Woman with Down syndrome loses case aiming to stop abortions because of 'disabilities'

Woman with Down syndrome loses case aiming to stop abortions because of 'disabilities'
·2 min read

A woman with Down syndrome lost her case to overturn a U.K. abortion law allowing women to abort after 24 weeks because of disabilities, saying it makes her feel like she "shouldn't be here."

Heidi Crowter, 26, said if she lost her case, she would appeal the decision and continue to fight against "downright discriminatory" abortion laws.

"I don't like to have to justify my existence, it makes me feel like I'm not as valuable as anyone else. It makes me feel like I shouldn't be here," Crowter said. "I will keep on fighting."

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Abortion is legal in the United Kingdom up to the 24-week point or until birth if there is "a substantial risk that if the child were born it would suffer from such physical or mental abnormalities as to be seriously handicapped," according to the Associated Press.

Two doctors must approve the procedure and affirm that the abortion would pose a lesser risk to the mother's physical or mental health than giving birth would, according to a report. Abortions for reasons including fetal abnormalities that would indicate a disability are permitted by law.

"The issues which have given rise to this claim are highly sensitive and sometimes controversial," British legal officials said in a statement. "They generate strong feelings, on all sides of the debate, including sincere differences of view about ethical and religious matters ... This court cannot enter into those controversies; it must decide the case only in accordance with the law."

Heidi's husband, James Crowter, echoed his wife's sentiment.

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"I'm really upset not to win, but the fight is not over," he said. "The judges might not think it discriminates against me, the government might not think it discriminates against me, but I'm telling you that I do feel discriminated against and the verdict doesn't change how I and thousands in the Down's syndrome community feel."

"We face discrimination every day in schools, in the workplace and in society. Thanks to the verdict, the judges have upheld discrimination in the womb too," he added. "This is a very sad day but I will keep on fighting."

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Tags: News, United Kingdom, Down Syndrome, Abortion

Original Author: Matthew Miller

Original Location: Woman with Down syndrome loses case aiming to stop abortions because of 'disabilities'

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