Where Ghislaine Maxwell hid out in style

Ghislaine Maxwell's home sits at the end of a narrow, half-mile dirt driveway.

It's lined with 'No Trespassing' signs and barred by a padlocked metal fence.

A stone stands near the gate with the words 'Tucked Away.'

On Tuesday (July 2), Maxwell was arrested on charges she lured girls as young as 14 years old for the late and disgraced financier Jeffrey Epstein to sexually abuse.

Maxwell had been hiding out in style since December.

A listing of her Massachusetts home said it had cathedral ceilings, a floor-to-ceiling fieldstone fireplace, and a 'wall of glass' overlooking the 156 acre property.

The FBI scorned her choice of getaway spot in the home that officials said she purchased for $1 million in cash.

"We learned she had slithered away to a gorgeous property in New Hampshire, continuing to live a life of privilege while her victims live with the trauma inflicted upon them years ago. We moved when we were ready and Miss Maxwell was arrested without incident. Like Epstein, Miss Maxwell chose to blatantly disregard the law and her responsibilities as an adult, using whatever means she had at her disposal to lure vulnerable youth into behavior they should never have been exposed and which creates lasting harm."

Maxwell's home seems to have been secluded enough to keep her out of sight in Bradford, a small town of less than 2,000 people.

Locals told Reuters they had no idea Maxwell was holed up nearby, and some said they had never seen her in town.

Maxwell's arrest is the latest twist in Epstein's saga.

He went from a former math teacher to high-flying investor and was found hanged in a New York City jail last August in an apparent suicide while awaiting trial on federal charges of trafficking.

Prosecutors on Thursday called Maxwell, an Epstein ex-girlfriend, one of his closest associates.

Video Transcript

REPORTER: Ghislaine Maxwell's home sits at the end of a narrow half-mile dirt driveway. It's lined with no trespassing signs and barred by a padlocked metal fence. A stone stands near the gate, with the words "tucked away." On Tuesday, Maxwell was arrested on charges she lured girls as young as 14 years old, for the late and disgraced financier, Jeffrey Epstein, to sexually abuse. Maxwell had been hiding out in style since December. A listing of her Massachusetts home said it had cathedral ceilings, a floor-to-ceiling fieldstone fireplace, and a wall of glass, overlooking the 156 acre property. After her arrest, the FBI scorned her choice of getaway spot, a home that officials say she purchased for $1 million in cash.

- We learned she had slithered away to a gorgeous property in New Hampshire, continuing to live a life of privilege, while her victims live with the trauma inflicted upon them years ago. We moved when we were ready, and Miss Maxwell was arrested without incident. Like Epstein, Miss Maxwell chose to blatantly disregard the law and her responsibility as an adult, using whatever means she had at her disposal to lure vulnerable youth into behavior they should never have been exposed, and which creates lasting harm.

REPORTER: Maxwell's home seems to have been secluded enough to keep her out of sight in Bradford, a small town of less than 2000 people. Locals told Reuters they had no idea Maxwell was holed up nearby. And some said they had never seen her in town. Maxwell's arrest is the latest twist in Epstein's saga. He went from a former math teacher to high-flying investor, and was found hanged in a New York City jail last August in an apparent suicide, while awaiting trial on federal charges of trafficking. Prosecutors, on Thursday, called Maxwell, who was Epstein's ex-girlfriend, one of his closest associates.