Rio, Texas. Haitians have been crossing into the city for weeks, and 600 additional Homeland Security personnel have been sent there, Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas said Monday. In response to the rapid arrival, the United States closed the Mexican border Sunday to Del Rio, a city of about 35,000 people roughly 145 miles west of San Antonio. Mexican authorities tightened immigration controls, cut off the entry points to Ciudad Acuña to stop more migrants from reaching the border and announced they would deport Haitians.

U.S. Border Patrol agents deter Haitians from returning to the U.S. on the bank of the Rio Grande after migrants crossed back to Mexico for food and water on Sept. 19, 2021.
U.S. Border Patrol agents deter Haitians from returning to the U.S. on the bank of the Rio Grande after migrants crossed back to Mexico for food and water on Sept. 19, 2021.

What everyone's talking about

Hundreds of female athletes call on SCOTUS to reject abortion law

More than 500 current and former female athletes urged the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday to reject a Mississippi law that would prohibit abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy. In an amicus brief filed Monday, the athletes cite the importance of "bodily integrity and decisional autonomy" to their individual careers and women's sports as a whole. The list of signatories includes 26 Olympians, 73 professional athletes, 276 college athletes and some of the biggest names in women's sports – from U.S. soccer star Megan Rapinoe to WNBA veterans Sue Bird, Breanna Stewart and Diana Taurasi. The brief was filed in the case of Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization, in which the Supreme Court is set to consider the constitutionality of the Mississippi law.

Megan Rapinoe, left, and Sue Bird are among the hundreds of athletes who signed on to an amicus brief calling on the Supreme Court to reject a Mississippi abortion law.
Megan Rapinoe, left, and Sue Bird are among the hundreds of athletes who signed on to an amicus brief calling on the Supreme Court to reject a Mississippi abortion law.

Pfizer-BioNTech says low dose of its vaccine is safe for kids

Pfizer-BioNTech's COVID-19 vaccine is safe and effective for children ages 5 to 11 at one-third the dose used in adolescents and adults, according to the companies. Many parents eagerly await a vaccine for children, who returned to school amidst a national wave of COVID-19 cases. Cases in children have jumped about 240% since July. The Food and Drug Administration and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will need to sign off on the vaccine before it becomes available to children, but government officials promised to quickly review the data.

U.S. to drop travel ban for vaccinated international travelers: The United States announced an international air travel system Monday, opening travel for all vaccinated foreign nationals in early November, including those affected by the U.S. travel ban. Travelers will need to show proof of full vaccination before boarding U.S.-bound planes. A coronavirus test will be required within three days of departure, and proof of negative results must be shown.

Lexus Walter has her nose swabbed by Susie Mathis at Moore High School in Louisville, Ky., on Aug. 19.  The school was one of several in the district offering coronavirus testing for staff and students.
Lexus Walter has her nose swabbed by Susie Mathis at Moore High School in Louisville, Ky., on Aug. 19. The school was one of several in the district offering coronavirus testing for staff and students.

Real quick

63 penguins killed by bees

More than 60 penguins were killed by a swarm of bees on a beach near Cape Town, South Africa. Last week, 63 of the endangered birds were found dead in Simon's Town and taken to identify the cause of death, according to a news release from the South African National Parks. The postmortems discovered none of the penguins had external physical injuries save for multiple bee stings. Preliminary investigations found honey bees, many of which were dead at the beach site, to be the culprits. "Usually the penguins and bees co-exist," said Alison Kock, a marine biologist with South Africa's national parks agency. "The bees don't sting unless provoked – we are working on the assumption that a nest or hive in the area was disturbed and caused a mass of bees to flee the nest, swarm and became aggressive."

Adorable African penguins waddle around in a bubble party in October 2019 at the Toledo Zoo in Ohio.
Adorable African penguins waddle around in a bubble party in October 2019 at the Toledo Zoo in Ohio.

A break from the news

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This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: Gabby Petito, Brian Laundrie, Mississippi abortion law, COVID-19 vaccines for kids, Haitian migrants at border. It's Monday's news.

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