Woman in ‘Disaster Girl’ meme sells the original photo for more than $473k

Graeme Massie
·2 min read
<p>Woman in ‘Disaster Girl’ meme sells the original photo for more than $473k</p> (Foundation)

Woman in ‘Disaster Girl’ meme sells the original photo for more than $473k

(Foundation)

The woman in the “Disaster Girl” meme has sold the original photo as an NFT for more than $473,000.

Zoe Roth, 21, is Internet famous for being the four-year-old girl pictured in a photograph standing in front of a burning building with a mischievous look on her face.

Zoe, who is now a university student, decided to sell the picture as a Non-Fungible Token, which have become a craze in digital art during the pandemic.

NFT’s are tokenised versions of assets that can be traded on a blockchain, which is the digital ledger behind cryptocurrency such as bitcoin and ethereum.

Digital artist Beeple hit the headlines in march when his “Everydays” NFT sold for $68m at Christie’s.

Ms Roth decided to turn the meme photo, which was taken by her amateur photographer father Dave, into an NFT, after receiving an email in February that said it was worth a significant figure in the market.

The picture was taken in January 2005 when Zoe and her family were living two blocks away from a fire station in Mebane, North Carolina.

Firefighters were performing a controlled burn to clear a nearby property and her father decided to test out his new camera.

It later won JPG magazine’s “Emotion Capture” contest before appearing on a host of image sharing websites.

Ms Roth listed the NFT on an auction site for 24 hours earlier this month and following a string of bids it sold for 180 ether, coins of the cryptocurrency ethereum.

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Those coins were worth $2,644 each as of Tuesday afternoon.

The NFT was coded in such a way that Ms Roth and her father will also receive 10 per cent of the sale any time the NFT is bought in the future.

She says she will share the money among her family and give her portion to non-profits.

“Nobody who is a meme tried to do that, it just ended up that way. Is it luck? Is it fate? I have no idea. But I will take it,” Ms Roth told The Raleigh News & Observer.

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