Why this diabetes patient fears a no-deal Brexit

Her daily routine is a matter of life and death for Georgina.

She is one of Britain's one million diabetics now facing the possibility of medical shortages if the UK plunges out of the European Union without a deal at the end of October.

(SOUNDBITE) (English) LONDON RESIDENT AND DIABETES PATIENT, GEORGINA, SAYING:

"I can't tell you how worried I am about that. It's life-threatening for me."

Her fears have been exacerbated by the British government's own planning for a worst case scenario.

The Yellowhammer document suggests the important Calais to Dover trade route could face months of disruption, and the pharmaceuticals industry is particularly vulnerable.

That's because three quarters of the 37 million packs of drugs imported from Europe each month, come through the short straits route.

Georgina is concerned that the medical supplies she depends on could dwindle.

She tests her blood sugar levels four times a day to work out how much of an insulin boost she needs at meal times, in addition to a pump that gives her a low level dosage of insulin 24 hours a day.

(SOUNDBITE) (English) LONDON RESIDENT AND DIABETES PATIENT, GEORGINA, SAYING:

"I can live without the pump and I can live without all the bits and pieces that go with the pump but I cannot live without the blood testing strips because that's just as important, nearly as important, as having an adequate insulin supply. And the two really go so hand in hand, that's the one thing I don't think people realize."

She may take some comfort from private sector preparations.

(SOUNDBITE) (English) GENERAL MANAGER OF NOVO NORDISK UK, PINDER SAHOTA, SAYING:

"At Novo Nordisk we've been preparing for the last three years, if not more than that, for the worst-case scenario."

Pinder Sahota is the UK general manager of the world's biggest insulin maker, Novo Nordisk.

(SOUNDBITE) (English) GENERAL MANAGER OF NOVO NORDISK UK, PINDER SAHOTA, SAYING:

"So what we've done is we've increased our stock level from - a normal average of stock-holding is six weeks, we've increased that to 18 weeks."

That's a warehouse capacity of 3.8 million packs of insulin. Piled up - they'd stand 12 times the height of London's Shard skyscraper.

Novo Nordisk has also reserved spaces on alternate ferry routes and air freight if required while exploring other factors such as what to do in the event of fuel shortages.

(SOUNDBITE) (English) GENERAL MANAGER OF NOVO NORDISK UK, PINDER SAHOTA, SAYING:

"Whilst we can control what we can control, it's the uncertainties of how long will the delays be, that are factors outside our control. But we're doing everything we can to ensure that the patients can continue to get the medicines that they need."

But the situation is increasing tensions between industry and the government - and not just around the intricacies of planning for a no-deal.

Hugo Fry, UK managing director of France's Sanofi, also says that patients have to be prioritized.

(SOUNDBITE) (English) MANAGING DIRECTOR OF SANOFI UK, HUGO FRY, SAYING:

"Of course, we're starting to ask ourselves the question... although we're happy to do it, it is starting to weigh on our balance sheet, on our logistics, keeping all this additional stock in the country."

And that leads to another frustration - that while the companies like Sanofi and Novo Nordisk dedicate huge resources to such preparation, they are having to spend less time on their normal job - bringing innovative drugs to market.